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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, I'll admit right up front that I'm a total worry wort, and I was going to pm you these questions, but I thought I'd just post it because maybe other worriers have the same questions.

Here's the story on my dogs: Bodie doesn't have much interest in food and eats rather slowly, while Sam nearly jumps out of his skin with excitement at the prospect of food and swallows as much as he can as quickly as he can. They eat 1.5 cups each, two times a day.

Is Bodie at nearly no risk of bloat because he eats so slowly?
Sam sometimes likes to roll on his back for a minute after eating, should I try to stop him from doing that?
Sam often burps after he eats, and I worry if he doesn't. Should I worry if he doesn't burp?
I got Sam a "brake-fast" bowl that slows his eating. Do you think they are good?
How quickly does bloat show up after eating? Sometimes I'm afraid that we'll leave for work, and they'll bloat and by the time we come home it will be too late.
How common is bloat? I feel like I shouldn't be worrying this much.
 

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Al good questions.
From my research know that Labs are not in the top ten breeds at risk however, as I experienced, it can occur. Rapid gulping of food is thought to be one of the causes of bloat. You are doing everything I know of to slow Sam down but I do believe that the burping indicates he is still swallowing excess air as he gulps. I really do not know of anything else you could do.
In my case the symptoms occurred within fifteen minutes after Jake ate and I would tend to logically assume that if rapid eating creates a bloat then the symptoms would show up very soon.
One research paper I read stated the following regarding prevention:
"he most common advice given to owners of large breed dogs is based on experiences such as the one described previously. If there is a high risk, it is best to avoid one large meal per day. The dog should be fed at least twice daily; he should be discouraged from eating rapidly, and he should not be allowed to play actively before and after feeding. The dog should have access to water continuously so there is less chance he will drink a large amount immediately after eating."

All you can reasonable do is 1. Be familiar with the symptoms, 2. If you suspect a bloat then get to the emergency Vet ASAP, 3. Insist on a thorough exam, including an xray to verify whether or not a bloat has occurred.
 

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Thank you! I'll try to stop worrying so much. I don't let them drink a lot of water after eating, and I feed them at least an hour before I leave for work and they just go back to bed after eating in the morning, so they aren't running around.
 
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