Just Labradors banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My good friend has rescued a couple of horses. Having a love of horses my entire life it was heaven to be able to go visit this past weekend. I'm not sure how many people can honestly say that they went on vacation and raked up horse crap all over the pasture for 5 hours! LOL I know I can.

Captain is a very wise old elder with an estimated age of 37-40. His long winter coat made him a feel like a teddy bear when hugging him. The other horse, Sage is about 7. He was not in a good place for the first years of his life and now he suffers from moon blindness thanks to the neglect he suffered prior to coming to my friends house.

Now they are both content, well fed and happy in their new environment. During my hours in the pasture, I was able to help Sage remember how he was a trail horse before he went blind. We were able to get his blanket and saddle on him for the first time since loosing his sight and the pride in his body language told me that he was itching for a run. Though that is not an option right now due to the frozen tundra in northern wisconsin, it is my intention to help him in any way I can.

That is what brings me here. I am looking for any resources that you might have on moon blindness and sensory ideas or games that a blind horse can appreciate. I plan on making frequent trips to her neck of the woods (about 3 1/2) hours away and it would be great if I could have some games on hand for their mental and spiritual enrichment the next time I go.

Thanks for your help!
The horses thank you.

Sara
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,258 Posts
Moon blindness does not mean the horse is blind. Have you had an equine opthalmologist check his eyes?

The old mare at our barn suffers from moon blindness (periodic recurrent uveitis). This is very treatable. When she has episodes we dilate her eyes to relieve the pain and use steroid and antibiotic drops. We also pretty much keep her on an aspirin regime to control inflammation in her eyes. I've been treating this mare for almost 10 years now, and I know immediately when an episode is coming on and can begin treatment ASAP so she gets relief fast. She is not blind and at this age she won't be blind (she's probably not going to be around for many more years due to her age).

Get with your vet and find out how to treat this managable disease to give the horse some relief when episodes occur.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Raian. Sage has had a complete workup by the eye doc. He has very limited vision on the right and basically nothing on the left.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top