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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Cappy and Remi have helped me design and carry out an off-season project that started in early March. I was determined to make several two man (or 1 hunter and a dawg) low profile pit blinds for use around our 7-1/2 acre wetlands where we had lots of late season birds but they were very shy of our above ground blinds. I decided to use Rubbermaid 150 gallon stock tanks that are 25" deep X 39" wide X 59" long and are large enough to accomodate a hunter and dawg or two average sized hunters. These "pits" are buried just above the high water line so there's no need to anchor them as the ground water is below the bury. We will back fill around each and then plant with matching rye and other native grasses.

The general idea is to bury a pit right up to its ledge all the way around. The frame for the front panel that faces the water is 30" high by 55" long and is made of 3/4" PVC schd 40. it's hinged at the front bottom so that it can lean back towards the hunter or lay down flat in front of the blind



Here it is in the in the down-to-shoot position.



The 30" high front is designed to lean back towards the shooter at a 30degree angle where a stop holds it in place. There are two 10" X 18" camo netting viewing ports sewn into the upper area of the front panel. A 22" wide overhead roof is made of 1/2" PVC schd 40 and is attached by three machine bolts that are permanently mounted to the front top, and then the roof is quickly attached or removed by three oversized wingnuts. The detached roof stores inide the blind when not in use.

Both the front frame and roof are covered in 1000 denier Mossy Oak Shadow Grass fabric, as is the 5/8" thick plywood top that secures the entire top of the blind when it's not in use.



Here's 2 of the 3 blinds we've made so far with their roofs off and stored inside the blind and the full plywood cover in place with the front panel laid flat back over the blind cover. Everything is held securely in place using two 36" long truck tarp straps, secured to an eye hook in the front of the blind then stretched tight over the cover and front panel to the lip of the pit blind in back. It's weather tight and critter resistant.



Here's my two water monkeys (opps assistants) on the secured blinds just to demonstrate the strength of the tops.
 

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WOW Jim - what a project. Looks like your assistants are due lots of treats for such beautiful workmanship! You are always doing something interesting. What does the grandson think of these - bet they'd be fun for hide and seek!
 

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Absolutely brilliant! You are a clever man Jim!
 

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Wonderful Jim!!! I really need to come to Texas.
 

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Excellent idea! You remind me so much of my dad....always inventing something! Glad to see the dawgs aren't afraid to climb right into the tubs.

Just out of curiousity, when you bury the tubs in the ponds, is there any chance that they could fill up with water if the pond starts to flood?
 

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Those are great! I'm wondering though, trying to picture one of the dawgs down in there with you and it's time to retrieve. Do they hop out over the side to head out for their retrieve? I can't see them dashing across the front flap when it's in the down position but maybe it's strong enough to hold a leaping lab?
 

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What a project!! You & Carol sure make good use of your retirement time!! :)

(wondering the same as people asked above)....

btw, I love Remi's serious expression. She's ready to work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Paddysmom said:
Those are great! I'm wondering though, trying to picture one of the dawgs down in there with you and it's time to retrieve. Do they hop out over the side to head out for their retrieve? I can't see them dashing across the front flap when it's in the down position but maybe it's strong enough to hold a leaping lab?
Take a look at this picture again ...


When the front of the blind has been dropped down flat in front of us, the roof is then standing up (22" high). The dawg remains steady, seated at my left heel when I drop the front of the blind, and then I stand, shoot and hopefully the dawg is marking the fall of the duck while remaining steadily seated. Then, and only upon my verbal command (its name), the dawg is released for the retrieve. It is a 28" jump up out of the pit onto solid ground at the dawgs left and that's the way it will go to get to the water a few yards away. We will have trained from those blinds several times after they are installed to get both dawgs completely accustomed to them.

I didn't mention this in the original post but the blinds are also designed and intended to accomodate 2 hunters rather than just a hunter and dawg. In the instance where 2 people hunt from the blind but have a dawg, it is hidden in a camo covered dawg crate which is placed just to side and back of the handler. Since this picture was taken the side vents of the crate and the front door have also been covered with mesh netting which allows ventilation and good vision out, but birds cant see motion inside of it.


As far as getting full of water is concerned, the blinds are buried in a berm (the slope of the dike that retains the water in the wetlands) 5 yards from the actual shoreline and 30" above it. Therefore it cannot flood since the water will run out over a spillway before flooding over the top of the dike.

The camo covered plywood top covers prevent any rain water from entering other than when hunting and should that happen we simply hand bail small accumulations of water out. That will also occur with a wet dawg bringing birds back into the blind. That's just one of the three wonderful smells a duck hunter looks forward to: Hot black coffee, burnt gun powder and wet Lab hair! ;)
 
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