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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been following the 2X2 training method and I can finally say that we have 4 poles! I am so excited because it is fun to see him hop the last 2 poles and it is cool to see that it has clicked in his head. He is making the entry from different angles on the arc and with a jump. I am so excited! I guess we are on stage 9. Last night, I introduced the third set of poles and it threw him off at first, but then he got them too.

I started this 2X2 in December but didn't practice with any consistency at first. We started in earnest the day after Christmas. I started back at stage one and just made sure that he had it before moving to the next step. In fact, I thought we had 4 straight poles about 2 weeks ago then saw we didn't so I stepped back a few stages and then proceeded and now he's got it. I also kept our sessions really short, 2-3 minutes but with higher frequency. Some days, we had 3-4 sessions. Most days only 2 because I am at work all day. I do think the high frequency and short sessions are a big key. My dog is ball crazy so a ball is always thrown down the reward line that makes it a fun party for him.

Now I've added the jump but since, due to the weather, I am limited to my driveway, I am keeping that jump really low.

It was fun to return to agility class on Tuesday and be able to show Miles doing 4 straight poles. :p

Hopefully, I will be able to say we have 6 straight poles soon!
 

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Can you tell me if you start this out by throwing the ball through the entry of the two poles from all directions? How do you add the third pole?

My dog will do the 6 poles and learned with the channel method, however, she finds it very boring. I've heard the method you are using creates more enthusiasm.
Thank you,
Susan
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Coyote, it is hard to explain.

I used Susan Garrett's 2X2 method. I have the transcript from her video and I am following it pretty closely.

I started with 2 poles. I had an imaginary reward line that was pretty much through the middle. At first, if the dog so much as looks throught the poles, I threw a treat. I moved to the ball later because I moved outside. Soon he only got the reward when we moved through the poles. Yes, I moved all around the poles but he had to take them in the same direction. I just stood there and didn't reward until he made the decision to move. Later I added a second set of poles about 15 feet away. You never have 3 poles. You go from 2 to 4 to 6. I rewarded between each set of poles. Then I angled the 2 sets to 2 o'clock, 8 o'clock. Worked that till he got it then I move the poles about 7 feet apart, then 4 feet and angled the poles to 1 o'clock and 7o'clock. Gradually moving closer and straighter and working all angles before advancing.

That explaination is probably about as clear as mud! I will say that the first few weeks, I really didn't feel like this was ever going to look like a dog actually working weave poles. It is important to not move to the next stage until you are sure your dog "got it". Now, I can see that my dog understands what his job is with those poles and he drives through them pretty well considering we are using a snowy driveway to work.

Susan Garrett advertises 12 poles in 12 days. I guess that is possible but we have 6 poles and we started around Christmas. I think that is pretty good. One other key, I think to this training, is to keep the training sessions short but frequent. We made our best progress when I had about 4 days off work at Christmas and did 3 or 4 two minute sessions those days.

Good luck, I would recommend buying the transcript of the video if you can.

BTW, we have 6 poles now! :D
 
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