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I am starting to work more on Emilu's open stuff now (hopefully will get our CD in 2 weeks)and I am noticing a small problem with her retrieve on flat. When she runs in with the dumbell, she often "hits me" with it, then sits down into her front. Now, her fronts are NOT close to me - I've always had a problem with her sitting too far away from me and we work alot on getting her to sit closer ( I actually think it's an eyesight thing - I don't think she can see me well if she sits too close - we have trouble with wide heeling too) So I want to be really careful to not discourage her from coming in close, but I know that she can't be hitting me with the dumbell - anybody ever have this problem and what did you do about it? Just thought of something - should I tell her to sit as she gets in the right place to pre-empt her bumping me?
 

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Caleb has a tendency to look around on his way back and use me as a guide as to were he is. So, yes, we often get bumps. I just slightly bend my knees so he hits his chest on my knees. Has helped.
 

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I know of a guy locally who had a doberman that constantly raced in and rammed his head into the guys groin area, not a good thing, but he was stymied on how to stop it. A judge told him to get a cheap broom, take the head off it and put that between his legs so that just about an inch or two of the bristles were sticking out. The dog ran in and got a nose full of broom bristles and that was that. He never again had the problem. Just an idea you might try.
 

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That broom idea is ingenious. I've done the knee bend thing. It's a tough thing to fix because as you said she sits far away as it is. Another idea is to teach her to look up at your face as she comes in (try spitting food) then she will be sitting close and the DB won't bump you. Also, if she happens to bump you in a show, stand as still as a rock. Sometimes the judges aren't sure if the dog actually bumped you or not depending on their vantage point but a handler that moves is a dead give away. ;)

I'm sure I shared the story of showing in Open B for Murray's last ASCA CDX leg where clowning around was the word of the day. He used to grab the DB by the bell instead of the bar no matter how hard I tried to fix it. On the ROF he ran into me and actually wedged the **** thing between my legs. :eek: He couldn't sit without letting go so he just stood there holding it with a confused look on his face. ::) The judge finally stopped laughing and called "exercise finished". Then we went to the ROH and as Murray was coming back over the jump, he dropped the DB. No problem, he knows to pick it back up. Well he ran to it (fairly close to me), then laid down and started gnawing on the DB. :mad: Daggers were shooting out of my eyes so Murray calmly rolled over so now he had his back to me to avoid eye contact and continued gnawing. I wasn't sure what to do so I looked over at the judge and she said "you can still Q if you can reach the DB" so (I still can't believe I did this in front of everyone) I bent over and walked out to him on my hands, snatched the DB from him, restrained myself from whacking him on the skull with it, then walked back in on my hands and stood up. Of course Murray fronted perfectly then. ::) We Qd and got our CDX but geez...what a fiasco for our last leg and in front of all the B people too. I guess it makes it more memorable though. I can laugh about it now with the passage of time and lots of therapy. ;)
 

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The broom idea reminded me of the horse that we had that would hum and haw about getting in the trailer. Someone said just poke her with the bristle end of the broom. It worked, at least for her.
 
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