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Ok so Alfie was playing with a yellow tennis ball at my mums until it decided to hide under the coffee table. We all thought it was hilarious watching him trying to get it out, my mum offered him another one...a PINK one

He quickly turned his nose up at that though!:mad:

Alfie: No my doggie fwens boyz cant plays wif pink balls its just not right!:D
 

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kaznalf,

I have read you posts for a long time. I hope you are kidding. Dogs are color blind. But that doesn't mean that they don't have different shades of gray that they prefer.

In the story your told, I suspect if the only thing diffferent between the two balls, same size, same surface, same squishiness, that the ball under the coffee table had a different scent.
 

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Ed, I'm pretty sure the OP was written with tongue firmly in cheek & even if it wasn't, it still made a good story. :D

I'd be pretty worried if my male Pug took a fancy to pink toys. :eek:
 

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Garth, I am sure you are right. I only stuck my two cents in because newbies hit this board and may not know.
 

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LOL sorry yes i know they are truly colour blind the way he looked at that pink ball though made me rethink for a few moments..he was disgusted we even suggested it
 

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Dogs are color blind. But that doesn't mean that they don't have different shades of gray that they prefer.
Ed, I thought the same thing - dogs being color-blind that is, but here is information that contradicts that to a certain extent.

Dogs do have some color vision but not as much as humans. Dogs have a particular form of colorblindness called deuteranopia. They can see gray, violet blue, and colors in the yellow-green genre. This is because humans have three different kinds of cones, the cells in the eye which detect color and dogs have only two of them. A dog's color vision is similar to that of a person who is red-green colorblind. It is difficult to detect the difference between red and green, but not between blue and yellow. This is why agility obstacles are typically painted blue and yellow.
Dogs are primed to see "motion." Rather than defining the world through sight alone. They use a blend of senses such as smell and hearing with their vision to do what we humans use our eyes alone to do.

The notion that dogs do not have color vision was rooted in some lazy early optical research studies done back in the early twentieth century, well before the actual function of a rod and cone in the retina was fully understood.

Thanks to that faulty understanding, because a dog's retina did not look identical to a human's who could see full color the researchers were too too quick to assume that dogs simply do not see color at all.

It's only recently that the question was revisited, and upon doing so the early errors and incorrect assumptions were found and corrected. And it is a scientific fact that dogs are not color blind.


http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Are_dogs_colorblind
 
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