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Thanks -- there's a great deal of similarity in the questions they were asking and in the results they found. When there's this research at the U of Bristol (UK), UPenn (USA), and U of Cordoba (Spain) and they're all reporting results at the same time, that doesn't seem accidental, does it? (I'm not suggesting they cooked their results.)

 

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Am I interpreting the third link wrong? It seems to contradict the first two.

"According to Joaquín Pérez-Guisado, the main author of the study and a researcher from the UCO, some of the factors that cause aggressiveness in dogs are: first-time dog ownership; failure to subject the dog to basic obedience training; spoiling or pampering the dog; not using physical punishment when it is required; buying a dog as a present, as a guard dog or on impulse; spaying female dogs; leaving the dog with a constant supply of food, or spending very little time with the dog in general and on its walks."

and

"To correct the animal’s behaviour, the owner should handle it appropriately and “re-establish dominance over the dog”, the researcher adds. In terms of physical punishment, Pérez-Guisado points out that “this method cannot be used with all dogs given the danger involved, although it could be used to re-establish dominance over puppies or small and easy-to-control dogs”. However, “it should never be used as justification for treating a dog brutally, since physical punishment should be used more as a way to frighten and demonstrate the dominance we have over the dog than to inflict great suffering on the animal”, the vet states."

Physical punishment? Really?
 

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Am I interpreting the third link wrong? It seems to contradict the first two.

"According to Joaquín Pérez-Guisado, the main author of the study and a researcher from the UCO, some of the factors that cause aggressiveness in dogs are: first-time dog ownership; failure to subject the dog to basic obedience training; spoiling or pampering the dog; not using physical punishment when it is required; buying a dog as a present, as a guard dog or on impulse; spaying female dogs; leaving the dog with a constant supply of food, or spending very little time with the dog in general and on its walks."

and

"To correct the animal’s behaviour, the owner should handle it appropriately and “re-establish dominance over the dog”, the researcher adds. In terms of physical punishment, Pérez-Guisado points out that “this method cannot be used with all dogs given the danger involved, although it could be used to re-establish dominance over puppies or small and easy-to-control dogs”. However, “it should never be used as justification for treating a dog brutally, since physical punishment should be used more as a way to frighten and demonstrate the dominance we have over the dog than to inflict great suffering on the animal”, the vet states."

Physical punishment? Really?
I think that article was poorly written. The author should clarify what is meant by "physical punishment".
 

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I've never heard that spaying a female dog causes aggressiveness before. The first two links were consistent with what I have read about training, but the third seemed to be out in left field!
 

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The third article is all over the place and reinforces some urban myths IMO. While there is some thought that spay at a certain point in a female dog's cycle can "fix" a level of testosterone in their system - I don't think that this necessarily = aggression.

And - leaving food out makes a dog aggressive??? I think it makes them fat.

I do agree with both of the other sources. Maybe the one from the University of Cordoba suffered in the translation.
 

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I have issue w/ the oversimplification of the problem on all accounts. If truth were known, it's probably a little bit of all of the above--- and it's interesting that they are all downplaying genetics which I think is *total* BS. I've seen the trends in lines, yes, even Labradors.

I do think a worked dog is a better companion, and I do believe that food should in many cases be earned, not just "there" for a free lunch, but then I believe that to be true in human society as well. If there is never an incentive to serve, there is less of desire... Anne
 
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