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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guyz :D

I'm preparing to take the GMAT exam. I really hadn't thought about going to grad school till I started looking into expanding my finance degree with additional Accounting courses (to qualify for more jobs once the market goes back up) and my undergraduate advisor said I should look into MS Accounting.

So here I go.

I got a GMAT prep book (thanks mom!) and just completed the diagnostic part... the results weren't surprising: "Excellent" in the math sections and "Above Average" (higher than I expected) in the verbal sections. Still going to practice both but obviously I'll have to focus on the verbal.

Anyways... I was wondering if anyone on here had any advice or personal experience with the GMAT they wouldn't mind sharing. Thanks in advance!
 

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None here Linds, but grats! I start a simple corporate law clerks course next week, and I'm scared shitless - so kudos to you for moving forward!
 

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That is great Lindsay! Good for you.

No real advice on the GMAT here, but from taking the MCAT, I can just say that practice questions/tests are your best friends!
 

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Hat's off to you.

As a two-time survivor (barely) of the LSATs, whose bottom-of-the-barrel performance was too shameful to even bother sharing with a law school, you have my utmost admiration.
 

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Hey Lindsay. I just took it a couple of months ago, because for some reason I decided it was a good idea to do a part-time professional MBA (which I started in January). I've always found the verbal easier than the math on every standardized test I've ever taken (SAT, GRE, and most recently GMAT), so doing practice tests and reviewing the book were definitely helpful. That's as far as I went, though, I didn't do any courses or "formal" study, and I did fine. Probably could have done better if I'd prepped more thoroughly, but balancing work, life, and now school (again!) meant that this time I was going to do what it took to do well enough for admission to the program of my choice but not kill myself to do as well as I possibly could.

One heads-up: you really do need to think on your feet with the essay portion. Practice writing concise, clear arguments within the time allotted and you'll do well. But it's easy to get bogged down. Did you do the paper version in a prep book or an online computer-based version? If the former, remember that in the actual computer-based test format, not only can you not go back to a skipped problem, the questions' difficulty levels increase the more correct answers you get. So time management while taking the test is the most essential skill you can develop.

Good luck!

- Ursula
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the encouragement guys!

The test I did was a "diagnostic" in the book.... basically just identifying where you need to work on stuff... I have yet to do the free downloadable practice exam (which is more accurate because of the way the test is really composed)... probably will do that soon.

The essay part is definitely going to be the hardest part for me. I abhor writing... I really do and essays always freak me out. I almost always say what I think "needs" to be said in half the space/time/word count that is recommended and I'm not very good at "bullshitting." (though I admit I'm better at it now after 5 years of college :p )

I am not going to do any formal study... way too expensive and I honestly don't think I will need it (though I'm sure it would improve my score somewhat... just don't think it's worth it).
 

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Thanks for the encouragement guys!

The test I did was a "diagnostic" in the book.... basically just identifying where you need to work on stuff... I have yet to do the free downloadable practice exam (which is more accurate because of the way the test is really composed)... probably will do that soon.

The essay part is definitely going to be the hardest part for me. I abhor writing... I really do and essays always freak me out. I almost always say what I think "needs" to be said in half the space/time/word count that is recommended and I'm not very good at "bullshitting." (though I admit I'm better at it now after 5 years of college :p )

I am not going to do any formal study... way too expensive and I honestly don't think I will need it (though I'm sure it would improve my score somewhat... just don't think it's worth it).
Yeah, those prep classes are extravagant when it comes to price. You may want to look into purchasing some full legnth practice exams online from a reputable organization though...I know that they really helped me. I just did one for the few days before the real exam, and timed myself exactly the way the exam was with similar break intervals, etc. Then on test day, the routine was nothing new, and I was familiar with the strategies that the questions emplyed to assess my skills.
 

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The essay part is definitely going to be the hardest part for me.
Excuse yourself to the ladies room.

Text me the question.

Give me 10 minutes.
 

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1st--don't bother taking those expensive Kaplan classes. Sounds like they can't teach you much anyway, since your scores are pretty high. I took them for the LSAT and honestly, they didn't help me much. The main thing is to find a strategy that works for you. Taking multiple tests will do that just as effectively as taking a classroom based test prep IMO.

I am assuming you know the GMAT is all electronic? So if you do a paper test, you are not quite getting the full experience/new grading system. If you haven't already, download the free powerprep software from ETS (makers of GMAT and GRE). You can do sample sections and full length tests that really simulate the test taking experience. They also have sample essays you can read with the scores and prep sections.

Bad thing about the multiple choice sections now is that you can't go back and review your answers, but the whole test process is much faster and self-paced. And you know your score as soon as you take it! (All except for the writing portions).

I took the GMAT a few years ago and the GRE fairly recently. I just had to make above a certain score to get in, though--I didn't have to have a super competitive score.
 
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