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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone,

Alex is biting and playing too rough latetly and its getting a little out of control for comfort. To the point my 7 year old son will not come out of his room when alex is in the living room with us.

things we have tried so far

1. ignoring him and ending play time (has worked the best so far)

2. loud "ouch" or "yelp"

3. growling back at him.

4. gently holding his mouth closed

90% of the time he's a good boy but when we try to play with him he automatically gets too excited and starts biting at our hands,feet whatever he can get a hold too.

Any advice is highly appreciated

Thanks,

Danny
 

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Holding his mouth shut never worked for us. I would advise against growling back, I think it actually encourages the rough house play style but I am not an expert. The ouch or yelp only worked for us a few times. We found ignoring and ending the play time to work best for us too. Just stick to whatever you choose and be consistant. I would think sticking to just one is the best option. It will get better. It worked for us within a week or two. Sometimes there are a few episodes when he gets really excited but they cease as soon as we ignore.
 

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We also have a the same thing going on with our puppy, Muddy. He gets into the "zone" and just wants to rough house. Only thing that calms him down is the penalty box (crate). With all the bad weather we have been having, we can not get him out enough, and I think that adds to his frustration, in the house.
 

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My pup did the same thing. I still have marks on my arms. We just would walk away and turn around for 30-60 seconds. She would be confused and eventually stopped the biting. She will occasionally bite now but its much softer and she doesnt pull or try to tear skin. I stearn NO now stops her.
 

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You've gotten really good answers thus far. Bravo guys!

Some puppies need a little more persuasion - particularly puppies that were homed before 8 weeks. They did not get the chance to learn bite inhibition from their littermates and are often mouthier longer.

One tactic to use for a hard case mouthy puppy is to roll their upper lip over a tooth and press the lip into the tooth. Not hard enough to injure - but hard enough to make them react. They need to learn that this behavior hurts. The combo of withdrawing attention and teaching that they are inflicting harm when they mouth is pretty effective.
 

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We are not having this problem with our lab puppy, but when our Golden Retriever was a pup she would do the same thing. We taught her to "get a toy" and to this day, if she gets into that rough zone playing with the other dogs, we tell her to get a toy and she immediately grabs one and beats them up with that.

Good luck, all the advice has been excellent.
 

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How old is your pup? We would do the walk away technique and come back, repeat as necessary if still biting. She is now 5 months and its no longer an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thank you for the responses. Alex is 11 weeks old right now. We will continue with the walking away and ignore technic. Hopefully he will get it soon my hands and forearms cant take much more of it :). Thanks again for all the great advice.

Danny
 

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The only thing that worked with Gracie was to ignore her and stop the playing and if she kept biting at me it was time out in the bathroom. We didn't crate train her, so if you have a crate...just a few min in the crate usually works. Good luck
 

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Patience is the key. Jeb was a terrible biter. Nothing seemed to work. He eventually outgrew the behavior and is a wonderful dog. My arms were scarred also. People made jokes when they found out we were getting another Lab, especially since he is a full brother to Jeb.
 

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Moose is the same way.. he is 9 weets and the kids are bid reluctant to play with him. We are not crate training him, but I like the bathroom timeout idea.
 

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12-16 wks was worse for me - just be patient and consisten

For our mady, she would have temper tantrums when she doesn't get her way, like if we make her wait before going out, or if we are correcting her etc.. She would actually show some teeth and start growling too. She is 5 months now, and all of the biting, growling is 100% gone. i guess i just went through a puppy's version of terrible 2's? lol

Just wanted to share my experience incase you are in the middle of what i just went through, because during the time, i was thinking "what the heck did i just get into!?!?" lol
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the replies. I hope he grows out of it. I just got back from the vets office for his booster shots and Dr. Thomas instantly notice all the bite marks on my forearms and hands.:) He has gotten better with the kids which was my biggest concern but he's still play biting with me a little.
 

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I see the problem as simply not asserting yourself as the leader much like a dominant dog or mother dog would do early on. Yes puppies like to bite and chew but there has to be limits. A dominant or mother dog would make sure they knew their limits quick and fast..no questions asked. IMO- if and when the puppy starts biting at all, a smack on the butt or mouth and saying NO..forcefully...will make it clear RIGHT NOW that you do not bite..period. You can then put the puppy in a crate or tie him up and ignore him. It won't take long that a NO will be all it takes to re-enforce the notion biting is not permitted. Again IMO- you have to be far more assertive in order to protect your child.

This past christmas our family came to visit along with their small kids. Our then puppy was 6 months old and was told to lay down on his rug..the children approached the pup...the pup looked at us and we said..lay down..if he looked like he was getting up we said NO..he stayed right on his rug, the children even petted the pup and the pup never moved. He wasn't afraid but he knew NO meant No and want to obey us. This is the whole point, dogs are more likely to obey because they know who the leader is and their desire to please the leader takes over. When the people left, the pup was praised and loved. But when they get out of line and they know it, you have to make sure you can be the leader....
 

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I see the problem as simply not asserting yourself as the leader much like a dominant dog or mother dog would do early on. Yes puppies like to bite and chew but there has to be limits. A dominant or mother dog would make sure they knew their limits quick and fast..no questions asked. IMO- if and when the puppy starts biting at all, a smack on the butt or mouth and saying NO..forcefully...will make it clear RIGHT NOW that you do not bite..period. You can then put the puppy in a crate or tie him up and ignore him. It won't take long that a NO will be all it takes to re-enforce the notion biting is not permitted. Again IMO- you have to be far more assertive in order to protect your child.

This past christmas our family came to visit along with their small kids. Our then puppy was 6 months old and was told to lay down on his rug..the children approached the pup...the pup looked at us and we said..lay down..if he looked like he was getting up we said NO..he stayed right on his rug, the children even petted the pup and the pup never moved. He wasn't afraid but he knew NO meant No and want to obey us. This is the whole point, dogs are more likely to obey because they know who the leader is and their desire to please the leader takes over. When the people left, the pup was praised and loved. But when they get out of line and they know it, you have to make sure you can be the leader....
Not wishing to launch another great debate - but leadership does not equal corporal punishment and smacking a very little puppy = hand shyness in many, many cases. I have never laid a hand on my now 15 month old puppy and he is very clear on who the leader is.
 

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Not wishing to launch another great debate - but leadership does not equal corporal punishment and smacking a very little puppy = hand shyness in many, many cases. I have never laid a hand on my now 15 month old puppy and he is very clear on who the leader is.
I have to agree. I have never raised my hand to a dog. My daughter was 11 when we got Harvey, and i honestly think that while she loved him, her nose was a little out of joint as she was no longer the center of attention when he was a small pup. We, therefore, encouraged her involvement in training etc, Harvey had to learn that we were a tight unit and the alpha dog. Louise got involved in walking him, playing with him, toileting him, dishing out the treats and feeding him. An old saying "Never bite the hand that feeds you". We all take turns in feeding Harvey now, we have never had issues with biting. From the pictures you have posted i would say your 7yr old is the youngest, so maybe he is feeling a little put out with this new arrival. Engage him in the training and care of your pup, they will soon grow into great friends. Good luck!
 

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My wife and I were talking about that the other night. I think Edwin(my 7 year old) was a little jealous of our puppy the first few days but has come around. He loves giving him treats because he gets his hands licked.:)
 

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Thank you for the responses. Alex is 11 weeks old right now. We will continue with the walking away and ignore technic. Hopefully he will get it soon my hands and forearms cant take much more of it :). Thanks again for all the great advice.

Danny
11 weeks old! You are gettting great advice, excluding hitting the dog. You need to stay committed, and that may well mean correcting and ignoring the dog any time the dog takes any human skin into its mouth. At 11 weeks old, you have a pretty good period ahead of you that is going to require your consistent correction of the behaviour. It is not going to go away this week. As I remember it, it goes on with steady improvement until the adult teeth are in. Or maybe its when the adult teeth (much less sharp) are in and it doesn't hurt anymore.<g> Seriously, just discourage it when it happens, do nothing to promote it.
 

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We are having the same issue with our 11 week old female Gabbie. Our vet gave us a good idea, she said get a squirt bottle and whenever she starts to bite too hard say NO! and give her a squirt on the head or where ever. We did it and got instant results. When she gets squirted with that water she instantly stops and is like what the heck is that. We also use it when she starts "attacking" our 3 year old son and our 6 Year old son. We have tired the Yelp, turn your back and ignore (she just kept bitting the back of our legs), crate time out, rolling the lip so she bites her slef, distration, this was the only thing that has worked for us. Seriously it looks like we have a cat not a dog because our arms are so scratched up from her bitting. I have learned from this site that part of the problem is that we got her at 6 weeks old and she did not learn the propper bit inhibition from her siblings/mother but the squirt bottle is helping us out.
 
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