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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im considering taking my pup to a trainer?Kanati is 4 months old now.If I do say so myself,he is pretty **** smart.He know how to sit/stay unless really excited,he can jump when I ask him to,lay when I say so and do the commando walk lol lol.He is completly house broken.We even have a bell on the back patio door that he rings when he needs to go out.
What I cant seem to do is keep him from jumping on other people.I know he's a pup and its normal but when he gets bigger that will be a problem.When the front door rings he gets excited and can seem to sit/stay.
What do you guys/gals recommend?
Thanks
 

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Right now, no reason to wait. I'd get him to a good trainer (NOT PETSMART, YUCK!) once he's had his second shots, which he should by now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Right now, no reason to wait. I'd get him to a good trainer (NOT PETSMART, YUCK!) once he's had his second shots, which he should by now.
I never considered going to Petsmart.He is done with his second shots.Time to start making some calls to some trainers and see what they charge.
 

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I would also advise going to sit in on a few classes before you sign up and see if your potential trainer's philosophies are similar to your own.

Both of my boys started puppy kindergarten classes when they were about 10 weeks old, and then on to more formal obedience training.

Good luck and have fun with your pup! He's cute!
 

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Agree with the above, however I did the Petsmart training and had a great experience. It's very focused to "pet" dogs and as such they work a lot on manners like jumping up, leash walking, etc. I think it all depends on the trainer. ;)

Very good idea to look into it ahead of time, sit in on a few classes and see if it's a good fit. Have fun!
 

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agree with all above. It's NEVER too early to train good manners, if he's already capable of tricks like the commando walk then I think he's definitely fine to learn some guest greeting manners :)
 

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Agree with the above, however I did the Petsmart training and had a great experience. It's very focused to "pet" dogs and as such they work a lot on manners like jumping up, leash walking, etc. I think it all depends on the trainer. ;)

Very good idea to look into it ahead of time, sit in on a few classes and see if it's a good fit. Have fun!
I'm sure it varies on the teacher, but I tend to not like bringing a puppy to a Petsmart, so dirty in there. I've never been to a clean one. We have two locally and I've been to a few others that I wouldn't want to walk on the floor in.

The local ones here advocate all sorts of contraptions to get your dog to stay with you, harnesses, head halters etc. They aren't actually training the dog. The instructor takes classes at my regular club, so I know she knows how to train, she just isn't allowed to do it her way at Petsmart.
 

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Yes, the earlier you can start training, the better.

Where are you located, perhaps some folks are in your area and suggest good places to try.
 

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I'm in favor of YOU learning how to train your dog rather than relying on a trainer to do it.

Get a good book on dog training, such as Jean Donaldson's "Culture Clash" which is mainstream. Read it. Do what the book says.

Also, use that learning to evaluate the way instructors at local classes operate. Stay away from those with quirky ideas about dogs and training.

Sign up for a class with a good instructor. The instructor often is able to point out things that you're doing with your voice, timing, posture, etc., that is defeating what you're trying to accomplish.

Although I trained my first Lab quite well (in an era when there weren't the multiple dog training classes there are now), when I got Puff I watched the instructor at PetsMart and thought she was excellent. We enrolled and found it helpful. She'd had a lot of training, being mentored, and experience and all of that shone through.

The instructor who replaced her was a young woman whom I'd previously seen grooming dogs in that PetsMart. I stopped for a few minutes and observed her teaching a few classes. She was a FAR cry from having the level of talent our trainer had.

So do your homework and evaluating.

 

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I'm sure it varies on the teacher, but I tend to not like bringing a puppy to a Petsmart, so dirty in there. I've never been to a clean one. We have two locally and I've been to a few others that I wouldn't want to walk on the floor in.

The local ones here advocate all sorts of contraptions to get your dog to stay with you, harnesses, head halters etc. They aren't actually training the dog. The instructor takes classes at my regular club, so I know she knows how to train, she just isn't allowed to do it her way at Petsmart.
Ours used a clicker, but that was pretty well the only contraption. ;) I'm sure they must be pushed to sell stuff though, that would make sense to me from a business point of view, however I just don't think our instructor really cared about that aspect. The only time she recommended an "aid" for leash walking was in a case where the owner was a willowy chick who maybe weighed 100 pounds soaking wet trying to walk her adopted 10 month old lab/rottie who easily outweighed her, who would pull her right to the ground and keep on truckin'. :eek:

I don't find our local one dirty. Some dropped kibbles here and there where bags have a leak, but thats about it. And I think that made for great distraction training. :)

In Peanut's class (same instructor) it was in the middle of the day on a sunday, so it was super busy in there, which was awesome. People talking and laughing, other dogs barking and being crazy, funny sounds like squeaky carts and all that. Great environment for working on distraction training and proofing, which was essentially what we were there for. I still take Baloo in there for that same reason.

So bottom line, it depends. :)
 

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I would go to the AKC website and look up any canine obedience clubs in your area and/or also look for a local labrador retriever club. I know you're only looking for a pet trainer at this point but it would help to find someone that 'knows' dogs really well. Dog training is not a one size fits all, so it would be nice to have someone that can read your pup and gear the training for what would work best with him. Manners stem from canine behavior and to get a basic knowledge via reading will help you a lot with training and working through any issues that might crop up.

Obedience clubs often have trainers as members that they could refer to you and so would a labrador retriever club. If you find someone that knows retrievers they could help you to use the intrinsic characteristics of the breed while training.

My boy went to his first obedience class at 3months after his shots were completed. However, now that I've learned more I know more about puppy training and there is lots you can do with them at a young age...performance dogs begin right away mostly puppy games that build a good foundation.

Anyhow, I also agree that you want to audit any training class before you sign up and maybe even arrive a little early before the class so you might be able to talk to some of the class members....though usually with puppies they are all new. I would check out the beginner puppy class and then maybe the next level or an advance level training class to see how the training progresses and to talk to someone that has been with that trainer for awhile. Just a thought.

Happy Training!
 

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"What I cant seem to do is keep him from jumping on other people"

This may have been mentioned already as I haven't read all the responses, but the best method I've found is to "feed the dog a knee". As the dog jumps up, give it a good knee to the chest and give the command "off". If the behavior continues, make the knee strikes harder until the dog gets the idea.
 

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caveat about "the knee" - the instructor I used to work for saw this used in one of her classes - dog was a big male chesepeake, owner was a big tall man, floor was a church basement linoleum. Oog jumped, man raised knee, dog hit knee and went straight over backwards, WHAM THUD landing right on his back and it was a VERY long few seconds until that dog regained its breath and wits and was able to stand up again.
 

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It sounds as though your dog is definitely ready for obedience training. As well as sitting in on a few lessons, if you can, get references. I'm sure you'll find a trainer who will be great for you and your dog.

The place I'm planning to take my pup for training has Wednesday night drop in ($10) socialization classes that are open to puppies between 10 and 18 weeks of age with up to date vaccines and veterinary exam, give the pup a chance to play and socialze with other pups and people and discuss puppy issues such as biting, chewing and potty training - something like this, if you could find it, would give you a good opportunity to see how things work at a potential training place. I will also be starting obedience training with him asap ...
 

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Picking up my 8 week old pup this Friday. What will he be able to learn at that point? Should I use anything besides a collar and leash (treats, clicker?). I'll be honest, I haven't read much on it yet, but I've heard the pup should be able to learn to sit (for a short time), and lay down right away. The breeder recommended a chain collar for training. I've never owned a dog so I'm not really sure where to start. I'm figuring I'm not really going to let him out except to go to the bathroom until he gets his parvo vaccine. So with that said, what should I teach him in weeks 8-16?
 

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Order Jackie Mertens DVD "sound beginnings" from Amazon. It will be well worth the $25 bucks and break it down step by step. Trust me! ;)
 

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A flat nylon buckle collar or other material though I recommend nylon because they are cheap and the pup will grow out of a puppy one rather quickly. Leather is also nice. A light leash that the pup can drag around while being SUPERVISED at all times while wearing it....this will get him used to being on a leash. If you have a long line you can go outside with the pup and let the pup explore freely while you step on end of the line so that he gets the idea it is good to be in your area. Let the pup walk around and then call him to you offering a treat or toy....be very happy and praise when he gives you his attention...i.e. looks at you. Chase games where he chases/follows you around are great.

Capturing behaviors are LOTS of fun at this age. Have a clicker and treat in hand....see what the pup will do to try to get the treat. Sometimes they'll naturally sit....the second the pup sits "Click" "Good Sit" "--treat.....same if the pup goes Down on his own-- "Click" "Good Down" Treat. You can also condition the pup to the clicker at this age.

Just lots of things you can do. Any one of the puppy books about building a good foundation would help you along.

Encourage retrieving games of any kind are good. A lot of the things he'll be learning will be through play which is the way puppies learn best at this age. You can also when he gets older start to shape and model specific behaviors.

I'm really excited for you....puppies are so much fun and are like sponges...they learn quickly. Stimulation is key to their learning.
 

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I highly recommend any of these books

So many good books out there....

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BUILDING BLOCKS FOR PERFORMANCE
by Bobbie Anderson (See other books by author)
Publisher: Alpine Publishing
Edition: 2002 Paperback, 142 pages

ISBN: 1577790375
Summary: Building drive, focus, and motivation in a puppy through goal-oriented play and a variety of other positive experiences. Will help trainers bond strongly with their puppy, build a solid foundation of teamwork, and encourage the puppy to develop a "send me in, coach!" attitude. Methods will work for a puppy destined for any performance career from obedience or agility to tracking or lure coursing.

The above is good if you want to compete in any dogsport in the future...below are some excellent general puppybooks that I really like.


PUPPY PRIMER (SCIDMORE, MCCONNELL)
by Brenda Scidmore & Patricia McConnell (See other books by author)

Publisher: Dog's Best Friend, Ltd.
Edition: 1998 Paperback, 65 pages

ISBN: 1891767011
Summary: Raise that new puppy successfully with this understandable and user-friendly primer! Includes socialization, how to raise a confident puppy, basic obedience/manners, crate training, play biting, housetraining.

A newer one that came out after my boy was raised is Smart Puppy....I'll add this one to my collection for raising my next pup.


MY SMART PUPPY (BOOK & DVD)
by Brian Kilcommons & Sarah Wilson (See other books by author)

Publisher: Warner Books
Edition: 2006 Hardback, 320 pages

ISBN: 044657886X

Summary: Fun, effective, and easy puppy training! Includes bonus DVD with training demonstrations.



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Expanded Description:

You can't teach a puppy important life lessons by yelling "No!" Instead you need to let your puppy know what you want in a way she understands. Filled with helpful training photos and a DVD to demonstrate techniques, this book provides fun, dog-friendly and effective ways to quickly establish good puppy habits and manners and prevent bad behavior.


You can get some great books from www.dogwise.com where they have detail on the various books. I also order from Amazon or Borders because you can buy new or used. I order used from Amazon which has only $3.99 shipping and often they come from GoodWill so my money is going to a good cause.

If you're really interested in the theory & methodology of various training methods and/or canine behavior anything by Patricia McConnell or Brenda Alloff would be great. I wish that I had read more in depth books not just the "How To" books when Sandy was younger but have built on my knowledge so I can be a better trainer for my next lab , though Sandy is a great lab and he's done well for me. Just knowing about canine communication & behavior will help you to understand your puppy.
This one I am reading now and enjoying it very much:

EXCEL-ERATED LEARNING
by Pamela Reid
Publisher: James & Kenneth
Edition: 1996 Paperback, 172 pages

ISBN: 1888047070

Summary: Motivation, stages of learning, operant conditioning, factors that affect learning, negative punishment. In plain English--at last! Select the methods that work best for your dog!


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Expanded Description:

Explains in plain English how dogs learn and how best to teach them! Contents: Motivation, stages of learning, why study learning, science of behaviorism, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, single-event learning, factors that affect learning (timing, schedules of reinforcement), stimulus (signal) control, aversive control of behavior, negative punishment, the application of learning principles to changing behavior, social learning, and more.
 

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Check with your local kennel clubs or others who may be offering Puppy Kindergarten (for the person w/ the 8 wk old). For the OP, I'd go straight to a CGC class.

There is no replacement for a class even if you think you can do it yourself. Your dog needs to learn good social manners around other dogs and it's hard to duplicate yourself if you aren't really into the dog world.

As for jumping, try grabbing and squeezing (mild pressure) the front paws. It works a LOT better than the knee for sure! I have done that w/ my almost 6 mo old and wished I'd known that trick earlier. And before anyone starts to worry that they may make their dogs paw "shy" (sensitive)... she's a champ at getting her nails done both w/ clippers and dremel. ;) Anne
 
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