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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay....

12 inches in a foot
5280 feet in a mile.

I have an area of 25 miles that has raised 5 inches with liquid.

What is the volume of the liquid (the increased amount)?

My brain is on off at the moment. Either someone turn my head on or help me with the answer.

I don't even know if I am asking this right. I want to know the cubic ft volume. I could have been a scientist if I didn't suck so bad at word problems.
 

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Well, if it is an area, it should be 25 mi^2 (25 square miles). If that is the case..the area is 132,000 sq ft. V = length x width x height (5 inches of liquid).

Volume = 132000 sq ft x 5in/12 (for conversion) = 55000 cubic ft

I think that is right?! :)

Anyone? ;)
 

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liveelayne said:
Well, if it is an area, it should be 25 mi^2 (25 square miles). If that is the case..the area is 132,000 sq ft. V = length x width x height (5 inches of liquid).

Volume = 132000 sq ft x 5in/12 (for conversion) = 55000 cubic ft

I think that is right?! :)

Anyone? ;)

Ummm if area is 25 sq. miles then the sq. ft conversion is not right....it should be 6.97 X 10^8 Sq. Feet. The rest of the stuff is right though :)
 

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the sq. ft conversion is not right....it should be 6.97 X 10^8 Sq. Feet
Oh yeah, forgot to square it! Haha! :) Obviously it's too early to be doing math! :p

So with that correction, V = 2.9 x 10^8 cubic feet :)
 

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Shanna, why are you doing math so early in the morn? My brain doesn't work in the early morning. Then again when it comes to math my brain doesn't work at all.
 

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liveelayne said:
the sq. ft conversion is not right....it should be 6.97 X 10^8 Sq. Feet
Oh yeah, forgot to square it! Haha! :) Obviously it's too early to be doing math! :p

So with that correction, V = 2.9 x 10^8 cubic feet :)

It was wicked early for math when you posted the answer :p!

Only reason I used to do math that early in the morning was because I didn't get my hw done the night before and would try and rush it before the bus came and while I was on the bus. As my luck would have it math was almost always my first class of the day :-X
 

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Shanna said:
Okay....
12 inches in a foot
5280 feet in a mile.
I have an area of 25 miles that has raised 5 inches with liquid.
What is the volume of the liquid (the increased amount)?
My brain is on off at the moment. Either someone turn my head on or help me with the answer.
I don't even know if I am asking this right. I want to know the cubic ft volume. I could have been a scientist if I didn't suck so bad at word problems.

I have to estimate water volume somewhat frequently when filling or drawing down our wetlands and dawg training ponds. So I needed to learn a few basic facts. One acre-foot is the volume of water sufficient to cover an acre of land to a depth of 1 foot, = 43560 cubic feet, approximately 325851 U.S. gallons.

In your problem above, you stated that the area is 25 miles and 5" in depth. I'm assuming that's precisely 25 square miles. If so, that means you have an area that is 696,960,000 sq ft (I used 5 miles squared = 25 miles X 43,560 to compute total square feet).

696,960,000 is also the number of cubic feet (1 ft sqare by 1 ft deep) in 25 square miles. Divide that by 43,560 (sq ft in an acre) and you get 16,000 acres.

16,000 acres X 325,851 (gals per acre foot of water) equals 5,213,616,000 gallons of water in a 25 square mile area that is exactly 1 foot deep.

Divide that by 12 to get gallons per inch and multiply back by 5 and you will find that there are 2,172,340,000 gallons of water in that 25 square mile area five inches deep.

8)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
WOW.... that's a lot.

If you are wondering what I was doing.... I was surfing around USGS.gov and wandered into the Yellowstone area. I was reading the report on the north side rising. It had risen about 5 inches over appr. 25 miles between the years 2000 and 2004. I wanted a better visual of how much (say... molten rock or whatever) would be under that area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Buckyball said:
Hope all our math work helped your inquiring mind out :)
IT DID..... and by the way...... *smoochies* Thank you very much.
 
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