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There is someone who just moved in a home near me and she leaves her horses halter AND lead line attached to him all the time. I have seen the poor thing trip over it, and have also seen it tangled around his front leg (with him trying to get it off). :mad:

I tried getting into their yard to remove the line, but it is locked, plus she has a big dog back there.

I tried researching the dangers of letting pastured horses drag their lead lines behind them (because I KNOW this is not a safe thing to do), but couldn't find anything. Can you guys help me research some information so I can leave it on her door????

Thanks.
 

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I have seen some old time ranchers do this to help halter break the horse. The stepping on the lead rope teaching them to respect the lead rope. It is not my way of working with horses, but I can understand why they do it.

Usually I have seen it done on horse from the west that have never been handled. Those horses have been out in the pastures for at least 2 years if not 3 before they are brought up to the barn to work with. Once they get a halter and lead rope on it will stay on until they can handle the horse.

Can you understand what I am trying to say. These new neighbors might be of the old school. You might go down sometime they are there just to say HI.
 

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If you were my neighbor and tried to get into my pasture to remove something I put on MY horse, you would be sitting your butt in jail. Because it is not your idea of how to do things doesn't mean that everyone shouldn't do it. Like the last person said it's old school, not your way but ways others do it. Jeeze respect other peoples property!! ::)
 

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If the halter fits well, it's probably okay as long as it's just a lead line with no chain shank over the nose or under the chin. A lot of people "ground tie" a horse like this and most horses don't go off too far but graze contendedly. As long as the line can't get wrapped around two legs at once, I wouldn't worry too much. I wouldn't LIKE it, nor would I let my horse out like that, but I don't think it would do much harm.

If it's a long line with chain shank over the nose or under the chin, then I'd be knocking on their door and questioning the safety of it. I had a horse that got away from me with a chain over her nose, and about tore her face off, it was a nasty, nasty gash and I had a very hard time catching her.

My own horses are naked. I rarely use a halter at all. I simply throw a lead rope over their necks to lead them in and out of the barn/pasture.
 

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It is a way of halter-breaking a horse. People do use this (as lablover said) with horses like BLMs that have never been halter broken or handled.

It is old-school and not very accepted anymore. However, it is a method, and it appears to be her chosen method.

However, while Wendy's way of telling you was not particularly polite- you're not really a horse person and it is her horse. She likely knows exactly what she's doing.

And inhumanely is a bit dramatic for this. While I would never have used it on my ex-racehorses, it's not inhumane.
 

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gabbys mom said:
It is a way of halter-breaking a horse. People do use this (as lablover said) with horses like BLMs that have never been halter broken or handled.

It is old-school and not very accepted anymore. However, it is a method, and it appears to be her chosen method.

However, while Wendy's way of telling you was not particularly polite- you're not really a horse person and it is her horse. She likely knows exactly what she's doing.

And inhumanely is a bit dramatic for this. While I would never have used it on my ex-racehorses, it's not inhumane.
Actually, I have grown up riding horses and had a former trainer whose horse broke its neck via the same manner. It spooked and stepped on the line with it's back foot when it took off and snapped its neck. While this may be an accepted method, I still think it's really sad and unsafe. I can see her doing it while she's home to supervise the horse, but not when she's gone. Not to mention, the pasture is not very condusive to horses.

BTW - I'm ignoring Wendy's rudeness. ;)
 

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You can ignore my rudeness all you want but I wanted to be blunt. ;) So yeah maybe I was rude but to try and get on someone else's property is so not cool. Everyone is sitting here telling you "yeah it's safe it's how some people halter train". If your looking for someone to gasp and say how awful well it doesn't look like it's gonna happen. ::)
 

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Wendy said:
If you were my neighbor and tried to get into my pasture to remove something I put on MY horse, you would be sitting your butt in jail. Because it is not your idea of how to do things doesn't mean that everyone shouldn't do it. Like the last person said it's old school, not your way but ways others do it. Jeeze respect other peoples property!! ::)
HELL YES!!!! Or I'd get the shotgun out. It reminds me of this story, which I LOVE and is rather comical.

http://www.horseshoes.com/humor/hrsfire/yrhraron.htm


Yes, I have trained my mare my letting her loose with a leadline to graze. We picket our horses when we camp so they NEED to get used to NOT scrambling or freaking out when they step on the line. I don't know about leaving it on all the time but I have left it on for an hour while I hand graze. Both of my horses step on the line and when they feel tension they pick up their foot rather than go ballistic.
 

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ML said:
gabbys mom said:
It is a way of halter-breaking a horse. People do use this (as lablover said) with horses like BLMs that have never been halter broken or handled.

It is old-school and not very accepted anymore. However, it is a method, and it appears to be her chosen method.

However, while Wendy's way of telling you was not particularly polite- you're not really a horse person and it is her horse. She likely knows exactly what she's doing.

And inhumanely is a bit dramatic for this. While I would never have used it on my ex-racehorses, it's not inhumane.
Actually, I have grown up riding horses and had a former trainer whose horse broke its neck via the same manner. It spooked and stepped on the line with it's back foot when it took off and snapped its neck. While this may be an accepted method, I still think it's really sad and unsafe. I can see her doing it while she's home to supervise the horse, but not when she's gone. Not to mention, the pasture is not very condusive to horses.

BTW - I'm ignoring Wendy's rudeness. ;)
I've seen an OTTB break it leg by stepping on the lead rope while hand grazing. Lead rope wasn't even on the ground. They used a chain and wrapped the chain in half as a loop. Horse put foot through chain and was stuck. This stuff happens. You would not believe the trouble horses can get into. That said, I would never loop a chain after seeing that.
 
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Ground tying is a really important skill for a horse to learn. How she teaches it is her business.

If someone were coming on to my property uninvited, I'd be breaking out some "old school" techniques too :) If you want to get to know your new neighbor, take over some baked goods, welcome her to the neighborhood and go meet her horse. Ask her if she's teaching her horse to ground tie, or not to spook from the lead rope. Get the full story. Don't judge from a distance.

Tootiesmom is right, horses get themselves in a lot of crap. That's why teaching them to ground tie, not to spook when they step on a line, not to spook when their tail gets something under it, etc is important.

Like I said, get to know your neighbor before you judge if she's being inhumane. She may be the nicest person you ever meet. If she's not then you know for sure instead of guessing.
 

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I definitely think its a training method, although it's not good to let the rope get too long. It's not a method I'd use, but I don't think it's necessarily cruel, either. Have you seen the horse having any problems getting tangled up in the rope? If that were the case I would be sure and tell the owner what you saw. Hopefully the owner wants the horse to learn respect for the rope and not hurt itself.
 
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I hope it's not too long either. Wouldn't be my first choice of methods but everyone has their own way and this horse might be a particular PITA. It could be incredibly hard to catch as well. That could be part of it.
 

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Although I don't know much about horses and their training methods, I do use methods in dog training that not everyone approves of. Some people find a prong collar inhumane. I don't believe it to be and have used one on all my dogs. I have also used an electronic collar. I would not appreciate someone else telling me what is or is not an appropriate method in their opinion. And trespassing on my property to remove a training tool without my consent...I'd be going old school on them, too.

Before anyone gets their panties in a bunch, I do not leave ANY type of collar on my dogs. Nor do I use an e-collar to train. :)
 

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I have used this method inside of a round pen with my stubborn Arab mix. He steps on the lead, bobs his head, moves his foot and keeps going.

I have let my pups carry a leash around to get used to it. It is "kind of" the same thing.
 
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