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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Kelly,

The term "dudley" is no longer used in relation to the pigment coloration on a Labrador Retriever. The term caused too much confusion, as illustrated by your questions. The term "dudley" was originally used to describe a particular red color pigment in the English Bull Dogs descended from a dog whose call name was Dudley.

Today we refer to the yellow Labrador Retriever as having black pigment, liver pigment (ranges from dark brown to pale brown) or NBP (no black pigment)-lacking pigment.

Black pigmented (nose, eye rims and lips) yellow Labrador Retrievers do not experience fade out of the nose pigment in winter. The black may become less brilliant but that is all.

Liver pigmented yellows have nose pigment color which can range from almost black to pale liver and on the dog with almost black pigment, only the nose pigment fades in winter, returns in warm weather and each year the fade comes back a slightly paler shade than the year before. The very dark brown, almost black eye and lip pigment is not affected by fading. The paler liver pigment does not fade but remains the same shade of light brown or tan year round. Both the eye rims and lips are the same pale pigment year round. The palest shade of liver pigment can be mistaken by some as being a lack of pigment. But, once you have seen a truly non-pigmented yellow Labrador Retriever, you realize there is a difference. The paler the liver pigment the more care should be taken to breed the yellow possessing the color to a dog whose lineage produces yellows with black pigment.

The NBP or non-pigmented Labrador has the same pink pigment as a new born yellow puppy. The eye rims, lips as well as the nose, paw pads are "puppy pink" in color and remain that way throughout the dog's life. Often the toenails are colorless. These dogs also tend to have pale eye color, yellow toned or blue/green. This color generally is inherited from a breeding of a liver pigmented yellow to a chocolate which carried yellow as a recessive trait. It is this dog without pigment which would be disqualified from competition and should not be used for breeding purposes.

NBP or non-pigmented yellows are NOT albinos. Albinism is extremely rare in the Labrador Retriever, so rare that we have no photographs or know of any examples, though we are not saying it has never happened. True albinism usually produces a white coat, and ice blue or red eye color.

We hope this explanation answers your questions. If you have further questions, please write. We are always happy to help people understand the nuances of the Labrador Retriever.

Thank you for writing to the Labrador Retriever Club, Inc.

Kelly and Amber
 
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Whoever wrote this is wrong.

The NBP or non-pigmented Labrador has the same pink pigment as a new born yellow puppy. The eye rims, lips as well as the nose, paw pads are "puppy pink" in color and remain that way throughout the dog's life. Often the toenails are colorless. These dogs also tend to have pale eye color, yellow toned or blue/green. This color generally is inherited from a breeding of a liver pigmented yellow to a chocolate which carried yellow as a recessive trait. It is this dog without pigment which would be disqualified from competition and should not be used for breeding purposes.
This is not a dog that lacks pigment. This dog is eebb just like a darker yellow with liver pigment like the dog I posted who in fact had pink lips and eyerims and green eyes as a puppy.

A lemon and white Beagle has very light "puppy pink" nose and lips as does a lemon and white Pointer - they do not "lack" pigment - it's simply a light liver.
 
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Also if you look closely at the very light colored yellows in the other post you can still see some brown around the pink noses. So I have NEVER seen a dog with "puppy pink" noses and lips and eyerims as an adult.
 

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WigWag said:
Also if you look closely at the very light colored yellows in the other post you can still see some brown around the pink noses. So I have NEVER seen a dog with "puppy pink" noses and lips and eyerims as an adult.
I was picking up on that part, too. Mick would have been considered a dudely. But, his nose, lips and eye rims did not stay "puppy pink". The best word to describe the color would have been terre cotta.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sorry but that is what the Labrador Retriever Club of America (They are the parent club of labs for the AKC)just sent me. I asked them for their current official standing on Dudley noses. Since the Parent club is the one that tells the AKC what the breed standards are, I am thinking they should be more knowledgeable than me. If you would like to argue with them. You can write them at [email protected]
Now this isn't to say they might not have made a mistake but it looked like a form answer to me and to a question they get asked alot.

Kelly and Amber
 

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So are they saying any lab who gets a snow nose is liver pigmented ??? Is that the same level fault as what we would typically (incorrectly I guess) call a Dudley?
 
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Sorry but that is what the Labrador Retriever Club of America (They are the parent club of labs for the AKC)just sent me. I asked them for their current official standing on Dudley noses. Since the Parent club is the one that tells the AKC what the breed standards are, I am thinking they should be more knowledgeable than me.
I do know that and they forward me many emails on silver Labradors to answer genetic questions for people. I will email them at some point when I have more time. It is an issue that I have been wanting to address for a long time however trying to get the wording changed in the standard is something that I do not want to tackle given what happened the last time.
 

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WigWag said:
I do know that and they forward me many emails on silver Labradors to answer genetic questions for people. I will email them at some point when I have more time. It is an issue that I have been wanting to address for a long time however trying to get the wording changed in the standard is something that I do not want to tackle given what happened the last time.
Yes lets not bring up how tall labs should be please.

Kelly and Amber
 
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