Just Labradors banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,694 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
haha, don't freak guys, TRUST ME I am SO not interested in breeding, I am just intrigued by it, kinda like watching shows on Animal Planet.

Breeding seems like a TON of work, I personally could never ever do it, but I was curious about some info on it just for the hell of it. I bet if the general public knew all the responses to the questions below, they'd seriously reconsider breeding irresponsibly. Please note that I ONLY want responses from the reputable breeders on this board, if you are a BYB (backyard breeder) I have NO INTEREST whatsoever in your responses to these questions.

1. What type of work goes into determining what dogs to breed to each other? Like how do you pick which two dogs would produce the best pups if bred together.

2. What's it like to go through birthing with your dog? How often do c-sections occur?

3. Do you ever have puppies that get sick? What is that like? heartwrenching I'd imagine.

4. What happens if you can't place all the puppies?

5. Do you ever get criticized by rescue organizations for not helping with the pet overpopulation problem?

Thanks guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,623 Posts
I'll try to answer for me.
1) Years in some cases. First, you need to be patient and wait for your ***** to mature so you know what you've got to work with! Then be honest enough in your assessment (after all the clearances are done-- hips, elbows, CERFs, heart and now the PRA gene test is a biggie...) of what your *****'s attributes and weaknesses are. How you learn that is thru competition in part. Trainability, temperament, comformation all go into it. If, for instance, I have an overly "soft" tempered girl, I will put her w/ a very happy, outgoing confident male. I've worked on "fronts" over the years.... so the male always has to have a great front, but not at the expense of the rear as my rears have been excellent (well, my dogs' rears, not mine :p). Of course health behind the dog... longevity... joints, cancer, allergies, etc. Looks are important if you want to maintain or create a kennel "type". For instance... I have 2 half sisters that would fool most into thinking that I did tight linebreedings... which I haven't! Mine are all outcrosses (note, I'm doing a very distant linebreeding this time around but most folks wouldnt consider it as much).
2) It's hell. Plain and simple. I'm up for ~3 days straight, feel like I've been on a drunken binge... it's just plain indescribable as you know if you fall asleep at the wrong time you could lose your *****.... I've not yet had a C-section but try to maintain that attribute in my lines. I'm worried as heck about the girl I have that is due 4/28 though as she's short coupled and VERY big.... I'm watching a bunch of kicking right now. Her measurements are running 1-2 wks ahead of her sister, mom's and gram's.... I think because she's more short loined so has less room. But worry, yes you bet! Btw, I was out the door ready to load up 2x last fall w/ her full sis but she had the problem pups (1st 2 born) in the garage while being threatened w/ the "vet" word... 1 and 2 am on a Sunday no less, so that meant the Emergency Clinic. I think just the "V" word convinced her to get a move on, LOL. Basically what I'm trying to say is that my ***** is far more important to save than anything else--- I made that decision to breed her and nothing will step in my way to make sure she's okay.
3) Yes, I had one pup that came down w/ HOD (hypertrophic osteodystrophy) at ~9 wks old (at the new puppy home). It was horrible. I paid for all of her expenses, but her lower jaw was permanently disfigured. I will make sure they get another pup free of charge when the time comes they want one, even though it wasn't likely genetic at all (could have been vaccines or just a metabolic freak of nature). It just twisted me.... she's fine now, all except the lower jaw that is. She also was the last born, and didn't thrive quite like the others, so I keep thinking it was my fault for bottle feeding and perhaps getting her metabolism out of whack.
4) I always have a long list of interested buyers before whelping (and sometimes before breeding!) so this has not been a problem really. If I do have someone fall thru, no biggie. The pup will stay here until a good home comes along and in the meantime, will be trained just as it is my own.
5) I have, but they quickly get corrected. I did ALOT of rescue foster and still work on the sidelines for rescue.
Hope this helps! Thanks for asking... I'm not alone, btw... have several friends in my breed clubs that feel and do the same. :) -Anne
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,694 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Wow, thanks for the great answers. Like I said I'm not interested in breeding, myself but I have great respect for people who breed properly. BYBs...well...i don't have words for them. Thanks for the interesting info! Any other legit breeders out there wann add your contributions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,548 Posts
1. What type of work goes into determining what dogs to breed to each other? Like how do you pick which two dogs would produce the best pups if bred together.
Years of researching pedigrees. Then sometimes you just get a gut feeling and go with it. Neither works out 100% of the time though.


2. What's it like to go through birthing with your dog? How often do c-sections occur?
Its very nerve wracking. Even if everything goes right, you still worry.


3. Do you ever have puppies that get sick? What is that like? heartwrenching I'd imagine.
You cannot breed without eventually having puppies get sick and die. Its horrible.


4. What happens if you can't place all the puppies?
I've only had one puppy I couldn't place. Shanny. She stayed, obviously. Otherwise most of my puppies are sold before they're born or shortly afterwards. Any puppy not sold stays here until they are, no matter how long that might be.


5. Do you ever get criticized by rescue organizations for not helping with the pet overpopulation problem?
Only uninformed ones. I am not causing the pet overpopulation problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,694 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks so much for the info. I bet if peeps realized that pups can die, that some don't get placed, that its a ton of work they *might* might reconsider irresponsible breeding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,548 Posts
Apollopuppy said:
Thanks so much for the info. I bet if peeps realized that pups can die, that some don't get placed, that its a ton of work they *might* might reconsider irresponsible breeding.
Nah. They'd just dump them off at the shelter. Out of sight, out of mind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,623 Posts
Hi Laura (I know that reference to pointing "here" at the right palm.... I used to live in SE MI and would point "there"!)! Interestingly enough, we've had a RUN on eebb (ylws w/ choc pigment for the non-breeders) lab pups in the shelters and rescues here in Yakima recently. Oh, and chocolates too. They are all out of control dogs from what I hear.... It SO irritates me!!! I keep asking the rescues to please(!) ask the surrendering owners to give the names of the breeders. I just know they are coming from the same stock.... and to add further insult, I had a new vet in town tell me that she travelled to Seattle to get her Lab puppy BECAUSE of the horrible temperaments of labs here-- they had to muzzle many of them to examine them. Gosh that made me upset to think that she didn't bother to ask if there were any reputable breeders around (there are!). Unfortunately, I sell very few of my Labs locally as the locals would not pay that much for a pet.

So Appollopuppy, it's a much bigger issue than meets the eye. Somehow we have to educate folks on what to look for in a breeder and why costs are what they are... Also-- I find it interesting to hear that 80% of the pet population comes from BYBs, 10% from puppy millers and 10% from responsible breeders.

I sat down and wrote a letter to our editor the other night. I'm really hoping we can get them to do a piece on responsible breeding to let folks know where all the strays and surrenders are NOT coming from! -Anne
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,676 Posts
I'm not a breeder, but I can answer regarding the 3 litters we whelped here at the rescue.....

1. What type of work goes into determining what dogs to breed to each other? Like how do you pick which two dogs would produce the best pups if bred together.
This is NA for us.

2. What's it like to go through birthing with your dog? How often do c-sections occur?
My first whelp I was a wreck. I had a 9 year old heartworm positive *****. I was freaking out. She delivered just fine...but it was a long night from temp drop to first pup. And the pups were incredibly small. 6 oz. to 13 oz. I don't know about c-sections, because we've never had to do that. The other two deliveries were not as harrowing, but still just as stressful.

3. Do you ever have puppies that get sick? What is that like? heartwrenching I'd imagine.
I had 3 puppies die in my arms one night. It makes you physically ill.

4. What happens if you can't place all the puppies?
Rescues usually don't have a problem placing puppies, but we keep them until we find the right home.

5. Do you ever get criticized by rescue organizations for not helping with the pet overpopulation problem?
We don't criticize the responsible reputable breeders. They don't have enough litters in a year to meet the public demand let alone contribute to the over population problem. We criticize the back yard breeders, the commercial breeders and the puppymillers who have 3 + litters on the ground at any given time. They don't test their breeding stock and they don't care. That is where the problem is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
1. What type of work goes into determining what dogs to breed to each other? Like how do you pick which two dogs would produce the best pups if bred together.
First off before I will breed my female has to pass all clearances (hips,elbows,eyes,and heart). Then she must have a correct temperament but she would have that or I would not have kept her. I will have shown her and hopefully she has done well. I also like my dogs to have titles at the end of there name.
I will then honestly look at my dog and see wants need improved on. I will try to find a stud dog that will improve the those quality she might be lacking. He also most have a great temperament. I will look at his history on OFFA and make sure he comes from sound lines and that he is producing sound puppies. I want to be able to see pictures of his pups. So I know what he is producing in type. And then we pray that all works out.

2. What's it like to go through birthing with your dog? How often do c-sections occur?
It is a very stressful but exciting time. You do not get much sleep as my dogs tend to start labor at night. I have only had 6 litters and only one c-section. It is a very scary thing. You worry about your girl and her pups. And can only pray that all turns out okay.

3. Do you ever have puppies that get sick? What is that like? heartwrenching I'd imagine.
I have never had pups get sick after birth but I have lost some during and right after birth. It is very sad. I have probably been lucky so far, but we are very careful.

4. What happens if you can't place all the puppies?
We had not had this problem yet. My pups are usually spoken before before they are even born. I try to keep a least one and co-own one or two, then I donate some to a Service Dog organization and if I have any left I have a waiting list.

But like most reputable breeder my pups stay with me until they can find a home.

5. Do you ever get criticized by rescue organizations for not helping with the pet overpopulation problem?
I have not had a problem with this. But I am not part of the problem, I know where all of my pups are at all times. And if for any reason someone can not kept the dog they bought, per my contract they must return the dog to me. I am the only one that can re-home one of my dogs. I let them be brought into this world and I will be responsible for them forever. Luckily I have not had this problem yet but I am very picky on who get my pups.


Breeding is not for the faint of heart. Most people think that it would be fun to have a house full of puppies running around and they do not understand all the time and heartache and goes into it. The first week you are up most of the time checking and making sure everyone is ok. You worry over every little thing. Then at about 3 weeks you are cleaning the whelping box and play area it seems like every time you turn around. I swear sometimes they all wait until you get it all clean with fresh bedding and they all go potty again. Then you worry if you found the best homes and you worry until that first call from the new owners that they got home safe and sound. I still worry about them all to this day. But I am a lucky one because my families are all very good about keeping me up to date. But you still worry, on April 3 a girl from my last litter had torn her ACL playing in the snow and had surgery. She is going to miss the birthday party this weekend. They turned one yesterday. We also had bad news we were suppose to have pups next week, but we learned the other day that she is not pregnant. We put are heart and soul into planing each litter and is heart breaking to us and the families we have to tell that we have no pups. This is the first time we had a pregnancy not take. It is devastating. I think I feel the worst for the service dog organization the was counting on 3 pups from this litter. But we love the breed so you pick yourself up and try again.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top