Just Labradors banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

So I'm thinking about getting a brother or sister for Lucy, my 4 year old Lab. She is the love of my life, and I would like for her to have a companion. I had a long time boyfriend, and his Staffordshire Terrier was Lucy's best friend, but we broke up recently and now its time to get a permanent mate for Lucy. My quest for a mate will have to wait. :-\ To bad I can't pick out a life partner like I can a Lab! LOL ;)

So, I have been scouring the area of breeders that have upcoming litters (my breeder doesn't have a litter due until August) and also thinking about maybe doing a rescue!?!

What are your thoughts on a rescue vs. a puppy?! I do have the time to raise a puppy right now, and I just looove little puppies. But part of me would love to extend out my warm home and love, and turn some life around for a shelter/rescue dog.

It's a big decision either way, and one I don't take lightly. I am interested in hearing any perspectives here ...

Thanks! And here is a recent picture of Lucy.
 
G

·
Well when I was a kid we got a rescue that was supposed to be a lab mix. Well he ended up biting me in the neck. So I am getting a puppy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,129 Posts
Hello and welcome! Lucy is beautiful.

As with preventing forest fires, "only you" can decide whether a puppy or a rescue is right for you. Of course, everyone loves puppies because they are so funny and so cute, and you have the opportunity to create rules and consistency and positive associations from the very beginning. But you also need to ask yourself:

--Are you willing to deal with housetraining and getting up in the middle of the night?
--How do you feel about poop and pee all over the place?
--How about everything in your house chewed as though attacked by a psychotic beaver?
--Do you have the kind of (flexible) schedule that allows for coming home in the middle of the day to let out a puppy?

For all these reasons, and the added pleasure of saving a life, many people choose rescue. Of course you can never be sure what you're getting, but most rescue groups will work pretty closely with you to make sure that the dog you're getting is somebody you can handle. (They don't want returns!)

Good luck! Let us know what you decide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
I think if you have a chance to rescue you should. There are SO many perfectly good, pure bred dogs that sit in shelters just because there aren't enough foster homes to put them in. Many die due to lack of space. Our first rescue was two years old and a year later we added another lab who is only a year old. Your doing a shelter dog a service by giving it a home and somehow someway I believe they know it. Good luck on your decision and please keep us posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,802 Posts
deific said:
Well when I was a kid we got a rescue that was supposed to be a lab mix. Well he ended up biting me in the neck. So I am getting a puppy.
How insightful. ::)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
theoconbrio said:
--How about everything in your house chewed as though attacked by a psychotic beaver?
:laugh:
That is hilarious! Yes, I have seen that before! Lucy wasn't a heavy chewer when she was a pup, but she really took a liking to the base boards in the house. I should have invested in Bitter Apple stock...

I'm lucky in that I work from home 75% of the time right now, and can do 100% at home this summer. So it seems like the right time to get another dog. Either way, be it a puppy or a rescue, I will want to be around lots to ensure an easy transition for both Lucy and the new one.

Thanks for everyone's insights. I will keep you posted... and I'm sure have lots more questions when the time comes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,915 Posts
we adopted luke from rescue at age 3+. when we decided to add a 2nd lab, we adopted taylor, at age 8+ months. we've fosted adults, seniors, and puppies, and puppies are soooo hard, and so much more work. we really like adopting adult dogs, because the personalities are already developed, and it's easier to tell if the new and old dogs will get along. also, potty training is so much easier since adult dogs have bigger bladders with better control.

another thing to remember is that adopting a homeless dog save two lives - the life of the one you adopt and the life of another dog who gets saved due to the open spot in the shelter/rescue organization.

i'm not too biased, am i? ;)

puppies are great, too. i get puppy fever from time to time. ;D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,575 Posts
We've always bought from breeders, though I would like to rescue at some point.

That decision will have to be yours...

Just a point to mention, getting another puppy isn't something to go into lightly. It shouldn't be an instant gratification thing. If you want a puppy, and you like your past breeder, WAIT. Just because they don't have anything ready now isn't necessarily a bad thing. Most of the times if you want to get a pup from a decent breeder, you will rarely find one with pups ready to go home.

Good luck with whatever you decide. My personal vote is wait on your breeder and get another puppy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,676 Posts
deific said:
Well when I was a kid we got a rescue that was supposed to be a lab mix. Well he ended up biting me in the neck. So I am getting a puppy.
What did you do to provoke him?

Please don't confuse rescue with getting a dog from a shelter. Which neither are bad if you go ahead and really do your home work. Working with a rescue as opposed to a shelter you get the benefit of knowing more about the dog. They live in foster homes with people, kids and other dogs and they get trainined and treated just like they belong to the foster family.

You need to decide what you'd rather do. You can also get a puppy through rescue. I have 3 of them right now. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,586 Posts
What Sunjin (lukefromgeorgia) said!

We have done both. Angus was about five weeks when we got him, Simon about seven months. Both were shelter dogs.

I, too, really can't say enough about how wonderful it is to adopt a shelter dog. When you think of the thousands upon thousands who are put down every year. Healthy, sweet dogs, there through no fault of their own. It just tears my heart out. :'(

Now...

Angus was just a baby, too young. Horrible behavior problems because of being separated from his mom and litter so young. But, raising him did have the advantage of being able to shape him to some degree, and start training very early when that little brain was just like a sponge. ;) However, the chewing, the biting, the potty training, more chewing and biting. That first few months, really through the first year, was EXHAUSTING.

Simon was seven months. SO much easier than Angus. We knew what his personality would be, knew what size he would be, all that jazz. And I really think he seems more grateful than Angus, who has never known any different than living with us. :) Now, Simon did come with a little baggage, some fears and a lack of confidence, but nothing that couldn't be worked through. :) He has taken well to training too and, ironically, in many ways he is better behaved than Angus, who we raised from a pup. :-[ Which I guess speaks volumes about my skill as a dog trainer. :D

Anyway, as Nathan said, it's really up to you. But I do thank you for considering a rescue! If you have a home and love to give, why not give it to the dog who needs it most? :angel:
 
G

·
Puppy or rescue? I get this question all the time from friends of friends. First of all it is your question to answer based on the information you already hold and gather from those involved.

If a puppy is decided upon then I would strongly suggest a reputable breeder and forgo the ads in the newspaper selling puppies for half the price.

A rescue is a noble venture but not for everyone. You have to know that many require extra time and effort to train and/or socialize. Some can come ready to move right in and that requires a lot of screening and patience but can happen.

Those that contact me for a puppy have small children and/or want to be assured that their new family member has a certain extremely patient and friendly temperament and also they are going for a specific "look". They want a big muscular type Labrador. There is nothing wrong with wanting what you want either. I had one woman come to look at a litter that was 3 weeks old (a family backed out) and she instantly burst into tears???? Turns out she had been given a guilt trip by her well meaning neighbor before coming about going to a shelter instead. When she came in she immediately fell for our mama dog and loved the pups and set up, etc. She was crying tears of happiness but also a bit of guilt. I told her that she had no reason to be upset and this was a huge decision for her and her family's life. She is very happy with her dog from us and she also visits her local humane society once a week to walk and play with the dogs. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,955 Posts
deific said:
Well when I was a kid we got a rescue that was supposed to be a lab mix. Well he ended up biting me in the neck. So I am getting a puppy.
Our Lhasa Apso bit me on the face after we were both startled awake by a ringing telephone. Therefore, henceforth and forevermore, I declare all Lhasa Apsos psychotic. ::)

Rescue groups do everything they can to make sure dogs are properly matched with families - for the sake of the family, for the sake of the dog and for the sake of the rescue group. They prefer not to get the dog back when they could be using their resources to help others instead of re-adopting a dog that wasn't a good fit.

With a rescue, you will find out if the dog does well with other dogs, with cats, with children, how much training they have, how affectionate they are, how independent they are...

I still have the notes I took from the day I talked to Otis's foster mom on the phone for the first time. I filled PAGES.

Obviously, getting a puppy from a reputable breeder is a great way to go too. And I so want to do that some day too. But with Nathan's four bullet points, rescuing an adult dog has just been the way for us to go so far. The puppy may have to wait till we're retired.

Good luck!!
 
G

·
Dani said:
deific said:
Well when I was a kid we got a rescue that was supposed to be a lab mix. Well he ended up biting me in the neck. So I am getting a puppy.
What did you do to provoke him?

Please don't confuse rescue with getting a dog from a shelter. Which neither are bad if you go ahead and really do your home work. Working with a rescue as opposed to a shelter you get the benefit of knowing more about the dog. They live in foster homes with people, kids and other dogs and they get trainined and treated just like they belong to the foster family.

You need to decide what you'd rather do. You can also get a puppy through rescue. I have 3 of them right now. Good luck.
I didn't do anything to provoke him. Thank you. Unfortunately rescues aren't for everyone, and my experience scared me off from getting another one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you everyone..... all great points to think about. It will be a process to make this decision, that as I said before, I do not take lightly. This summer I can work from home full time, and that seems like it would be good timing for me to introduce a new dog to our lives. I also know that I have three trips planned in the next two months... so I'd have to do it AFTER Memorial Day weekend, so that I can be here for both the new pup and Lucy as she will have to adjust.

I spoke with Lucy's breeder. She is a reputable breeder who has been showing and breeding dogs for over 30 years. She's a bit gruff. My take is she is more of a dog person than a people person, which I am totally OK with. She thinks she will have a litter in August.

Another local breeder (who I found online), and has a litter due in early July. She says that she's been breeding for over 20 years, and knows Lucy's breeder very well. The sire has his Championship. The dam has not been shown. Both are beautiful dogs.

Both the breeders are members of the LRC of Greater Denver area...

On the flip side of this coin, I will call the local rescue organization, SafeHarbor.org to talk to them about my situation. Because I am renting, I am concerned that will be a strike against me. I will also call a couple of shelters to let them know what I am looking for. The Boulder Humane Society has information on its homepage that if you put in a request, they can alert you when your match comes in. The fee is higher to do it this way, but you have a better chance of finding what you are looking for...

Again, thanks. I really appreciate everyone's insight!
 
G

·
I agree w/ what Dani said. Personally, I would go through a rescue. There are perfectly good dogs out there in need of homes, but because they aren't cute and cuddly puppies they get over looked. That is my opinoin.

Check Petfinder or any of the local rescues.

Darren
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
786 Posts
Did anyone suggest adopting a puppy from a reputable rescue group? I didn't read the other responses but sometimes puppies will get dumped at the animal shelter when they can't sell fast enough for the byb. ANd there are really good dogs that come from oops litter.
 
G

·
Go for a rescue Labrador .. i gues some where in North America there's a brave and good Labrador waiting to be rescued by you! ;)

And if you want to see a Happy Labrador .. just rescue one! ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,118 Posts
Our second dog, Chamois, is a rescue but she was still only a 3 month old puppy when we adopted her. I really wanted to go the rescue route with the second dog and my preference was an adult (no housebreaking, greater need, etc.). My live-with BF really wanted a puppy from a breeder, but his biggest point was because of our cats, he thought we should get a puppy in any case. So a rescue puppy was the compromise we reached. They're not as common as rescue adults, but they are out there as Dani said.

Have you thought about fostering a dog while you see what happens with your breeder's expected litter? That way you could help out a dog in need and do an evaluation as to whether or not the fit is good. If it is, you can adopt your foster. if it isn't, you've helped a dog on the way to its forever home even if that's not with you. And it fills some of the time when you have a free schedule but before any breeder puppies will be available. Just a thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,765 Posts
It's completely up to you...there is no right or wrong answer.

I got a puppy, and I have never regretted it. I loved the puppy stage, sure it was stressful at times but it was still fun. The next dog, however, will probably be a rescue just because I won't have the time I did in college to properly raise a puppy.

That's why I say there is no right answer. It depends on what you want and your current situation.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top