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I started working with Remington for obedience. My goal is to get his CD sometime around his 5 year birthday. Lofty goal, heh, LOL! Seriously, he needs time to grow some focus, and I don't know if he'll ever get there.

But... today we did doodle patterns, recalls, sits and downs, and he really had a good time! We are learning that heel is a position not an action (I set him up by leaving him and going off across the field and calling "heel" to him and making him find heel position again.. from all different angles).

Must say he did great today. The only problem area came with the down stay when I stood over him, he does NOT like that, but too bad.... he'll have to just work harder to not move ;)
 

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I started working with Remington for obedience. My goal is to get his CD sometime around his 5 year birthday. Lofty goal, heh, LOL! Seriously, he needs time to grow some focus, and I don't know if he'll ever get there...
Oh, you just made me feel so much better! Caleb is 3 1/2 and the closest we've come to trials is the sanctioned match we're entered in at the end of the month.

...We are learning that heel is a position not an action (I set him up by leaving him and going off across the field and calling "heel" to him and making him find heel position again.. from all different angles)...
Oh, what a great idea!


...Must say he did great today. The only problem area came with the down stay when I stood over him, he does NOT like that, but too bad.... he'll have to just work harder to not move ;)
So I'm not the only one who steps over their dogs when they're in a down? I started teaching it because my first Lab used to bounce up to get out of the way as soon as you had one foot over him.
 

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Yep, I step over mine :) One reason why is... I've been in lineups that were really really close, and I noticed that a lot of dogs didn't like it when people returned to their dogs, I saw more than one dog get up when someone approached on their off side. So I figured I better make sure mine stayed put no matter where people's feet were ;)

When teaching the "heel is a position" I keep walking, and I'll just leave Remington (as I walk I wave my hand in front of him and tell him "wait" -- almost like a moving stand for exam) and I continue walking away and call him to "heel" randomly. The dogs really enjoy this game and it really helps solidify where heel is for them.

BTW, Remington does have his RN and RA, but we stopped after that. The legs he got for his RA were simply deplorable. Had I been judge, I never would have Q'd him. We will eventually get back in the Rally ring too... but we need a lot more focus and heel work.
 

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Hmmm. Interesting that you are talking about the long sits and downs. So what if the dog in the long down next to you (to your right) was handled by a person in a power wheelchair? How would your dog react to that and how would you feel about it? Those chairs are not the same as manual chairs and are too expensive to have one on hand for the purpose of proofing.
 

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...When teaching the "heel is a position" I keep walking, and I'll just leave Remington (as I walk I wave my hand in front of him and tell him "wait" -- almost like a moving stand for exam) and I continue walking away and call him to "heel" randomly. The dogs really enjoy this game and it really helps solidify where heel is for them...
We've done something similar, but on lead. We called it "sit and walk"- just what it says- while heelling, sit the dog, walk to the end of the leash,then start walking as you call the dog to heel. I guess you'd call it the beginning steps of what you do.
 

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Ann, I have never encountered a wheelchair in formal obedience. Not to say that it wouldn't happen, but it's not something I train for as the odds are pretty much against that happening.

I have encountered a power wheel chair in Rally. A few years back a gal in our area showed her dog in Rally (she was in the chair) but she has not gone into the obedience ring.

If I were in a position where the chair was there... I'd just roll with it, and if my dog failed, well we would try again at the next trial. Can't fault the person in the chair, and like I said, it's not something I'd train for anyway (unless I KNEW there was someone in our club in a chair...)

My thoughts on that would be that the judge would have to make some kind of call for positioning the girl with the chair, to make it fair for the other competitors and her as well. Not sure what the rule book says.

Have you had that situation happen?
 

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good boy Remington..Robbie is 4 and still needs one leg for his CD..of course we only do 1 or 2 obedience shows a year..LOL
 

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I actually had a person next to us in a wheelchair in groups in Novice A Obedience. Realizing the numbers and where we were going to wind up I introduced Amber to the Person in the WC before groups. Amber was quite scared by the rolling person that followed/chased her into the ring just a few feet behind her, but I gave her a subtle correction and we lined up fine. The judge had us line up about 3-4 feet from the babby gates so the person would ahve enough room to go behind her dog, and we left enough room for her to squeeze between dogs when she returned.
 

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great job remington!!!

ever since i started classes at Top Dog i think they over proof. Last week i had apple on a sit stay and stood 12 feet out while one of the helpers were calling her name bouncing a tennis ball. Poor dogs...
Oh heck, Deanna, I've proofed "harder" than that for years- long before they started doing it at Top Dog. :) You never know what you're going to encounter at a trial, or in life. Heck- a few years we were watching a trial in Flemington. It was one of those really hot, humid days. My son decided to sit quietly in the shade ringside. Someone sitting ringside asked him to move because it wouldn't be fair if the dog in the ring jumped out of the ring because my son was eating a hotdog. The thought had never crossed my mind because we trained with stuff like that as a distraction. I just assumed everyone did.
 

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Oh heck, Deanna, I've proofed "harder" than that for years- long before they started doing it at Top Dog. :) You never know what you're going to encounter at a trial, or in life. Heck- a few years we were watching a trial in Flemington. It was one of those really hot, humid days. My son decided to sit quietly in the shade ringside. Someone sitting ringside asked him to move because it wouldn't be fair if the dog in the ring jumped out of the ring because my son was eating a hotdog. The thought had never crossed my mind because we trained with stuff like that as a distraction. I just assumed everyone did.
They told your son to move?? i would have had a nice polite answer to that one.

You know i never thought proofing was a big deal before i came to this school. We did proof but not to this extent, but then again ive never trialed yet. I thought this type of proofing was kinda being hard to the dogs, by calling their name to come??? but i guess its not. Last week Linda had us all play a game competing agaist eachother, she had a big bowl full of food the dogs had to sit touching the bowl with the body but not even thinking of eating it. Then she had us lay down as close as they possibly can get :eek: but i guess the more experienced handlers would think nothing of it :rolleyes: I'll get there one day :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I do proof my stays really well. I do the same thing. Once I know the dog understands the exercise I will make EVERY effort to make the dog move... so I can correct the dog. A bit sadistic, but it really makes for a reliable stay.

Remington is doing pretty well so far. I line him up with Ruger and Magnum and have left them all there for about four minutes while I run, toss balls, step over him, etc.

I also like to have someone else sit and call my dog, wave food at them, whatever, when I'm heeling so I can get good corrections in.

Our trouble area is of course heeling off leash, his mind wanders. And also the recall, he often comes galloping at me when I haven't even called him, but we are working on fixing it.

In two years, he might be ready to give novice a try ;)
 

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That's cool. I have not had that situation. A friend of mine is handicapped and she competes with her dog in Rally and agility and would like to try for a CD. She is worried that it would be unfair to the other competitors. She is hoping the judge would allow a few extra feet, not so much for her benefit but for the other dog. She feels that it would be very scary for a dog, in a down, to see a power chair coming at them when they aren't used to it. She called the AKC but they said the don't have to make the spacing wider, but she is going to go to some trials and talk to some judges to get a feel for it. She wants to get a CD on her dog, but she also doesn't want to ruin it for another competitor.

We are going to try it with our two dogs. If Miles jumps up, we can be pretty sure just about any dog will. Hey, it will be good proofing for us too.
 
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