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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

I was just wondering if you can tell me how to teach the "leave it" command. It's one I haven't taught before.

I have a vague idea of how to do it, but if people have used a particular method and had success with it, I'd love to know!

Thanks! ;D
 

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I know you've got a link but the way I taught it was I'd place something interesting on the ground, then I'd walk by it with apollo on a leash, when apollo seemed interested in the object I'd say "leave it" The sound and tone of my voice would usually be enough for him to look at me like "what?" and then when he looked away from it I would reward him with a click and a treat. Over time that progressed to just a click, now he doesn't get anything (except the love in my heart lol ;) )

Eventually he got the idea of what 'leave it' meant and now I can say 'leave it' and he'll do it.
 

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Honestly, I did what a friend suggested. I dropped something on the ground and when Maui went to grab it I stomped on the ground really hard near him and shouted "LEAVE IT!" He backed right up and sat down and looked at me.

It worked like a charm. Now all I have to say for anything is "leave it" and it's no problem. I only really had to use that loud voice with him two or maybe three times.
 

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The group trainer we used (Trish Pooley) told us to put a few kibbles in the dog's dish at meal time and say "leave it!" and prevent the dog from eating it. Then (at first VERY shortly after that) put in a few more and say "Take it!"

As soon as the dog gets the idea, this can be extended over slightly longer periods of time, and with more than one "Leave it!" and adding more kibble to the bowl. Give ample praise for leaving it.

As Trish explained it, it was a way of helping the dog grasp the idea that obeying "Leave it" didn't mean giving up something but rather it meant getting something more.

Trish had over a year of total training between the San Francisco animal shelter and a training school in Washington or Oregon. Good trainer.

Worked for us.
 

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I used a leash when mine was a puppy, for leave it. He'd come upon something, I'd give just a mild tug of the leash while saying leave it. Or in the house, if he'd want to pick up an object I didn't want him to have, I'd hold the object down on the floor so he couldn't pick it up, while saying leave it. Or if he already had something in his mouth, I'd pull it out, saying leave it. I dunno, but it worked for me.

Say he goes toward my shoe, and I figure he's gonna pick it up; I'll say leave it, and he turns away from it. I use leave it many times when he has a ball, and I say drop it. He'll drop it, but then want to pick it right back up, so I'll say drop it, and when he does I say leave it.

To me, leave it means just that...leave it alone. So the method Bob explained, while it may be a good method, seems confusing to me. Leave it, to me, means leave something alone, period. Leave it didn't mean something better was coming.

I've always used 'wait' at the food bowl. Put the food in, tell him to wait, then said OK and he'd eat.
 

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I had a thought regarding leaving the kibble in the bowl....i suppose it is more of a question.....what happens when he/she does not leave it and instead eats the kibble?
 

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Djc1249 said:
I used a leash when mine was a puppy, for leave it. He'd come upon something, I'd give just a mild tug of the leash while saying leave it. Or in the house, if he'd want to pick up an object I didn't want him to have, I'd hold the object down on the floor so he couldn't pick it up, while saying leave it. Or if he already had something in his mouth, I'd pull it out, saying leave it. I dunno, but it worked for me.

Say he goes toward my shoe, and I figure he's gonna pick it up; I'll say leave it, and he turns away from it. I use leave it many times when he has a ball, and I say drop it. He'll drop it, but then want to pick it right back up, so I'll say drop it, and when he does I say leave it.

To me, leave it means just that...leave it alone. So the method Bob explained, while it may be a good method, seems confusing to me. Leave it, to me, means leave something alone, period. Leave it didn't mean something better was coming.

I've always used 'wait' at the food bowl. Put the food in, tell him to wait, then said OK and he'd eat.
Same here... "leave it" and a leash correction. Simple is good.
 

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With the food thing, I put peanut in a down-stay while I put her food down, and then say "ok" to release her.

Will that be confusing to the puppy, do you think? or will it help his learning? Should I change the command and tell her to "leave it" instead..?

I don't want to confuse either of them.... and now I think I've confused myself!! I'm getting soo nervous for the "homecoming" I think my brain is shutting down! :p
 

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No don't change to "leave it"... that command is for something you don't want them to have at all, not something they will get in a second. I say "wait" as someone else said above while I am pouring their food, but down-stay is good practice too.
 

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So the method Bob explained, while it may be a good method, seems confusing to me. Leave it, to me, means leave something alone, period. Leave it didn't mean something better was coming.
All Labs are different and the method that works for one never works for all. But I can say, Puff has never had any problem going from the training at the bowl to outside when, e.g., she starts to roll in something -- "Leave it!" works for her there, too.

I had a thought regarding leaving the kibble in the bowl....i suppose it is more of a question.....what happens when he/she does not leave it and instead eats the kibble?
At first of course they don't want to "leave it!" You block them from eating it for just a bit until you tell them they can take it.
 

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Rionoir said:
No don't change to "leave it"... that command is for something you don't want them to have at all, not something they will get in a second. I say "wait" as someone else said above while I am pouring their food, but down-stay is good practice too.
"wait" to Peanut means sit by my side while we wait to cross the street.. (I did a lot of her training by myself, so many commands may be "wrong", but it's a system, and it works for us!)

I'm sure I'll figure something out..... I've just heard people talk about the command "leave it" and it sounds very useful... I'll definitely be working it into our repertoire!
 

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I think wait could be used for your food too, if that is how you are using it now... because i say the same thing when we come to the street, i say "wait" and they have to wait for me to tell them it's ok to go off the curb.

**in dog training classes they generally use wait as in "wait, do not go any further forward"... the dog is allowed to go side to side and backwards, but just cannot make any forward progression... like when a dog comes to the edge of your yard, or if you wanted them to stay inside when you went through a doorway, etc...

Rion
 

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There are probably commands people use, but use them for different things (sorry if getting off-topic here).

One of the first things I ever taught was 'wait'. But I live more in the country, where I don't walk my dog on streets and such (he's offleash in the yard all the time, and offleash in the nearby fields when we walk). I used wait to mean stop and wait, and in a moment we'll be going, or doing something else. Say he walks down to the car...I say wait, and open the door, then release him with OK, and he gets in the car. Or we arrive somewhere, I open the door, say wait...then with OK, he can jump out. Or we walk down to the bottom of the driveway (he stays in the yard offleash, so reaching the end of the driveway, he knows he can't leave the yard/driveway). I'll say wait...that means he's not allowed to leave the property 'til I'm with him. Once I'm by him, it's OK, and we leave the property to go to the field. Or hub's driving up the drivway, arriving home from work; Tucker's on the deck...I'll say wait, meaning he's to wait 'til hub stops the car; when he does, it's OK, and he can go down to greet him. So for me, wait means wait a moment or two, and then he'll be allowed another action..something else is coming. Or I put his food in his bowl, say wait, then OK, and he can eat. This probably sounds confusing, but it's what I do. So wait means different things at different times, but it means something else will follow the 'wait'.

Leave it has a different connotation....simply leave it alone.

So I use leave it for certain circumstances (leave that ball there, leave that shoe alone, etc.), and wait for other circumstances....he knows leave it means leave whatever alone, he knows wait means something else is coming, or going to happen, or he'll be released/allowed to do something in just a minute or so.

This is how I use those 2 words. You could probably use COWABUNGA! or another word for wait or leave it ;D; I guess it's all in how ya train 'em, and what words they get used to. ;D
 

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I taught Allie the leave it command in less than two days. It works on everything from taking Kleenex, toys and chasing the cat! :angel:

I clapped my hands, told her leave it and praised her immediately. If she was nearby or came to me, I gave her something else (I read once that we should never take something from a Lab without giving something back).

If she started to go near the undesirable object, :mad: I used her name and started to tell her how smart and wonderful she was before she got near it. That immediately got her attention. I would then give the leave it command and again tell her how wonderful she was. :laugh:

When she got to me, she got more love and attention.

She isn't chasing the cat anymore. And, when she is fighting every instinct in her and wiggling like crazy because that butt wants to take flight and chase, I tell her again that she is so smart and wonderful and a good girl. She comes straight to me and forgets about the dirt-bag...I mean the nice kitty, ::)

I know all of this sounds utterly ridiculous and I thought the same thing when I read it. Praising a dog *before* they did the naughty thing...but, it works...at least it is so far for my naughty little lab :D
 
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