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Discussion Starter #1
What do you do while your dog is having a siezure ? I think Paddysmom mentioned once some type of message she did during a siezure..... my friend has a Golden Retriever that has had 2 siezures now.... her Vet wants her to keep a log on them before doiing tests.....neither one of us has ever had a dog have siezure, so I wanted to ask you all....... any info would be much appreciated.

thanks


Melissa
 

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Our previous pet was epileptic. If he was not on the floor, we would move him there and clear the area of anything that he might hit and hurt himself. Then we would get down on the floor with him and hold him in a comforting way, not restrictive. We always felt he was frightened by what was happening or what had just happened. Watching for the potential of swallowing tongue is always prudent. Not much else you can do other than keep hazards out of the way and provide some comfort.
 

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Be very careful as some dogs will fear bite when seizing. I have witnessed two seizures and the dog was dazed and made pawing motions with his front paws. A dogs temperature will rise after a seizure. Good luck to your friend.
 

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Our previous pet was epileptic. If he was not on the floor, we would move him there and clear the area of anything that he might hit and hurt himself. Then we would get down on the floor with him and hold him in a comforting way, not restrictive. We always felt he was frightened by what was happening or what had just happened. Watching for the potential of swallowing tongue is always prudent. Not much else you can do other than keep hazards out of the way and provide some comfort.
In addition to this, tell them to keep a diary detailing the events leading up to the seizure. If there are any contributing factors, they will show up when they're written down. Some of the things that can set them off are: over-excitement (excessive playing, running around, barking or maybe children chasing them around) Fear (thunderstorms, being woken up too quickly, threatening behaviour towards the dog) or any one of a dozen other events. They can even take a seizure in their sleep but it's important to try & determine a cause (if any) so that the problem can be eliminated & lessen the chance of it happening. They also need to keep a record of times & dates to show the frequency of how often it happens. All this info will be a big help to the vet when determining what drugs to give & the dosage. The most common treatment is with Phenobarb but maybe you have something better where you are.

Also, it's important that they don't 'transmit' their anxiety to the dog. The best thing they can do is follow the above advice & let the dog come around in his own time. If the dog senses their anxiety, he will only become worse.

I've had 2 dogs that were epileptic. One was one of my Pugs who was born with it & one of our old Chihuahuas who took his first fit @ 15. He lived until he was 19 with a lot of TLC. Once you learn how to manage the problem, there is no reason why the dog shouldn't lead a normal happy life.

Please keep us posted re his progress.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thankyou SO much for the great info ! Occular compression is what I was thinking of ..... GREAT link... thanks..... and Garth, thankyou too for the excellent information...... my friend is VERY worried, as she's never had a dog that had a siezure..... very frightening .... I'll let you know if and when they figure something out...... thanks !

Melissa
 

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Melissa, I found the entire canine-epilepsy.com site to be invaluable. It might help your friend to read through the whole thing.
 

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Just re-read your OP. How old is the dog? Do they still keep in contact with the breeder? If so, it's important that they be told of this in case it's genetic. IF it is & they were caring responsible breeders, they would stop breeding from that line to prevent future dogs & their owners from going through this. :( If they don't care, then they'll keep on breeding regardless. This is how you learn what breeders you can trust & which ones to run from.
 

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I agree that if this dog is from working or breeding stock the breeder should be made aware. But I slightly disagree, Garth, that the parents would necessarily be washed out. Idiopathic epilepsy is just that--idiopathic--and although there can be a strong genetic component, it's not always the case. I recently had a long conversation with Theo's breeder about this. His mom has never had a seizure (she's 12 now--Theo's litter was her last), and none of her other puppies were ever reported to have seizures. His dad has been used EVERYWHERE, and she wasn't aware of an uptick of reports of seizures. (Everyone would know his name if I mentioned it.) Should he not be used anymore because of one report of seizures?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I think she said the dog is 6 or 7 yrs. old. I'll inquire about the breeder. Thanks again, for the great information.
 
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