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Oh man.. this has disaster written all over it, i can feel it..

Koda just started her post-op walks yesterday. We start very short distances and increase over time.. i'd say in about.. 4 weeks or so i can start walking her and tuck together.. which would be nice, so i can consolidate my walking time.

Are couplers a good tool or are they only good for well-behaved dogs?

Tuck is pretty good on a leash, but still needs some reminding if he sees something interesting.. people and dogs don't phase him, but a piece of blowing paper or a chippy could get him pulling..

Koda, on the other hand, i'm not sure of yet.. she has pulled, but seems to be better with a martingale collar.

I'm pretty sure she'll be the puller of the two, but i can't really start her in obedience classes until she's fully recovered.

What do you guys use? Two leashes or a coupler?
 

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My sister in law uses a coupler with her dogs. She likes it because when they pull, it bonks their heads together. Built in corrective device! ;)
 

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I tried a coupler on Belle and Kodi at a show a couple of weeks ago. It worked, but it was not fun. I would go with two leashes
 

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I walk three at the same time, all on separate short leashes with martingale collars. M&J never pull but I have to keep reminding Bruno. I found out that if I keep a purse full of small treats, they stay more interested in me than anything else they see.
 

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Two leashes for sure. I often rollerblade with my guys, and I need to have "steering" on both dogs. :)
 

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When it was just Paddy and Seamus I probably could have used a coupler. Their walkies styles were similar. Mosey mosey mosey, investigate grass flowies mole hills, mosey mosey mosey. But I used two leads instead.

With two leads you'll quickly develop some artful maneuvers, not unlike performing ribbon or scarf dances. Lots of overhead weaving and transferring of leads from hand to hand, lots of twirling around to untangle one from the other. It's quite athletic, but over time you will acquire grace, skill, and most of all... safety.

:)
 

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With two leads you'll quickly develop some artful maneuvers, not unlike performing ribbon or scarf dances. Lots of overhead weaving and transferring of leads from hand to hand, lots of twirling around to untangle one from the other. It's quite athletic, but over time you will acquire grace, skill, and most of all... safety.

:)
This is what I do with Champ and Buddy. I try not to go very far with both of them, because Champ alone can pull me right off my feet. Since anything that moves (birds, squirrels, the horses across the road, people, cats, paper, etc.) grabs his interest, I have to be totally alert all the time. Buddy is better behaved (and smaller!), so he is easier to walk alone, though Champ will settle down if corrected soon enough and often enough.
 

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This is what I do with Champ and Buddy. I try not to go very far with both of them, because Champ alone can pull me right off my feet. Since anything that moves (birds, squirrels, the horses across the road, people, cats, paper, etc.) grabs his interest, I have to be totally alert all the time. Buddy is better behaved (and smaller!), so he is easier to walk alone, though Champ will settle down if corrected soon enough and often enough.

Me too! I use two long leads and a halti on Willy if he has a particularly bad day.
 

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Oh! Wanted to add, I also trained both dogs to each "take a side", so Baloo is always on my left and Peanut is always on my right, that way I don't have to worry about tangles.
 

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With two leads you'll quickly develop some artful maneuvers, not unlike performing ribbon or scarf dances. Lots of overhead weaving and transferring of leads from hand to hand, lots of twirling around to untangle one from the other. It's quite athletic, but over time you will acquire grace, skill, and most of all... safety.
You are so descriptive, Nance!! :) Paul walks Tucker and Frankie together and he has mastered this art.

I tried a coupler down the shore last year with Tucker and Frankie. Down 3 flights of stairs from our hotel room. Never again.

I walk my 3 separately everyday, and it's got several benefits :

One-on-one bonding and training time.

Teaching the dog how to heel properly. This is HUGE by the way! Tuck & Frankie heeled perfectly until my dogwalker came along and started walking them together. By walking together, they were all over the place, out in front, to this side or that. I'm in the process of re-training them now. I'll take him for a walk and he'll suddenly bolt out in front of me, or turn into the middle of the road. It's very dangerous!

And lastly - more excercise for me! :)
 

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I like 2 leashes. When we get somewhere that the boys can spend a little time at it allows them to go in opposite directions. Also if we do greet someone I usually hold Sky back because she can get too excited and Moose is just much more socialized. Once Moose finishes his greet I then let Sky visit. If they were on a coupler I would be able to either. Also, I walk with both dogs at my side vs in front - don't think that would work too well with a coupler.
 

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okay, this thread is scaring me

I think Zoe will be the only child. she's already pulled me down the driveway:mad:
 
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