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I find this so very depressing. I can't believe that all those people's trains were more important than a free concert from Josh Bell!

"It was the most astonishing thing I've ever seen in Washington," Furukawa says. "Joshua Bell was standing there playing at rush hour, and people were not stopping, and not even looking, and some were flipping quarters at him! Quarters! I wouldn't do that to anybody. I was thinking, Omigosh, what kind of a city do I live in that this could happen?"
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Cliffs Notes version -

The Washington Post hosted a semi-experiment in which acclaimed classical violinist Joshua Bell, playing a $3 million Stradavarius, went to the L'Enfant Plaza Metro stop on a January Friday and played during rush hour. This artist, in concert, gets upwards of $1,000 an hour in standing-room only settings.

A thousand people walked right by him. Some tossed coins or bills into his case. A shoeshine woman who usually calls the police on musicians in the station (they make it too hard for her to hear her customers), decided not to, for some reason. ONE person -- a worker for the Commerce Dept -- recognized him. She stood for a while and placed $20 in his case.

All in all, he made $37 for an hour's work, some in pennies.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I thought the idea that CONTEXT MATTERS was really fascinating, Nathan, evidenced by the comments about moving a painting from the National Gallery to a local restaurant and tagging it for $150.

I also smiled at the notion that KIDS seemed to 'get' it when their parents either didn't have the time or the inclination to.

And as someone who's struggling what to do w/music abilities of his own (albeit not in the same universe as Bell's), I found this really meaningful (from the postal supervisor who played violin as a kid but gave up on the dream): "If you love something but choose not to do it professionally, it's not a waste. Because, you know, you still have it. You have it forever."
 

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Great article (skimmed through some). Haven't watched the vids yet...will definitely watch at home.


And as someone who's struggling what to do w/music abilities of his own (albeit not in the same universe as Bell's), I found this really meaningful (from the postal supervisor who played violin as a kid but gave up on the dream): "If you love something but choose not to do it professionally, it's not a waste. Because, you know, you still have it. You have it forever."
that quote stood out for me. :)
Thanks for sharing Dan. Very interesting.
 

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A blog I read talked about this yesterday. I didn't read the Washington Post article, but just what she summarized of it, I found fascinating.

She said that every child wanted to stop. Wonder if that is because as adults we're so focused on where we need to be and when that we can't stop to appreciate what's going on around us?

Here she is - I'm no expert on writing, but I think she's fabulous.

http://julia.typepad.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Melissa said:
Here she is - I'm no expert on writing, but I think she's fabulous.
She *is* fabulous. BLAAAAAATT!

The Washington Post article says kids have a predisposition toward music because in utero, Mom's lub-dub, lub-dub heartbeat mimics iambic pentameter. Wouldn't that lead to a predisposition toward Shakespeare instead?? ??
 

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dweck said:
I thought the idea that CONTEXT MATTERS was really fascinating, Nathan, evidenced by the comments about moving a painting from the National Gallery to a local restaurant and tagging it for $150.
Oh, I absolutely agree, and I also agree that it was a terrific, well-written article. But *I'd* sure stop for Josh, even if I'd be late for a meeting! Although I'm probably not the target demographic.
 
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