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Discussion Starter #1
My father and Cinnamon are the lamb eaters in this household. It is Cinnamon's favorite food I make sure they both get it for their birthdays they love it so much.

If you have a Costco membership they usually have fresh boneless leg of lamb for under $25 each from Australia.

I bought one today and came home took the twine off and cut it into 4 hunks. I paid $19.79 for it. One section is currently marinating in olive oil, garlic and rosemary. We will grill it for them tonight while everyone else is having rib eyes. The other 3 pieces have been repackaged and frozen for future use.

We have found it is a reasonable price for them to get their lamb fix. (Plus it is cooked on the grill so the whole house doesn't smell of lamb which the rest of us hate).
 

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Thats where I usually get ours. I decided to pick up a tri- tip but now I'm second guessing myself. Grilled marinated leg of lamb sounds so yummy!!
 

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That's a GREAT price for lamb, stateside! The last time Tud and I looked at a rack at Sam's (about 4 years ago) it was nearly $80.00!
Not much call for lamb in Oklahoma, but I can find it here and there. I'd pay the price and enjoy every bit of it. Rack or chops... doesn't matter. Freshly mixed mint sauce, roasted new potatoes......... oooooooooooooooh! :)
 

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I usually get a boneless leg of lamb at Sam's, but just got two small ones at ALdi's for ~$15 each. I butterfly them all the way, split in half or thirds, depending on the size, and freeze separately. I marinate overnight in olive oil, wine, lemon juice, rosemary, and garlic, then grill. Several people who professed to 'hate' lamb will eat it this way every time I make it!

Rack of lamb is much more expensive, so are chops, so this is how I usually get my lamb fix. Once in a while, I find some loin chops on the last 'sell by' date marked as "Manager's Special and greatly reduced in price." I snap those up fast!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I also snap up lamb chops if they are marked down for dad. But the leg of lamb is so much cheaper so I can afford it. It is the only food Cinnamon drools for when she smells it cooking. But we have to limit her intake as it gives her the trots.
 

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We buy a lamb every year from a neighbor who has excellent lambs that they show at the State Fair , etc. We have so much lamb is it coming out our ears and I end up giving last years away, and have sometimes even thrown it away when it gets to be 2 years old in the freezer. It is MUCH cheaper than buying it in the store. I like to fix "lamb burger" on my Foremans grill because all the grease drips off, we have different kinds of chops, I made a mean lamb stew last winter, and we make kabobs on the grill in the summer. I am going to trade some for pork that my sister and her husband have (bought a whole pig and have too much)
 

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We buy ours locally and it is really good. Denny did not think he would like it and was surprised. We mostly buy the ground lamb, though. It is cheaper than store bought as well.
 

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We buy ours locally and it is really good. Denny did not think he would like it and was surprised. We mostly buy the ground lamb, though. It is cheaper than store bought as well.
This is what we do as well. FoodieFarmGirl's blog has a great recipe for portabello mushrooms stuffed with ground lamb and feta. So good :)
 

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I like lamb, but I don't buy it.

I like it at Greek Easter (also this weekend) slow roasted over a spit, but we haven't been invited to my uncle's so, we will miss the lamb.
 

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Where I grew up, there was a pocket of cuisine that's not really statewide, I guess it went back to the Irish sheep herders that settled there. Mutton is actually really popular there. Pretty much all or our big meals (aside from Christmas and Thanksgiving) were barbecue mutton and burgoo.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You can get mutton up north on both the Hopi and Navajo reservations.
 

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Where I grew up, there was a pocket of cuisine that's not really statewide, I guess it went back to the Irish sheep herders that settled there. Mutton is actually really popular there. Pretty much all or our big meals (aside from Christmas and Thanksgiving) were barbecue mutton and burgoo.

We had mutton quite a bit when I was a kid and it was readlily available. I don't recall seeing it locally anymore. Just like most Northeast small cities the ethnic mix has shifted and we have a very small Irish population these days. Of course you can't tell on St Patricks Day when everyone is Irish.
 

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We had mutton quite a bit when I was a kid and it was readlily available. I don't recall seeing it locally anymore. Just like most Northeast small cities the ethnic mix has shifted and we have a very small Irish population these days. Of course you can't tell on St Patricks Day when everyone is Irish.
It's really odd, inside the city you still see a lot of mutton, outside the city bbq means pork or beef. It doesn't hurt that the Catholics there make an outstanding burgoo and some of the best barbecue I've ever eaten. Although there are a two restaurants that specialize in mutton, it's largely the Catholic churches and their picnics that are keeping the tradition alive. Their burgoo recipes are passed down through the generations, and don't even bother asking what it is.
 
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