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Discussion Starter #1
Is there anything I can use to help the dandruff on my black dog. He so needs some Head and Shoulders!

-Shannon
 

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It could be food.
Flax seed oil could help or when Erns wasn't too bad can of fish in natural oil is good. Saves trying to work out the amounts.

Is this what it is like. This is food allergy. Usually it is finer dandruf. This is snow.

 

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Is there anything I can use to help the dandruff on my black dog. He so needs some Head and Shoulders!

-Shannon
Too funny you say that- for dandruff, you can use Selsun Blue or Head and Shoulders shampoos. Don't do like I did, tho- out of habit, I diluted the entire bottle of Selsun Blue. LOL I used the Head and Shoulders that has a conditioner in it a few weeks ago on Caleb. A couple of days later he was out in the rain, and still smelled good. Also, try adding an oil to his food (salmon, fish, flax seed, olive, etc). You can get salmon oil tablets in the supplement aisle at most supermarkets and WalMart. Last but not least, brush him more often, it stimulates the oils in the skin. :smile:
 

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I know with Jack its definately food related.i switched to taste of the wild ,and his coat looks so much better.
 

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Shelby has the same thing, definitely food related, switched her to Natural Balance limited ingredient about a month ago, her skin is soooo miuch better.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
He has been on timberwolf since we got him 3 yrs ago. Do you still think it could be the food? I know it is very cold and dry here, I was thinking it was that. Also have had the fire place on now and them.

How quick do the suppliments work? Is it a quick fix? Or something that will have to take time to work?
 

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My vet says they can develope allergies even if they have been on the food for some time.

I was also told humidty could do it, or dry by the fire. I am not sure.
If I were you if you can change the food do so. Don't give any other treats though. I made that mistake and thought oh this food is not good, when in fact the treats had the same ingredients the food did.Often corn or wheat.
Try a new food for about 6 weeks. Then introduce treats or other foods.

Or you could just try the oil. It takes a few days with Erns.

Erns coat on new food and 2-3 small tins of fish in natural oil every week.

 

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Three possible things, best when all 3 are followed at the same time:

-- NEVER USE shampoo formulated for people (or even those labeled ultra mild for babies). If you DO use a shampoo, use only those formulated for dogs. Human skin is many times more acidic than dog skin is and ANY shampoo for humans will ALWAYS be very irritating to dog skin. Even thorough flushing and rinsing with water after lathering a dog with human shampoo will NEVER be sufficient.

-- In those climates needing heat during cold seasons, use a humidifier. They can be added to most hot air furnaces for $3-400. Or get and use a whole house humidifier (about $150) that uses 2 jugs of water (about 5 gallons total). These will need refueling between 1X to every other day. Humidified air is FAR more comfortable to every one's skin and allows the thermostat to be set much lower and maintain comfort.

-- Give a fish oil capsule (on a dab of peanut butter) once a day.

 

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CJ gets dandruffy in the late winter. We run a humidifier and give him fish oil pills the vet sold us during Jan-March and it usually dos the trick.
 

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...-- NEVER USE shampoo formulated for people (or even those labeled ultra mild for babies). If you DO use a shampoo, use only those formulated for dogs. Human skin is many times more acidic than dog skin is and ANY shampoo for humans will ALWAYS be very irritating to dog skin. Even thorough flushing and rinsing with water after lathering a dog with human shampoo will NEVER be sufficient...
Usually I totally agree with that statement, however, Selsun Blue and Head and Shoulders was recommended to me by numerous people who were told by their vets it was OK. But as a regular, every time you bath shampoo, definitely stick with those formulated for dogs.
 

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My 3 get an omega fish oil tab in their food every day and have beautiful coats, however, I brushed them all the other day as they are all moulting and it left them all with a bit of dandruff. I got a cloth and dampened it and wiped them over and it was gone.
 

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Usually I totally agree with that statement, however, Selsun Blue and Head and Shoulders was recommended to me by numerous people who were told by their vets it was OK. But as a regular, every time you bath shampoo, definitely stick with those formulated for dogs.
In that case, it's impossible to tell whether the numerous people who told you that misinterpreted what their vets said or whether the vets who said that got their degrees through correspondence school and missed out on important knowldge about dog skin.

Have YOU checked this recommendation with YOUR vet?

I've previously asked my vets at Kansas State's CollVetMed about using human shampoos (not specifically Selsun Blue or H&S) and they've agreed -- NEVER use shampoos or cleaning products formulated for peoples' skin on dogs' skin.

Below is a copy of what I've often posted on this subject. The second link provides information on what you can do to improve your dog's skin condition.

The link below describes the pH scale which is the scientific measure of how acidic or alkaline a substance is. The scale ranges from 0.0 (most acidic) through 7.0 (neutral, like distilled water) to 14.0 (most alkaline AKA base/basic)

http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/vchembook/184ph.html

The graph in the link below compares the pH values for humans and various animals. You'll note that human skin has a pH value around 4.8 (acidic) while Labrador skin has a pH around 6.8 (very close to neutral).

Since pH values are on a logarithmic scale, a value on the scale that differs from another by as much as 1.0 (say 6.1 and 7.1 or 8.6 and 9.6) is 10X that of another that's 1.0 distant. So, since the skin of humans and Labradors are 2 whole integers apart (4.8 to 6.8 ) that's 10 x 10 = 100; so human skin is 100 times more acidic than Labrador skin.

http://publications.royalcanin.com/...102343&com=27&animal=0&lang=2&session=6478160

 

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Bauer gets dry skin in the winter, but I think it is because we heat with a woodstove. He gets salmon a couple times a week, fish oil everyday, and I always have a big pot of water steaming on the stove. It really helps a lot. In the warmer months he doesn't have a dry skin problem at all.
 
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