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And try again to teach Alfie how to walk decently on a flat collar and lead and stop relying on haltis, harnesses, choke collars and rope leads!

Ive noticed in the past couple of months he has grown up ALOT, he listens more, ignores distractions more and does as he is told alot better. I think adolescence is over!

So ive bought him a new collar and lead and Im going to work at this everyday as when the baby is born and we are out with the pram I dont want to be dragged down the street.

So wish us luck! :D
 

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joflake said:
Good luck to you! I need to do the same with Willy.
Well it didnt go bad, as Im short and he has long legs his stride tends to be bigger than mine and even though he isnt pulling he is still in front and im constantly putting him back, as soon as I stop without saying anything he returns to my side but he is looking to be concerntrating more :D
 

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What a great goal to have for yourslef & Alfie!! Something I should take the time again to do with Bailey.

Good luck!
 

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kaznalf said:
joflake said:
Good luck to you! I need to do the same with Willy.
Well it didn't go bad, as I'm short and he has long legs his stride tends to be bigger than mine and even though he isn't pulling he is still in front and im constantly putting him back, as soon as I stop without saying anything he returns to my side but he is looking to be concerntrating more :D
Willy's worst problem is the dogs at the end of my driveway. They have two Sharpeis, not very friendly. Their yard is fenced in, but those two bark and snarl and throw themselves against the fence trying to get out everytime somebody walks past. Willy just can't contain him self and ignore them. He starts pulling trying to get over to them. We're fine once we get past them. Libby learned not to pay attention to them, but she's a different temperament than him. He thinks he's top dog and wants to show them a thing or two! :D
 

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joflake said:
kaznalf said:
joflake said:
Good luck to you! I need to do the same with Willy.
Well it didn't go bad, as I'm short and he has long legs his stride tends to be bigger than mine and even though he isn't pulling he is still in front and im constantly putting him back, as soon as I stop without saying anything he returns to my side but he is looking to be concerntrating more :D
Willy's worst problem is the dogs at the end of my driveway. They have two Sharpeis, not very friendly. Their yard is fenced in, but those two bark and snarl and throw themselves against the fence trying to get out everytime somebody walks past. Willy just can't contain him self and ignore them. He starts pulling trying to get over to them. We're fine once we get past them. Libby learned not to pay attention to them, but she's a different temperament than him. He thinks he's top dog and wants to show them a thing or two! :D
Oh we have that theres a collie cross down the alleyway that jumps up a 6ft fence and all you can see is this bouncing dog, I fear if he ever gets over as ive been told he attacked the postman once :no:
 

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Good luck! I spent a lot of time practicing this with Bauer (3x a day for 10 or 15 minutes at a time when we started). He does really good now, and changes his pace to match mine, etc. I practiced with him in the house first, then in the driveway and yard, then in the high school parking lot, then in the grassy areas around the high school, and finally on the street. This helped to slowly build in the excitement in the area and the distractions. I spent a lot of time at the high school just randomly walking, making lots of turns and changing directions constantly (I know I looked like a crazy person wandering around :crazy:). It took some time, but it did work.

I did do one thing really wrong . . . when I cross a street, I always run. He expects this now - crossing the street means run. The other day my husband was walking him, and was crossing a street. They stopped, and when they started to cross the street . . . Bauer took off running. Hubby was not expecting it! When he got home, he said, "Who taught this dog to cross streets?" :whistle:
 

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Bauer said:
Good luck! I spent a lot of time practicing this with Bauer (3x a day for 10 or 15 minutes at a time when I spent a lot of time at the high school just randomly walking, making lots of turns and changing directions constantly (I know I looked like a crazy person wandering around :crazy:). It took some time, but it did work.

I did do one thing really wrong . . . when I cross a street, I always run. He expects this now - crossing the street means run. The other day my husband was walking him, and was crossing a street. They stopped, and when they started to cross the street . . . Bauer took off running. Hubby was not expecting it! When he got home, he said, "Who taught this dog to cross streets?" :whistle:
I did the same thing when training Bella to walk nicely, changing directions all the time. I always wondered if anyone was watching me and what the h*ll they thought I was doing.

I've always made Bella stop and sit whenever we are about to cross the street. She has to stay for several seconds then I say "let's go" and we cross. She won't sit on her own but she'll stop.

It's hard to remember those frustrating days when Bella was young and wanted to pull and sniff all the time. Definitely not a pleasure going for a walk. But she came around, just takes a lot of practice. Of course now that she's close to 13 she's a lot calmer!
 
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