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I just posted a little blurb on my blog about the benefits of guard-training labrador retrievers (but ONLY if you have a knowledgeable trainer to guide you and perhaps do it for you), and I got a comment pretty quickly that thought any sort of guard dog training for labradors is a bad idea. Any thoughts? I'm of the opinion that it can be very helpful in certain situations.
 

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traininglabs said:
I just posted a little blurb on my blog about the benefits of guard-training labrador retrievers (but ONLY if you have a knowledgeable trainer to guide you and perhaps do it for you), and I got a comment pretty quickly that thought any sort of guard dog training for labradors is a bad idea. Any thoughts? I'm of the opinion that it can be very helpful in certain situations.
I've trained guard and defence dogs for the Royal Dutch Airforce and for the Dutch MP, ofcourse you could use for example a Jack Russel Terriër, but i doubt if that dogs gets the proper effect ;)

And yes, a German or Belgium shepperd whould have more succes as such a dog then a Labrador whould do ;)

So, if it is strictly for training .. It could be *just* a idea, but in my opinion, you could better get a dog that suits youre needs better for this type of training, and let the Labrador (or any other type of retriever) doing the 'thing' he's good at -> Retrieving!
 

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I agree with Felix that there are many other dogs more suitable for guard dog training than Labs. For one thing, so many people assume Labs are so people friendly they might not pay sufficient respect to a Lab.

As for
True .. but most thing(s) could be trained in and out
a great deal will depend on the Lab's early social experience. If a Lab has been properly socialized around people and other dogs during its first 6 months of life, it could be very hard or impossible to change the temperament and reactions later on.

Converesely, if a Lab has not been properly socialized around people and other dogs during its first 6 months of life, it could be impossible to achieve that at an older age.
 

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Bob Pr. said:
I agree with Felix that there are many other dogs more suitable for guard dog training than Labs. For one thing, so many people assume Labs are so people friendly they might not pay sufficient respect to a Lab.

As for
True .. but most thing(s) could be trained in and out
a great deal will depend on the Lab's early social experience. If a Lab has been properly socialized around people and other dogs during its first 6 months of life, it could be very hard or impossible to change the temperament and reactions later on.

Converesely, if a Lab has not been properly socialized around people and other dogs during its first 6 months of life, it could be impossible to achieve that at an older age.
This counts for all type of dogs, not only Labradors ;)
 

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Any thoughts? I'm of the opinion that it can be very helpful in certain situations.
I disagree. Training a Lab to perform as a guard dog is like training a Bulldog to be a bird dog, or a Basset Hound to pull a sled. Most breeds of dog are or were bred for a purpose, and for Labs, a guard dog is not it. They are retrievers and do not have the temperament required for this type of work. CAN you train a Lab to bite a sleeve? sure. Would I want to encourage that behaviour in a breed famed for their soft mouth? no. Would a Lab that had been trained to bite a sleeve likely bite a person, minus a sleeve, in a real situation? I highly doubt it.

This then the begs the question of why you would want to train your Lab to bite. Simply put, this is just not necessary when generally speaking a barking dog is more than enough of a deterrent.

Frankly, the last thing I would want to do with such a gentle tempered breed is to encourage aggressive behaviour (even 'controlled' aggression). With other breeds that have a developed prey and defensive drive, protection work comes naturally. With Labs, they would need to be pushed to encourage this type of behaviour which is unnatural to the breed.
 

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^^^ agree with Trickster. Guard work is not in their genetic makeup like other dog breeds. I'm sure it's possible but you just don't get a Lab for it to attack an intruder. :no: You can get a Lab to effectively deter intruders by barking loudly without too much trouble or even lick them to death :laugh: but not attack them... it's just not in their nature.
 

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Please tell me how a 17 year old is running a training site for Labradors when I don't think you even own one?

and i concur with trixter.
 

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Dani said:
Please tell me how a 17 year old is running a training site for Labradors when I don't think you even own one?

and i concur with trixter.
Running a website about training dogs isnt stupid, even for a person who is just 17 years of age. But, dont understand, that a dog who isnt even a guard dog at all, try to train to be one .. Hmm, i dont know in wich corner i must place this ;)
 

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I know of someone that put Sch3's on two different labradors.

I know of someone that trained their cocker spaniel to herd sheep.

I know of someone that trained their border collie to fetch ducks.

Why not, what's the harm? A labrador might require quite a bit more work to achieve bite work, and some of the jumps required of Sch. and french ring dogs might be impossible for a show-bred labrador, but it's all a training game - or should be, anyway.
 

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kaytris said:
I know of someone that put Sch3's on two different labradors.

I know of someone that trained their cocker spaniel to herd sheep.

I know of someone that trained their border collie to fetch ducks.

Why not, what's the harm? A labrador might require quite a bit more work to achieve bite work, and some of the jumps required of Sch. and french ring dogs might be impossible for a show-bred labrador, but it's all a training game - or should be, anyway.
I agree with you that it is doable - but if you really want a dog to train for Schutzhund - why not get a breed that is already part way there? I'd much prefer a Mal or a Dutch Shepherd than dog whose bite has been bred out of them.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
kaytris said:
Why not, what's the harm? A labrador might require quite a bit more work to achieve bite work, and some of the jumps required of Sch. and french ring dogs might be impossible for a show-bred labrador, but it's all a training game - or should be, anyway.
This is similar to my reasoning.

Also, I didn't think that "guard dog training" necessarily meant training a dog towards aggression -- perhaps I was a little bit mislead on the meaning of the term.
 

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traininglabs said:
kaytris said:
Why not, what's the harm? A labrador might require quite a bit more work to achieve bite work, and some of the jumps required of Sch. and french ring dogs might be impossible for a show-bred labrador, but it's all a training game - or should be, anyway.
This is similar to my reasoning.

Also, I didn't think that "guard dog training" necessarily meant training a dog towards aggression -- perhaps I was a little bit mislead on the meaning of the term.
Those dogs who are used in public services like the police for example, they've go evry night with the handler home, to stay over there. So, such dogs arent trained for agression. Agression in a dog is very easy to acomplish, but it isnt any good for working with, during the lack of stability such dogs often shows ;)

But the shepperd(s) and for example the rottweiler breeds, are more often commonly used for such work, because those breeds, are beeing breed for such objective ;)

And if you put enough time and effort in to it, yes .. Even a 'show bred Labrador' can be learned to be as a guard dog, as you allready said .. It's all up to the training
 

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Also, I didn't think that "guard dog training" necessarily meant training a dog towards aggression -- perhaps I was a little bit mislead on the meaning of the term.
You said on your website 'bite and attack' training. If training a dog to bite and attack doesn't involve aggression, what does it involve?
 

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Trickster said:
Also, I didn't think that "guard dog training" necessarily meant training a dog towards aggression -- perhaps I was a little bit mislead on the meaning of the term.
You said on your website 'bite and attack' training. If training a dog to bite and attack doesn't involve aggression, what does it involve?
Yups, that's agression, and such training is even forbidden by law in my country, even for the public services (police, army, etc ...) ;)

And a well trained and behaved german or belgium shepperd doesnt kill and attack, not even on command ;)
 

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Felix said:
[And a well trained and behaved german or belgium shepperd doesnt kill and attack, not even on command ;)
Actually, attacking on command to bring a target down and/or hold them from fleeing is exactly what a well trained police dog does do. Are you saying that police dogs in Holland make no contact with suspects they are intercepting?
 

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BigBrownDog said:
Felix said:
[And a well trained and behaved german or belgium shepperd doesnt kill and attack, not even on command ;)
Actually, attacking on command to bring a target down and/or hold them from fleeing is exactly what a well trained police dog does do. Are you saying that police dogs in Holland make no contact with suspects they are intercepting?
Thats not a attack out of agression ;)

If a dog attacks out of agression, the change that a suspect survive is brought back to 0
 

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