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Those of you that have chosen this option for your lab-

Any regrets, complications, long term issues? Manteo is scheduled for TPLO at Ohio State University, and Traditional Repair at a very good local ortho surgeon. We will cxl one of the appointments once we decide. She is a very high energy lab and we are trying to make the best decision for her. Our vet keeps pushing traditional. We made him call OSU and describe the history of her injury, and the surgeon there said that TPLO would be better for her. I have been on the Orthodog yahoo group, but I thought I would check here since most of you seem to be going with TPLO.

Thanks,

Cheri
 

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Thankfully, I have never been there with any of my dogs, but I was with a friend who took her older golden to a very good ortho surgeon who described the differences in the surgery, made a recommendation, and she chose TPLO. The surgery was very successful. If I were you, I would consult with the OSU ortho vet and get all the info you need for the best route for Manteo taking into account her age and activity level. Good luck and please keep us posted.
 

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Our middle beagle had TPLO surgery on both legs (about a year or so apart). The hardest thing was keeping him inactive post surgery. He spent a lot of time in a playpen in the living room. One long term thing I have noticed is that when it is really cold or damp (now keep in mind I'm in No. California so really cold for us is the low 30's) or he has been really running a lot at the dog park he starts limping. It only lasts a couple days. The only other long term is a very sloppy sit and when he lays down he keeps his legs straight along his sides. It looks very uncomfortable but it doesnt seem to bother him.
 

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Magnum had traditional surgery when she was five years old. She was competing in agility. We took half a year off and she went back to the agility field and completed a bunch of titles before we retired her. She is nine years old now and a bit stiff but otherwise runs and plays every morning with her brothers. She had one knee done. I have heard that with TPLO they will often blow out the other knee after the surgery because the angle is changed so dramatically on the surgical leg, it effects the other leg. But I haven't had that issue so all I can do is tell you what I've heard.

Good luck with your surgery.
 

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We have an Ortho vet in our area that runs agility with Flat coats. I have talked to her about the TPLO and she says that it has very good outcomes for performance dogs. There are a couple of agility dogs that are back running agility after having that repair done.
This isthe one time I would want the best surgeon to do the surgery though, because this is a very technical type of surgery, the X-rays have to be done perfectly so the measurements can be made accurately and then there is alot of measurements done while in surgery. The agility people from Southern Calif, tend to drive to the one surgeon in Pheonix AZ for the surgery, an 8 hour trip one way.
 

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I have heard that with TPLO they will often blow out the other knee after the surgery because the angle is changed so dramatically on the surgical leg, it effects the other leg.
I have also heard that as well. I've never experienced it first hand, but the vet I work for does a lot of orthopedic surgery, so I've seen the outcomes. Of course there are pros and cons for all types of surgery, so you just have to find the one that's best for you, which is not always easy.

I wish you the best of luck with your decision and that whatever surgery you choose is complication-free and successful!
 

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We had both legs done - no issues except recently with below zero weather. I think the plates got too cold and Tank could not walk. But then again he is 11 1/2 :)
 

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the black lab in my siggy pic will be 10 weeks post op tomorrow.
i rescued him at the beginning of sept. with a broken leg (left leg) that had to be surgically repaired. 6 weeks into that healing he tore the acl in his right knee and was in surgery for a TPLO the following week.
i think it all depends on your dog. i chose TPLO for jax after talking to lab owners/breeders that had it recently done. also his age and activity played a big part. he's only two and very active.
he healed beautifully. i kept him crated all day while at work; he came out for leash walks to potty and walk around the family room/den area in the evenings and then back in the crate for nighttime.
i feel very blessed and happy with the outcome of jax's surgery on BOTH legs and am very happy in choosing the TPLO vs. the traditional.
i went with an ortho surgeon that was new to my area and got a great discount but still expensive. and yes, there is usually a 40% chance they will blow the other knee....
 

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I have heard that with TPLO they will often blow out the other knee after the surgery because the angle is changed so dramatically on the surgical leg, it effects the other leg.
Our vet told us he would probably have to have surgery on the other leg (which he did), because of the way he was walking while he was injured. Maybe it's a combination of the two?
 

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It has been just over a year since Sky's TPLO and she has done just fine. The hard part is the 6 weeks that they can't do anything -but it went by fast and she did fine.
 

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I personally would not opt for a TPLO repair if I were faced with a torn cruciate in one of my dogs. First off the chances of the other knee going is higher when a dog has a TPLO done on one (it's always a risk when one goes but it's significantly higher with the TPLO method vs traditional) and secondly there are more side effects and complications involved. I read where the plates should be removed in the future or else the dog is at a much higher risk of bone cancer and risk of infection is much higher as well. Then lastly is the cost - the cost of a TPLO can be staggering $2500 - $3500 vs traditional at $1200 - $1800. I have seen many dogs that underwent the traditional repair remain very active and live long normal sound lives.

Surgeons push the TPLO and can make an owner feel like if they don't choose it then they are not doing what's best. We all want what's best right? Well that doesn't always mean shelling out more money. The TPLO is a patented procedure meaning the surgeon must pay to attend the schooling and purchase the equipment from Slocum (the company that patented the procedure) hence the higher cost when it trickles down to you.

Also the outcome has a lot to do with the surgeon and I personally would opt for a traditional under the hands of a well respected orthopedic surgeon who does 5 - 10 per week.
 

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sharon, you are the only lab breeder I have heard say this.
I also checked into the "cancer" thing. Facts are they were using non-medical grade plates "back when". The inventor had everything that had to be done under their eye; isn't that way any more...so things have changed.
Again, I'm very happy with the choices I made and the healing; but wanted to set the record straight about here about the cancer thing. It was something I definitely asked about and felt reassured with the answers.

edited to also say all that about having to be trained by slocum is "back then" stuff, too. not that way any more.
 

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sharon, you are the only lab breeder I have heard say this.
The TPLO method has worked very well for a lot of dogs so nobody should second guess their decisions. I prefaced my reply with the fact that my opinion reflects what I would do - I am not telling anyone else what to do.

Four dogs owned by breeders/friends of mine had traditional repairs done in the last 8 months. One is back up and running and will be shown next month. It's much more common in my circle for people to recommend a traditional repair by a skilled surgeon than a TPLO.

The idea that the TPLO is better for active breeds is based on Slocum's experience and not long term research comparing the two - there is no long term studies done on this.

My orthopedic veterinarian recommends the TPLO although he does more traditional repairs. I have had many conversations with him comparing the two. Bottom line is that he went to Slocum's school and just quotes what they told him. He doesn't have any concrete data comparing the two either and admits that his traditional repairs do just as well as his TPLOs.

Every 5 - 10 years a "new" method comes out but tried and true monofilament stabilization techniques have served many dogs well for decades. The TTA method (tibial tuberosity advancement) is now said to be better than the TPLO.


http://www.lab-retriever.net/board/tplo-awareness-slocum-t14149.html
 

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The type of surgery is a personal choice, but when I had to make the decision for myself and my dog back in 2001, I didn't hesitate to do TPLO. IMO, and granted it is just my opinion, I wouldn't do the traditional surgery on a Lab. My ortho vet who does both types of CCL surgeries won't do a traditional on a Lab anymore. They just do not seem to hold up as the TPLO ones do.
 

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I just want to add also, the decision was never mine with Magnum. The surgeon told me he wouldn't make a decision until he opened her up to see what he was working with. He opted to do the traditional at that time. She had a clean tear with no damage to the joint. He felt a traditional would serve her better knowing what I did with her and the damage she had presented to him.

I am not qualified to make that kind of decision. I have no real medical/vet training, so I trusted my doc. I am pleased with the outcome and if I were face with it again, I think I would hope traditional would work for us again.

I also know that my surgeon pretty much poo poo'd the rehab care that you read so much about after. He recommended that I NOT crate her. He told me she would know how much she could use the leg, and that's exactly how it went. She was using her leg 3 days after the surgery and healing progressed quickly. I did swim her (after the stitches were out) and I think that helped her as well.

She was very physically fit and active going into the surgery, at the top of her game really, and I think that made all the difference as well.

Good luck with whatever surgery you have. Sending best thoughts for a speedy and quick recovery.
 

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believe me, i went over this with my own vet as well as the ortho surgeon who did the surgery. this surgeon gave me the option of the tradition and the tplo. he didn't do any of the new, i believe TTA. he gave me all the history of slocum and how they had to be trained in the past, etc. that is NO LONGER the case. he did say they did research on those dogs with cancer and all of those had plates that were directly from slocum and were NON medical grade.

my own vet told me the dogs she had seen come through her office that had tplo's vs. trad's...she could tell by how the dog walked in which they had and the ones that had tplo's had favored much better in the long run.

i agree with labby; it is a personal decision and i am not trying to tell someone to go one way or the other. i did what i felt was best for my dog based on all the data and research i received along with taking into consideration his age and activity.
i'm very happy that at 8 weeks his bone was totally healed! :)
 

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i never heard of TPLO being the cause for the other knee to go.. koda had both of hers done via traditional and the way i learned, it was common for the second knee to go because if a dog is born with one knee growing at a weird angle, often the other one will as well.. not because of the surgery itself..

That being said.. both of koda's were blown by the time she had the first surgery.. so she had both done within 13 weeks of the other.. that was fun, let me tell you.

As of now, she's great.. nothing seems to affect her, including weather and she'll run circles around my 7 year old with perfect knees.. so...
 

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my own vet told me the dogs she had seen come through her office that had tplo's vs. trad's...she could tell by how the dog walked in which they had and the ones that had tplo's had favored much better in the long run.
I can definitely see now that Magnum's gait is different, she has a bit of a rolling gate in the back end.

However, I have read research that they've done on traditional vs TPLO years after, and they had dogs walk across pressure plates in the floor. All of the traditional dogs used the leg more (i.e., put more weight on the leg) than the TPLO dogs did, but many of the traditional dogs did have the "rolling" gate that I've mentioned (this is were I first learned of it and then recognized it in my own dog).

And you know what... we all know WAY too much about this stuff anyway ;)

I honestly feel both procedures are fine, and I would go with whatever my dogs surgeon felt was the best for my dog.
 

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and sharon...the link you posted was from paolo back in 2004...again...much has changed in 6 years. trust me...i was one of those mommies that went it with all the info from the internet and others who had been through this...he answered every one of those points and many others that i did not even know about.
 

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linda, i agree. i just don't want anyone who is thinking of having a TPLO done think it's not a good method to use because of outdated info. ;)
 
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