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Is there any way that I can prevent Fraser from drooling over food? It mainly happens when he is getting fed at breakfast and dinner time (after we have our breakfast and dinner) and also if we happen to have something nice to eat through the day.

He has his bed in the laundry that he is told to sit on before his meals, and there is also a large matt in the living room that he sits on while we have our dinner or some snacks while watching television.

The drool can range from a few small drops to a full-on constant dripping! Is there some way that I can prevent this? The drool mainly ends up landing on his matt in the living room, on his bed and also on his chest if he happens to be in a very good sit.

I should eventually post some photos of his drooling - it is a sight to behold!

Hopefully some of you have some remedies or advice, if not... it will just have to be something that I will have to put up with...

Regards, Shaun (sticks1977)
 

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Well, for heaven's sakes, feed him FASTER!! LOL Sorry. No clue how to stop that other than to fix his food when he's not inside and don't eat in front of him. Otherwise, at least have a camera to capture the olympic drool fest. ;)
 

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Is there any way that I can prevent Fraser from drooling over food?
Yeah feed him quicker! :rolleyes::D

I always made my 2 sit & wait for their food as part of their training. Jo was always drooling. Of course, the longer he had to wait, the worse it was. :D

You have a typical Lab. I suggest you invest in a good mop & bucket. :D
 

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Typical lab. If my two are in the kitchen when I'm cooking I have slipped in the drool on the floor. So be careful. :D
 

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I am pretty sure Labs are genetically programmed for drool. Angus drools while his dinner is being made, and then does a few airborne spin/jumps while the food is being delivered to the floor. This results in drool being slung to great distances across the kitchen. We have a stainless steel oven. Boy, was that a bad choice. Have you ever tried to clean drool off stainless steel? :D
 

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Typical Lab -- genetically programmed to drool.

My Puff is a self-limiting Lab re: food BUT when there's any snack in the offing, her saliva hose gets turned on and there's a steady stream of saliva from her mouth to the floor -- or car seat -- or or my lap -- OR wherever she happens to be.

 

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I always made my 2 sit & wait for their food as part of their training. Jo was always drooling. Of course, the longer he had to wait, the worse it was. :D

You have a typical Lab. I suggest you invest in a good mop & bucket. :D
I agree. Dexter waits for the command before tucking in. However, when he is waiting for us to put it together, he drools all over. :D
 

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I think you can blame this behavior on Psychologist like BobPr!!!!! :D I think the guy's name was Pavlov or something like that. :confused: He trained all dogs to drool on the anticipation of food.;);)
 

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I must have one of the rare non-drooling labs. The only thing that makes Bauer drool is eating a lot of snow. After coming in from playing in the snow he drools like crazy, but food never makes him drool.
 

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Milly is a LADY therefore she keeps drool to a minimum but yes, if you make her wait for her food longer than normal the drool happensm no matter what.
 

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Perfectly normal and you can't do a blessed things about it. :D Champ drools all the time, even when there is no food is the offing. Buddy only drools when he is anticipating a tasty treat. Champ's drool is the long, slimy kind; Buddy's is more akin to droplets of water.
 

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OMG, I never ever wanted a drooling dog. I have two of them. Rush will drip, drip, drip just a little. Boo, it's like turning on a faucet! and look out if she shakes her head, it becomes a monsoon.:eek: Boo needs a drool bucket. I guess the answer to your question, is nope nothing can be done except feeding faster.:D
 

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Ed, FWIW, Ivan Pavlov was a Russian physiologist who was interested in digestive processes, saliva and salivation.

In the course of his experiments on dogs' salivating, he serendipitously happened on procedures which involved conditioned reflexes (aka classical conditioning) and, after seeing its effects, he lost his interest in drool. He spent the remainder of his career investigating it and the variables effecting its strengths.

Conditioned reflexes and classical conditioning was picked up in the early 1930s by USA psychologists (John B Watson was the most famous). American psychology as a result became heavily biased toward viewing learning and experiential factors as the most important variable in shaping behavior; heredity or interactions with hereditary factors or the existence of imprinting (i = disproportionately large effects of early experiences) was essentially ignored for several decades.

 
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