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Discussion Starter #1
You'll get different responses to this...I prefer to do it around 6 or 7 months....others wait until 12 months. I'd talk to your vet.
 

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I was planning on talking to them when I get Sydney spayed around 6 months. That said I only take what the vet says with a grain of salt and really need to find a new one. Depending on the vet we get that day we get conflicting stories opinions. That and they think I need to switch to science diet cause they say it is a good hypo allergenic food and that her stool issue was allergy related. They are not allergy related at all so that said I am only taking what they say as an opinion so I wanted to see what everyone else said.

Jenny
 

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If you're feeding a Large Breed Puppy food formula, the majority of studies say to continue on it until the dog is full grown or at least for the first 12 months.
 

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Well, we are trying Maui on new food. Canidae - anyone heard of it?

I am hoping somehow this will make him satisfied with his food and he will lay off the rocks.

A few weeks ago he just started losing interest in his Large Breed Pro Plan Puppy chow. He's going to be a year old on May 25th.
 

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I am currently struggling with this very question. The breeder suggested to switch to adult food at 5 months. The trainer says to switch at 6 months. My pup is 5 and a half months and I haven't switched her yet. I am hearing many different opinions about this. I want to switch her food anyway (the brand) because I think she could be on something much better than Pro Plan. So when I make the switch to a new food, I am trying to decide whether to put her on adult or keep her on Large Breed Puppy. What I would like to know is...........what are the reasons for keeping the pup on puppy formula, and what would be the reasons for switching to adult? I want to do what's best for my girl. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
ProPlan is a decent food.

Jenny, Science Diet is CRAP. Tell me about her stool issue and how it's allergy related. Dogs don't get allergies until they are between the ages of 1 and 3.
 

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bebopalula- I'd go with your breeder's advice. You trusted them enough to take one of their puppies and I'm assuming they're the ones guaranteeing her...

I also agree that pro plan is a good food that many, many lab owners/breeders have great sucess with.
 

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I would follow the advice of your breeder as they know how their lines develope and mature.

Puppy food has more calcium than adult among other things and the reason to switch to adult at 5 to 6 months of age. You don't want a growing pup to have too much calcium. Excessive protein in a growing pup is another issue.

However, I am hearing reports lately that hi protein is not being considered a deterent in a growing pup as it was in the past. Had an email from a college student who just did a big study/research (backed by scientific studies) on this issue and waiting for her to send me her findings.

I am very interested in this as I just found out my dog food was recalled and my dogs were eating from a tainted bag. I am taking my dogs off all grains because of this recall and have switched to a very hi protein grain free food - at least until this whole recall is over and done for 6 months to a year. I have switched my dogs to Nature's Variety Instinct.

Anyone else here on the board feed this and how do your dogs do on it and what ages are they? I'm interested in others experience as this food and such high protein 42% is very new to me.

I have gotten good feedback on this food from other forums but am also interested in the opinions of members of this board as well.

TIA for any info.
 

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Snowco Labradors said:
I would follow the advice of your breeder as they know how their lines develope and mature.

Puppy food has more calcium than adult among other things and the reason to switch to adult at 5 to 6 months of age. You don't want a growing pup to have too much calcium. Excessive protein in a growing pup is another issue.

However, I am hearing reports lately that hi protein is not being considered a deterent in a growing pup as it was in the past. Had an email from a college student who just did a big study/research (backed by scientific studies) on this issue and waiting for her to send me her findings.

I am very interested in this as I just found out my dog food was recalled and my dogs were eating from a tainted bag. I am taking my dogs off all grains because of this recall and have switched to a very hi protein grain free food - at least until this whole recall is over and done for 6 months to a year. I have switched my dogs to Nature's Variety Instinct.

Anyone else here on the board feed this and how do your dogs do on it and what ages are they? I'm interested in others experience as this food and such high protein 42% is very new to me.

I have gotten good feedback on this food from other forums but am also interested in the opinions of members of this board as well.

TIA for any info.
Snowco, I'm so sorry to hear you've been affected by the recall. I don't blame you for being confused - it seems a lot of well-meaning breeders perpetuate the myths about puppy foods. I hope someone can provide a link to the original studies (Bob Pr?) but I think it's safe to say calcium levels are not an issue with large breed puppy formulas, which are specifically formulated with reduced calcium levels. Many adult foods carry much more calcium. This is the case with the food you have chosen, Instict. Instinct wouldn't be appropriate for large breed puppies, but is fine for adults who are capable of handling the excess calcium.

As for protein levels, controlled studies (dating back some 20+ years, so this is not "new" information) have shown that protein levels up to 32% have had no ill effects on growing puppies. Higher levels above 32% have not been studied, but raw feeders can assure you that their dogs do not suffer on MUCH higher protein levels.

Good luck with your new food!
 

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In the past couple of years, a large number of food companies have reevaluated the calcium levels in their foods, so I personally see large breed puppy foods becoming a gimmic (as large breed adult is) relatively soon.

When I was looking for a puppy food for Darwin (now 4), it was difficult to find a puppy food with a calcium level I was comfortable with (~1.0). The only companies that had large breed specific formulas were foods that I personally didn't want to feed at the time. I ended up giving him Innova puppy food and was very pleased with the results. I switched him to adult (Wellness) when hewas 9 months.

Piper was fed a variety of puppy foods (I'm a big fan of rollercoasters ::) ) and then switched to an adult formula at 6 months. Puzzle was fed regular Pro Plan Puppy (all Pro Plan foods are ~1.0 % calcium) and then switched to Pro Plan adult at 5 months. I plan on doing the same with Bono. All of my adult dogs are, certified, orthopedically sound ;)

This is just my personal experience with puppies. I know a number of breeders who don't feed puppy food at all and have great success with that. I also know some people (most field dogs) that feed puppy food for the first 2 yrs. As I said, and others have as well, your BEST bet is to talk to your breeder. They, should, know their lines and how the grow best.
 

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"In the past couple of years, a large number of food companies have reevaluated the calcium levels in their foods, so I personally see large breed puppy foods becoming a gimmic (as large breed adult is) relatively soon."

I agree with this and have never fed a large breed puppy food.

Thank you for the links. Very informative.

I am not feeding my new hi protein food to young pups as I too feel its too hi for them. With all this recall going on I have no idea what I will feed my next litter. I sure hope they staighten all this out by then and will continue to do my research.
 

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Snowco Labradors said:
"In the past couple of years, a large number of food companies have reevaluated the calcium levels in their foods, so I personally see large breed puppy foods becoming a gimmic (as large breed adult is) relatively soon."

I agree with this and have never fed a large breed puppy food.

Thank you for the links. Very informative.

I am not feeding my new hi protein food to young pups as I too feel its too hi for them. With all this recall going on I have no idea what I will feed my next litter. I sure hope they staighten all this out by then and will continue to do my research.
I'm sure I'm just reading your post wrong, but since it never pays to "assume" I just wanted to double check that you had read the link correctly. It's not the protein at stake, but the amount of calcium. By a year of age (and probably somewhat younger) puppies have developed the ability to excrete the extra calcium, but prior to that time, a food such as the one you are currently feeding your adult dogs (with 2.49% calium) could have negative effects.

BTW, I agree with JacksAndLabs that the newly reduced calcium levels in a lot of "regular" puppy foods now make the large breed formulas less important, but doesn't make them "bad".
 

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everydog, if Patty says she is not feeding the hi protein food to her pups, by default wouldn't that mean she is not feeding them the hi calcium food either since they are one and the same??
 

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CYNLABS said:
everydog, if Patty says she is not feeding the hi protein food to her pups, by default wouldn't that mean she is not feeding them the hi calcium food either since they are one and the same??
Yes, but when she says, "I am not feeding my new hi protein food to young pups as I too feel its too hi for them" I thought she meant the protein. I also "assumed" (there's that word again!) she had no pups had home. Perhaps I was mistaken. Since some don't consider dogs over 6 months old to be puppies, it seemed worthwhile to point out the downside, even with older puppies. Many feed a high protein raw diet to their young puppies, and as long as the calcium levels are kept in check, there should be no ill efects.
 
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