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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I got a notice the other day that my Topsy-Turvey planters will be shipped in 2 to 4 weeks. So, I made my own. :D Our side of the unit is where you see the wheelbarrow and dog crate. The other side of the fence is my neighbor's.

the garden of delights


tomato, green beans and a tomato, cukes, green beans, green pepper, tomato, cukes


Here's a close-up of one of the 5-gallon buckets. Bill said the handle alone would not be strong enough to hold it, so we added a chain.
 

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Wow you are inventive. Have you done this before?
Nope! A girlfriend of mine sent me pics of two 5-gallon buckets that someone had turned into planters, and I decided to make my own since we had buckets and plant pots all over the place. Of course, Bill did the drilling of holes and cutting the chain to fit, but I did the rest with the help of Kim, my neighbor. :D
 

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The Topsyturvy ads on TV & in Sunday supplements look interesting BUT different varieties of tomatos have such widely different flavors and appeal that I was afraid to try them. So I'll be very curious to hear how well these come out. Thank you for experimenting.

I have 3 large pots (probably 12-18 gallon sizes) for 3 tomato plants ([email protected] Jetstar, Avalanche, 1st Lady) on my back patio and adequately tying them up is sometimes a problem to keep stems from breaking under the load of fruit.

Upside down would solve that problem but I'm not sure that 5 gallons would be enough soil or that all varieties would adapt to growing their roots upward and stems downward.

Possibly daily watering using some of the chemicals/nutrients used in hydroponic gardening could solve the problem of limited soil. I think varieties may differ in how adaptable they are for roots growing opposite to the force of gravity but I'm guessing the stems would be okay. (You might Google hydroponic garden nutrients)

PLEASE, let us know what the results are, how it turns out. And which varieties were more and which were less successful.

 

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The Topsyturvy ads on TV & in Sunday supplements look interesting BUT different varieties of tomatos have such widely different flavors and appeal that I was afraid to try them. So I'll be very curious to hear how well these come out. Thank you for experimenting.

I have 3 large pots (probably 12-18 gallon sizes) for 3 tomato plants ([email protected] Jetstar, Avalanche, 1st Lady) on my back patio and adequately tying them up is sometimes a problem to keep stems from breaking under the load of fruit.

Upside down would solve that problem but I'm not sure that 5 gallons would be enough soil or that all varieties would adapt to growing their roots upward and stems downward.

Possibly daily watering using some of the chemicals/nutrients used in hydroponic gardening could solve the problem of limited soil. I think varieties may differ in how adaptable they are for roots growing opposite to the force of gravity but I'm guessing the stems would be okay.

PLEASE, let us know what the results are, how it turns out. And which varieties were more and which were less successful.
I will post regular updates. The tomatoes are two different vartieties, Celebrity and Super something-or-other. I'm very interested to see how the beans and cukes and peppers do, too.

I've tried growing them in regular pots, but our side of the duplex faces east and they just didn't get enough sun. I can't put pots out back because there's a landscaping crew that does our yard and they mow over everything that isn't nailed down. If we're not here to pick up the pots and put them out of harm's way, they are decimated. So, I decided to experiment!
 

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I have seen advertisment on the topsy-turvey. How clever! Nothing better then home grown
 

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I'd like to try that but I'm not sure how I'd hang them...all I have is a shepherd's hook. Anyone have any good ideas?
 

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I'd like to try that but I'm not sure how I'd hang them...all I have is a shepherd's hook. Anyone have any good ideas?
A shepherd's crook should work if it is tall enough. Just make the hanger part very short so the container is as close to the hook as you can get it, to leave more room for the plant to hang. Try one - what have you got to lose? ;)
 

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You clever girl!
I agree. I think next weekend I will take a couple of 5 gallon buckets and try summer tomatoes in them. I will hang them from the lowest branch of my mulberry tree. That way they will get lots of morning sun but not the afternoon as it is so hot in Phoenix. I didn't want to spend the money on the planters because I figure the summer sun here would cause them to rot. But the 5 call buckets are free so all it will cost is a little light weight soil and a couple of tomato plants.
 

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It needs to be a very sturdy Shepperd hook if it is as heavy as my Topsy turvys are.
I had to tie the shepperd hooks to a fence to brace them. When I first planted the tomato it was fun watching the leaves (which were upside down ) turn so that they were right side up.
 

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The Topsyturvy ads on TV & in Sunday supplements look interesting BUT different varieties of tomatos have such widely different flavors and appeal that I was afraid to try them. So I'll be very curious to hear how well these come out. Thank you for experimenting.

I have 3 large pots (probably 12-18 gallon sizes) for 3 tomato plants ([email protected] Jetstar, Avalanche, 1st Lady) on my back patio and adequately tying them up is sometimes a problem to keep stems from breaking under the load of fruit.

Upside down would solve that problem but I'm not sure that 5 gallons would be enough soil or that all varieties would adapt to growing their roots upward and stems downward.

Possibly daily watering using some of the chemicals/nutrients used in hydroponic gardening could solve the problem of limited soil. I think varieties may differ in how adaptable they are for roots growing opposite to the force of gravity but I'm guessing the stems would be okay. (You might Google hydroponic garden nutrients)

PLEASE, let us know what the results are, how it turns out. And which varieties were more and which were less successful.
I (and other gardeners that I know) have been using this method to grow tomatoes and other vine plants for years and I can tell you it works just fine. Fertilize as you would if planted normally and water regularly. I use the 5 gallon buckets, but I put the lid back on with a smallish hole for watering. The lid helps reduce water evaporation, which is a problem particular to container gardening.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I (and other gardeners that I know) have been using this method to grow tomatoes and other vine plants for years and I can tell you it works just fine. Fertilize as you would if planted normally and water regularly. I use the 5 gallon buckets, but I put the lid back on with a smallish hole for watering. The lid helps reduce water evaporation, which is a problem particular to container gardening.
Thanks for that tip. :) I don't have lids for all these, so I will make sure to water daily.

Does it make a difference if I water morning, noon, or night? I know regular gardens are best watered at dusk, but does it make a difference with the upside-down planters?
 

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I like to water at dusk so that you don't lose so much water to evaporation quickly, as you do during the hottest hours of the day. I would check the buckets daily for a while until you get e feel for how quickly they dry out and then water accordingly. I know here, I don't have to water them daily, but when I lived in the Okanagan I did.
 

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Something you could do to help keep the moisture in, since you don't have lids, is you could put some bark mulch in the tops of the buckets. If you want to get creative, you could also plant some basket stuffers on top to help retain moisture. Trailing petunias would look fantastic. With additional planting, you'd need to fertilize a bit more.
 

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I did this a couple of weeks ago with an old Killz bucket. My tomato plant is growing wonderfully. Interesting about putting the top back on for moisture control. I'll have to see if I can find the top.
 

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How inventive!! I have 2 of the TT planters, I will be hanging them off our deck posts, just need to get the hooks. I will do one with tomatoes and one with peppers I think!
 
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