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Well Gracie has not done this in a very long time. As a puppy and up until she was about 7 months old Gracie would have burst of over excitement that would turn into her lunging and biting..not hard but she has made marks on me, it sometimes comes out of no where...sometimes if where in the house and she starts barking to go out and I don't get up quick enough, sometimes if I go to put her leash on her. I really believe it starts as excitement but then it turns into OVER excitement and then she just can't control it. What should I do, anyone have any experience with this? My gut tells me to just ignore her until this over excitement goes away or maybe distract her with something else to try to snap her out of it. Could there be something wrong with her?? Help from anyone is appreciated.

Gracie is 14 months old
 

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You describe exactly what my 10 YO Mitzi does. Sometimes out of nowhere,she goes nuts, full body wag,overexcited, jumps up at my face for kisses and nibbles making noises the whole time. Bruno and Judy know she's not allowed to jump on me and they intervene. I try to push her down and try to get her to calm down, but it's impossible. It's as if she's feeling her oats and directing all her lab love at me. What do you do about it... enjoy it, but try to protect yourself.
 

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You describe exactly what my 10 YO Mitzi does. Sometimes out of nowhere,she goes nuts, full body wag,overexcited, jumps up at my face for kisses and nibbles making noises the whole time. Bruno and Judy know she's not allowed to jump on me and they intervene. I try to push her down and try to get her to calm down, but it's impossible. It's as if she's feeling her oats and directing all her lab love at me. What do you do about it... enjoy it, but try to protect yourself.
def agree..my mom gets mad because I laugh at her, she tells me I should be correcting her. I do tell her "NO" but sometimes I am laughing so hard that it isn't really a correction. I know this behavior isn't coming from an aggressive place, I really believe it is over excitement and then she just doesn't know what to do. She has so much personality and she expresses herself a lot...we love her:)
 

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I remember something like this SO well from Angus' puppyhood. He did it a lot, almost constantly in fact, when he was in the 3-5 month range. I sincerely thought there must be something wrong with him...I had never seen a dog just lose his mind so completely.

He would get this look in his eyes like he was no longer at home, so to speak. It was a wild look, the kind of look an animal has when they are being chased maybe? It looked like he had "checked out." He would then commence jumping, biting, lunging, and seemed almost desperate. As though there was something SO urgent he was trying to tell me. There was nothing you could do except leave, or put him in the crate. I tried every suggestion everyone here could come up with (and there were many). The big thing I noticed was that anything physical at all seemed to ramp it up even further.

No kidding, I remember I spent one week with him in "quarantine" because I was convinced he had rabies. :p Then I thought he had a brain tumor. He was absolutely creepy when he did this! It was truly like living with a wild, untamed animal.

The one thing that worked for us was training. If I gave him something to focus on, and kept him focused on it, we didn't have those episodes. And that, boys and girls, is how we got started in obedience training. LOL We did a LOT of training. Like, 90% of the time he was out of the crate, we were training.

He finally outgrew it, and maybe by a year or so he stopped having these full-blown attacks of whatever the heck that was. But I tell you what, I think he is still capable of becoming overstimulated and always will be. He is better at reigning it in now (or I am better at seeing it coming and stopping it before it starts...not sure which). But the other time I remember the crazed look with him was when he and Simon got into that last fight they had. I could have stopped Simon. I couldn't stop Angus.
 

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Abbey is going to be three in April and she still has those crazy moments. Normally accompanied by running around the house, doing crazy eights around the dining room table and the coffee table, bouncing off of the couch as she goes. :)
 

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Ernie used to do it. I would try and put him outside. He would roll over in the crocodile death roll trying to bite. As Connie says training or keeping their mind busy helps and being consistent.

Gemma the border Collie does it if she hasn't had enough excersie or need time out in her crate. Some days I can give her enough excerise, but she wants more so gets too silly and can't stop once she starts. Again crate time sorts her out, and some quiet games. Find the ball, or training. I try not to let her get too over stimulated.
 

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I remember something like this SO well from Angus' puppyhood. He did it a lot, almost constantly in fact, when he was in the 3-5 month range. I sincerely thought there must be something wrong with him...I had never seen a dog just lose his mind so completely.

He would get this look in his eyes like he was no longer at home, so to speak. It was a wild look, the kind of look an animal has when they are being chased maybe? It looked like he had "checked out." He would then commence jumping, biting, lunging, and seemed almost desperate. As though there was something SO urgent he was trying to tell me. There was nothing you could do except leave, or put him in the crate. I tried every suggestion everyone here could come up with (and there were many). The big thing I noticed was that anything physical at all seemed to ramp it up even further.

No kidding, I remember I spent one week with him in "quarantine" because I was convinced he had rabies. :p Then I thought he had a brain tumor. He was absolutely creepy when he did this! It was truly like living with a wild, untamed animal.

The one thing that worked for us was training. If I gave him something to focus on, and kept him focused on it, we didn't have those episodes. And that, boys and girls, is how we got started in obedience training. LOL We did a LOT of training. Like, 90% of the time he was out of the crate, we were training.

He finally outgrew it, and maybe by a year or so he stopped having these full-blown attacks of whatever the heck that was. But I tell you what, I think he is still capable of becoming overstimulated and always will be. He is better at reigning it in now (or I am better at seeing it coming and stopping it before it starts...not sure which). But the other time I remember the crazed look with him was when he and Simon got into that last fight they had. I could have stopped Simon. I couldn't stop Angus.
I don't feel all alone on this one anymore ..I thought about the brain tumor thing too. She is getting better at controlling it as she gets older. As you experienced, anything physical only increases this behavior..so its the crate or I simply walk away. Thank everyone for reassuring me I have a completely normal lab:)
 

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More exercise! He wants to play, go and throw him a ball and play fetch until he burns his excess energy. This is normal lab puppy behavior out of control (sometimes even not so puppy). My cocker used to have those crazy energy spurts when she was a pup. She would run all over the house jumping like crazy and running wild like she had fire on her tail.

I don´t know why but when they are over 6 months old and become aware of how strong they are, they just love doing it. It´s like "look I can control my body and move sooo fast, I am SO agile"
 

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Your post made me feel so much better! Bailey is almost 11 months old and she has her wild out of control moments. It's like something takes over her and she will jump up on me and nip at my clothes, blanket, or a pillow near me on the couch. I ignore her then the second she calms down I give her a treat and we play fetch. I used to get frustrated which made her "outbursts" as I called them even worse. Even if I say "no" in my stern voice it sets her off more. Ignoring her works best for me. She still has these moments, but they are far less than they were in the past.
 

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Oh I remember it well, when Sammi was between 7 and 10months, she would go through this period of time almost everyday at approx. the same time- didn't matter how much exercise she got, it seemed like she just had this burst of energy that has to be used up! DH started calling it " Sammi's Happy Hour" even though it only lasted a few minutes:smile:
 
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