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Discussion Starter #1
I've just returned from a showing of "My Left Foot" at the public library. What an emotional experience -- I feel drained and uplifted.

It's the story of Christy Brown, Irish writer and painter, and based on the author's autobiography, "My Left Foot." Christy was born with a form of cerebral palsey such that the only limb he had good control of was his left foot. Doctors advised his parents he was hoplelessly mentally retarded but his mother didn't give up on him, and somewhat as Annie Sullivan did with Helen Keller, helped him achieve a breakthrough in which he learned the alphabet and then to read, write, and paint.

This film won Academy Awards for Daniel Day-Lewis (best actor) and for another cast mbr as best supporting actress (as his mother); it was also nominated for best picture, best director, and best adapted screenplay.

While many films may entertain me, many also often leave me having to overlook gross fictions or improbabilities in realistic psychological reactions.

Not this film -- it was absolutely "spot on" in portraying typical Irish family roles (see, for example, Irish families in McGoldrick's "Ethnicity & Family Therapy") as well Christy Brown's uneven maturation -- some immature personality reactions as well as flavored by a picking up of some of his father's less than stellar reactions.

The film presents the greater truth while changing certain sequences, condensing several important people into one person, for the sake of telling a coherent, believable story, not burdened by small, less important actualities.

The performance by Daniel Day-Lewis is one of the greatest, believable acting jobs I've ever seen. Truly magnificent, outstanding, superlative.

"My Left Foot" has more than some similarity to the much later film, "The Diving Bell & the Butterfly," in that each portrays the real life of a person surmounting the imprisonment and isolation of a severe physical handicap and achieving success.

And it resonates with William Enest Henley's "Invictus" which begins:

"Out of the night that covers me,
Black as the pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul."


 

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I'm going to have to go see this now Bob. I was hoping it was on my "watch instantly" via netflix, but unfortunately it is not. So I either have to wait to put it on my Que or run to the video rental place!!

Normally I don't watch movies, because it takes a lot for a movie to really impress me. I guess my standards are too high. :D
This sounds like I will enjoy it though. Have you seen The Magdelene Sisters? That movie was one of the few I loved! I own it. I really like movies along that line.
And anything WWII, particularily Nazi Germany Films. I have like three version of Anne Frank, I'm still waiting to see the German film of it, and I own The Final Days of Sophie Scholl, also a German film. I believe it has English if you want it, but I speak a little German, read/write it better than I speak/understand it. So all my German films I leave on German audio with English subtitles to help me out.

oops there I go rambling again!!
 

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I saw this for the first time about a year ago. The opening sequence during the credits still sticks with me. How Christy (and Daniel Day Lewis for that matter) could use his foot to get a record album out of a sleeve and put it on a turntable was amazing!
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
LuckyGirl -- I haven't seen "The Magdalene Sisters" yet -- I want to.

If you like movies involving Nazi Germany, you might consider "The Lives of Others" (english title of a German? film; #57 of imdb's all-time top 250 films) and "Black Book" (english title of a Dutch film; 8.0/10 stars on imdb). Both are excellent.

 

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Bob I saw My Left Foot when it came out in the theater. Day-Lewis did such a good job it took me half the film to recognize him.
 
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