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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious, it seems like alot of people here have a rottie and labs. Who here does? I am asking cuz when we get our next dog (not for atleast 1.5-2 more years) Sam and I were thinking of a rottie. Do these two breeds get along particularl well or something? I am just curious cuz almost everyone I meet who has a lab has a rott or vice versa. What are the similarities and differences between labs?
 

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THe breed usually doesn't matter....it's the personality of the dog.
 

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I don't have a Rottie but I do like them a lot. Their "look" is very much my kind of dog. There is nothing quite like a well bred, athletic Rottie to turn your head.

I have met some really nasty ones (just like I have met some really nasty Labs) but know several very sweet ones. A beautiful ***** named Papaya is one of my dogs favorite playmates. She was born near to when my Joker was so she is about 2 1/2. Shes HUGE but an absolute doll.
Also, because I live in a small village, one of the local store owners brings her Rottie to work with her. Her name is Gemma. My dogs LOVE playing with her as she likes to rough house.

I think one of the problems with Rottweilers is the stigma that is attached them. I know the lady who owns Papaya has suffered verbal abuse, people screaming/running across the street to get away from her, etc., and all because there is a well behaved Rottie at the end of the leash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes the whole stigma with rotties I don't get. Weren't they bred to pull carts and not to be dog fighters? Why is every one so scared of them???

Sam and I would wait until we have our own home until we would get a rottie, I wouldn't want to deal with ignorant landlords who don't allow rotties. All the rotties I have ever met have been big, huge, silly, goofy, gentle, lugs. I think a rottie would fit right in with our home, and with apollo. Of course we would get a puppy, and that pup would get a TON of obedience courses, etc. Apollo will be sooo excited to have a baby brother/sister. but like I said there wont be any new animals in our home for a while (atleast 1.5-2 years) so plenty of time to research what type of dog to get to be a playmate to apollo.
 

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What are the similarities and differences between labs?
Someone who has owned Rottweilers can probably answer this better, but although I find some similarities between them, they are also very different. At least from the Rott's we know one thing I notice is they share a play style -- rough, in your face play that is not usually tolerated by other breeds. Both Labs and Rotts are very loyal and obedient. Rottweilers are more aloof with strangers and, unlike Labs, a well bred one can make a great guard dog.
 

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Yes the whole stigma with rotties I don't get. Weren't they bred to pull carts and not to be dog fighters? Why is every one so scared of them???
Incidents like this, sadly:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/leicestershire/5375520.stm

I can imagine the physical presence of a Rottweiler would frighten someone who is not familiar with them. They are such a powerful breed. The media and movies portraying them as vicious "devil dogs" makes it far worse. Add to that the idiots who own them for nothing but image/macho status and you have a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
OMG thats terrible. I hate it when people aren't responsible and children get hurt.

There was an incident where some negligent parents left their pet ferret alone in a room with their infant child. The child started crying and the ferret either got upset or protective and tried to drag the baby off to a safe "den" and wound up biting off the babies toe(s). People blamed the ferret, calling it 'vicious' when really it was the PARENTS that were to blame for their neglegance. Of course for a while after that everyone was convinced that ferrets were "evil".

I wish people were more responsible and accountable for their animals.
 

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We had a Rott at my parents for a long time. My parents had to put her down a few months ago but she was part of my life for 10 years. We got her as a puppy from a liter my grandparents had. We always said she would lick a stranger to death before ever biting them. She only growled one time that I can remeber and that was when she had a huge bone with meat on it and did not want anyone to take it from her. She was a lot bigger than my lab Maggie. Reba (the Rott) out weighed her by a good 30-40 pounds. They only met once and it was right before Reba was put to sleep but they got along fine. When it comes to Rotts I really think their temperment and attitude is somthing you help develop. Since I was so young and I don't really remember Reba before she got older so I can't talk about their play style and energy level.

Trickster: Maggie is actually a pretty good guard dog for a lab. She will abark and hair standing up for anyone that comes to our house or if we are on walks. It's funny bc she doesn't act this way at the park or the vet. She has never snapped at someone or even growled. She is just very jumpy and loud and bc she is black peopple get very scared of her. Everyone says she is a great guard dog. Now this isnt what we wanted its just what we have. We have gone to training and introduce her to new people every chance we get. It has helped some but the problem isn't solved yet. She was a rescue, but we got her at 10 weeks so I'm not really sure why she acts like this. Any thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I certainly think that bigger more powerful breeds of dogs require EXTENSIVE exposure to various people, places, animals, children, etc Obedience classes are DEFINTILY a must and you need to be completely in control of your dog. I think if people are responsible, big dogs/powerful dogs can be great family memebers, but the owner needs to be on top of their dog's obedience skills and people/animal skills.
 

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There is a beautiful Rottie at the HS I volenteer at now names Julius he's such a sweetie. Pretty good on leash and very lovey. He's limping though and has something wrong with his front shoulder it's got quite a bit of muscle loss I hope they can help him he's such a doll. I think if they are well bred and raised in a loving environment they are great dogs.
 

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Trickster: Maggie is actually a pretty good guard dog for a lab. She will abark and hair standing up for anyone that comes to our house or if we are on walks. It's funny bc she doesn't act this way at the park or the vet. She has never snapped at someone or even growled. She is just very jumpy and loud and bc she is black peopple get very scared of her. Everyone says she is a great guard dog. Now this isnt what we wanted its just what we have. We have gone to training and introduce her to new people every chance we get. It has helped some but the problem isn't solved yet. She was a rescue, but we got her at 10 weeks so I'm not really sure why she acts like this. Any thoughts?
How is she with strangers? a typical goofy Lab? or is she fearful/very reserved?

There is a big difference between a dog that alarm barks (most but certainly not all dogs do this) and a dog that is barking aggressively through fear. For example, my Labs bark when strangers come into the house or when our front door or side gate opens but after a 'hello' they are all wagging and happy to see the new arrival. They don't hide away or continue to persue the stranger with aggressive barking.
 

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I grew up with little dogs, except for one collie mix stray we took in. My first big dog was a Rott. I had bought him for my first husband. I did buy him from a reputable breeder and he was the biggest baby. I had small kids and did home daycare at the time. He was the best dog. When I got divorced I made the mistake and of letting my ex keep him. He was staying with his mom and supposedly he got stolen out of their backyard. I was so mad at him.
 

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Trickster said:
Trickster: Maggie is actually a pretty good guard dog for a lab. She will abark and hair standing up for anyone that comes to our house or if we are on walks. It's funny bc she doesn't act this way at the park or the vet. She has never snapped at someone or even growled. She is just very jumpy and loud and bc she is black peopple get very scared of her. Everyone says she is a great guard dog. Now this isnt what we wanted its just what we have. We have gone to training and introduce her to new people every chance we get. It has helped some but the problem isn't solved yet. She was a rescue, but we got her at 10 weeks so I'm not really sure why she acts like this. Any thoughts?
How is she with strangers? a typical goofy Lab? or is she fearful/very reserved?

There is a big difference between a dog that alarm barks (most but certainly not all dogs do this) and a dog that is barking aggressively through fear. For example, my Labs bark when strangers come into the house or when our front door or side gate opens but after a 'hello' they are all wagging and happy to see the new arrival. They don't hide away or continue to persue the stranger with aggressive barking.
She does fine once they allow her to sniff them and they pet her. I just wish she didn't scare people away from her. We always have her on a leash when a new person comes over. And actually she does growl when she sees someone walking by the house. But when someone enters the home her tail is wagging the whole time she is barking her head off. She has never given me a reason to think she would harm someone. And even though she only see my family a few times a year she remembers them and there is no barking. The one thing I think might have contributed to this behavior is that we lived in an apt her first year (which was our first year in a new state). Nobody in our apt spoke English so we did not have people coming over or have much interaction since we didn't know anyone. We are now in a house and she is getting better with the neighbors as she sees them more and more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
There has got to be more members with Rotts and Labs. I'm bumping this so that they can add their input.
 

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I had Rotts before my Labs. I adore the breed...still do. I chose not to get another one once Thor died because 1) his sudden death almost killed me (he was my heart dog) and 2) for what Trickster said about stigma. People would cross the street to avoid walking past us. We could clear out aisles in Petsmart faster than anyone. Yes there are other people out there that will cross the street just to be able to pet the Rotts (me ;D ) but they are in the minority.

Murray's girlfriend is a Rottie named Drew. I think the biggest attraction is the similar play style (rough, tumble, body slamming, chasing, wrestling, bitey face, lots of growly trash talkin' ). My friend's Dobie's are a lot less physical in their play style.

I cannot stress enough that Rotts need a consistent and firm hand and lots of on going (life time) training/socialization. So many people do not train these dogs as pups then are frustrated when try to get control of a 100+# adult animal. It is never going to turn out well. You cannot let your guard down with this breed or they will walk all over you and everyone else. If you won't lead, they will and their dictatorship is not easy to overthrow. ;)

Something else to consider is that Labs are bred to work with people. They look to you for direction and want to please. Rotts are much more independent thinkers. They love you but they don't need you. They can (and will) figure it out on their own so they can be a challenge at times. You say left and they say right. ;)

Labs love everyone. Rotts are very family oriented and very aloof with strangers. Aloof does not mean aggressive. Aloof means they are constantly on guard and suspect of anyone they don't know. This means don't let strangers walk up and grab you in a bear hug or they will have some teeth attached to their butt pretty quickly. This doesn't need to be trained. It is instinctive. They will protect their pack to the end. This can present problems especially when children are involved. Dogs can't distinguish between screams of joy and screams of terror so this can cause problems (the ones frequently heard on the news) when some visiting neighbor kid gets bit after chasing and tackling little Johnny. Also, Rotts were originally bred as drover dogs. They herd cattle. This instinct is still alive and well in Rotts so they have been known to herd children and other animals. Nothing more terrifying to a kid then to have a 100 lb dog chasing them nipping at them. They can also have high prey drive. Combine the 2 (herding w/prey drive) and you usually get another nightly news story.

Rotts are on the black list (as well as Dobies, Chows, GSD, etc). You will find it difficult to find a place to rent or own because you cannot get insurance. I actually fear in the very near future that Rotts will be banned in cities/states just like Pitt Bulls are now. The breeds will be extinguished one by one. :'(

I didn't mean for this to sound so bad. It's just important, no matter what breed you are researching, to understand what the dog was bred to do so you understand the liabilities associated with owning the dog. If you choose to get a breed like a Rott, my only request is that you become an ambassador for the breed. This means a commitment to training and socialization to prove to the public, if only one person at a time, that these are good dogs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I knew by your screen name that you'd give a good answer ;)

Yes, if Sam and i DO decide to get a rottie, we most certainly will have that pup in firm control. I know the stigma of agression will be attached to the pup, but I want to make sure that that stigma is totally unfounded (ie that my pup is not the steriotypical rottie) I still dunno if I want a rottie, the stigma thing really irks me. We would wait until we bought our own home to get one, I didn't realize they could deny you insurance even if you own and own a rottie! omg!
 
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