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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We Have a 7 month old lab pup who is a sweetheart most of the time. He learns fast and is good about wanting to please us. Except for between the hours of 5pm and 10 pm he is just about uncontrollable. He will not listen to commands to sit or lie down, he barks excessively, he jumps up on anyone who is near him, he counter surfs, he will steal the tv remote, cigarettes, or just about any thing else he can reach. This all starts right around 4 or 5pm when my wife gets home from work and continues till about 10pm. He goes off like a switch has been flipped inside his head, and when 10pm comes around the switch is flipped back off again and he is back to his sweet self again. Does anyone have any suggestions of what is going on and what we can do to correct this behavior. He has not been nuetured yet, but he hasn't started marking his territory yet either. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Mike
 

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This sounds to me like a problem that could be easily solved by more daily vigorous exercise. Especially around 5 PM. I think he's bored.

Have you taught him to retrieve? Taking him out around 5 PM for about 35 minutes of fetching (rule of thumb: 5 minutes vigorous daily exercise for each month of age up to 12 months).

When Bess was alive, I'd come home from the hospital around 6 PM and want to relax with a glass of wine. Bess had other ideas; she kept picking up everything she could grab in her mouth and drop them all at my feet -- until we went out for 40-60 minutes of swimming retrieves. Then she was very civil the rest of the day. Since Bess never put anything back, she trained me pretty fast.

When I got Puff, the training Bess gave me was still fresh; I knew what to expect with a Lab. We go out at 6:30 every morning for a 50-60 minute walk in a nearby nature preserve where she gets lots of off-leash fetches.

I suggest you try the fetching and if your Lab doesn't know how, teach him -- you'll find it an invaluable way of giving enough exercise to him without wearing you out. Swimming retrieves, if you have good available water closeby, is even better for Lab exercise -- it's hydrotherapy.

"A Tired Lab is a Good Lab" -- Socrates

"A Bored Lab that is not Tired is a Royal P.I.T.A" -- Confucius

"A Dozing Lab Rarely Causes Problems" -- Bhagavad Gita

"A Lab sufficiently exercised has partaken of Nature's own Prozac and Valium" -- Hippocrates


 

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what type of exercise is he getting? How long, and when during the day?

I fully agree with the above, it sounds as though he needs an outlet for his energy around 5pm, play fetch or take him for a good walk.

Not sure if you both work, but that is the big thing with having a dog when the humans all work all day. It means you come home to a dog that has rested for 8hrs and needs some exercise ASAP!
 

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Dogs are most active in the morning and the evening. I suspect you miss the morning show if you are at work and he is crated. He just sounds to me like a very normal adolescent Lab who will benefit from a more strenuous exercise regimen as has been suggested in the prior responses.

The stuff he is doing is pretty much all attention seeking behaviour.
 

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Hmmmmm!

Please read Bob's post. That dog needs some real exercise. Sounds like you are in the need for a supply of tennis balls and a Chuck-It.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone for your replys. We'll start a more vigorous exercise program today. I'll let you know how it's working.. again Thank You

Mike
 

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This is why I walk my labs for an hour off lead in the pm. Usually around 4.30 to 5. We get back they are exhausted, have a rest for an hour, eat dinner then lie around watching TV with the family. If they miss that walk we have all sorts of silly behaviour.
 

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This is why I walk my labs for an hour off lead in the pm. Usually around 4.30 to 5. We get back they are exhausted, have a rest for an hour, eat dinner then lie around watching TV with the family. If they miss that walk we have all sorts of silly behaviour.

haha i love this. It describes an adolescent lab perfectly. I just got back from a 1 hour walk with Milly this afternoon and have the contented snoozing lab that I adore. Without that walk she drives me nuts.
 

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I have recently had a lab dumped at my place so I am not the expert the people on this forum are,but I see one thing people aren't mentioning so I will throw my ignorance out there for people to comment on. I see that your dog starts acting up when your wife comes home and continues on to approximately 10 when I am assuming you are going to sleep.Is your lab wanting your wife's attention? Acting out like a child?
 

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I have recently had a lab dumped at my place so I am not the expert the people on this forum are,but I see one thing people aren't mentioning so I will throw my ignorance out there for people to comment on. I see that your dog starts acting up when your wife comes home and continues on to approximately 10 when I am assuming you are going to sleep.Is your lab wanting your wife's attention? Acting out like a child?
Given that you are commenting on a 16 month old thread, I would guess that their problem is resolved and that their Lab is doubtless more mature.

Applying psychology to canine behavior is a dicey business. Usually more exercise is the answer to behavior issues like this.
 

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revisit

Given that you are commenting on a 16 month old thread, I would guess that their problem is resolved and that their Lab is doubtless more mature.

Applying psychology to canine behavior is a dicey business. Usually more exercise is the answer to behavior issues like this.
You are right this is an older thread but sometimes its a good thing to revisit the more interesting ones. our 4 legged friends do require lots of exercise and I'm sure it has helped. As far as Psychology for dogs there are many books on the issue:happy: to each his/her own.
 
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