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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can someone explain exactly what they are and how they are "extracted" from the original grain...and why I should not be worried because the contamination occurs after these components leave their original grain form?

:-\
 

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I think some of the "contamination" can happen before the leave the original form. Corn can get a fungus, not sure about rice and wheat but I would think they could also. I thought most of the problem has come from a pesticide the different countries can use that we are not allowed to. That would be a different contamination.
 

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How the heck does Melamine get into 3 different grain sources?

Has anyone wondered to themselves about sabotage...that someone or some organization is contaminted pet food products deliberately?
 

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WeHeartLabs said:
How the heck does Melamine get into 3 different grain sources?

Has anyone wondered to themselves about sabotage...that someone or some organization is contaminted pet food products deliberately?
I had the same thought myself. Especially after I heard on the news today that the orphaned polar bear cub is now getting death threats. There are lot of animal extremist whack jobs out there that wouldn't hesitate to stoop to sabotage.
 

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The fungus aflatoxin happens before any grains are processed. Here is a link to the problems with it.
http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/toxicagents/aflatoxin/aflatoxin.html

I do find this very interesting!
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-goldstein/rice-protein-supplier-urg_b_46245.html
RSS
04.19.2007
Rice Protein Supplier Urges Nationwide Pet Food Recall (5 comments )

Agricultural products distributor Wilbur-Ellis has issued a nationwide recall of all lots of rice protein concentrate, after the Food and Drug Administration found additional samples testing positive for melamine. The company is now urging all pet food manufacturers using its rice protein concentrate to recall any pet food that may still be on supermarket shelves.

In an unfolding public health crisis already marked by inexplicable incompetence and willful foot-dragging, Wilbur-Ellis' press release would border on the comic if the implications weren't so potentially tragic:

"Last Sunday, April 15, Wilbur-Ellis notified the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that a single bag in a recent shipment of rice protein concentrate from its Chinese supplier, Binzhou Futian Biology Technology Co. Ltd., had tested positive for melamine. Unlike the other white-colored bags in that shipment, the bag in question was pink and had the word 'melamine' stenciled upon it."

You'd think, just maybe, the pink bag with the word "melamine" on it might have been a bit of a giveaway, yet on Tuesday, April 17, when I asked the FDA to confirm or deny an impending recall, and specifically mentioned that my source said "the rice protein concentrate has 'melamine' listed on the bag," the FDA categorically denied the rumor, insisting that the information on its website "is up to date."

Within hours, Natural Balance recalled products due to melamine-tainted rice protein concentrate.

And now, a few days later, we learn that the "white bags" have tested positive for melamine too, establishing a broad pattern of adulteration that we must assume to be intentional until proven otherwise.

First wheat gluten was found to be contaminated with melamine, then rice protein concentrate -- and despite FDA denials, I'm hearing corn gluten may be next. But why would manufacturers intentionally spike high-protein food additives with melamine, a urea-derived chemical used in plastic and slow-release nitrogen fertilizer? Steve Pickman, a VP at MGP Ingredients, the nation's largest domestic producer of wheat gluten, explores one theory:

"It is my understanding, but certainly unheard of in our experience, that melamine could increase the measurable nitrogen of gluten and then be mathematically converted to protein. The effect could create the appearance or illusion of raising the gluten's protein level. Understandably, any acts or practices such as this are barred in the U.S. How the U.S. can or cannot monitor and prevent these types of situations from occurring in other parts of the world is the overriding question."

It is a question the current FDA seems unwilling or unable to answer
 

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I found this on Eagle Pack web site and thought they explained some of this very well.
http://www.eaglepack.com/Pages/recall_stmt.html

Wednesday, April 18, 2007
Mishawaka, Indiana

Eagle Pack Pet Foods, Inc. understands that, while the recalled pet food has found confinement, consumers might still have a lot of questions. Be assured that none of our products have been affected by the recall prompted by Menu Foods in March 2007.

Rat poison was thought to be the contaminant in the recalled pet food, but further tests proved that levels of melamine were present.

Melamine is used combined with formaldehyde to produce melamine resin, a very durable thermosetting plastic, and of melamine foam, a polymeric cleaning product. The end products include countertops, fabrics, glues and flame-retardants. Melamine is one of the major components in Pigment Yellow 150 that is a colorant in inks and plastics. Melamine is also used as a fertilizer, but is not registered for use as such in the United States.

It is important to note that the FDA is not completely certain that melamine is the cause of the illness and deaths of the pets that have consumed the recalled product. Their investigation is continuing with advanced forensics.
Xuzhosou Anying Biologic Technology Development, an agricultural products dealer based in Xuzhou, China, sold the contaminated wheat gluten meal to the Las Vegas based company, ChemNutra who then shipped the product to pet food makers in the United States and Canada.

Fortunately, there have been no records indicating that the wheat gluten meal had been shipped to U.S. human food producers. The FDA is also conducting investigations to determine whether or not the contamination was intentional. An import alert has been issued on wheat gluten from China, banning the import of the ingredient.

Eagle Pack Pet Foods, Inc. does not use wheat gluten as an ingredient in our pet food. Wheat gluten, although not as well known, is an alternative to soy-based meat substitutes such as tofu; some types may taste even more like meat than tofu due to their chewy or stringy texture. It is often used in place of meat in Asian, vegetarian/vegan, Buddhist, and macrobiotic cuisines.

Eagle Pack Pet Foods, Inc. uses ingredients supplied from U.S. based companies with few exceptions. We import Duck meal from Germany, Anchovy & Sardine meal from Mexico, and Lamb meal from Australia. We closely monitor our incoming ingredients. All meat meals are tested by NIR analysis to determine protein, fat, fiber and moisture levels. Grains, such as rice, corn and oatmeal, are tested for mycotoxins. We have good and trusting relationships with our suppliers.

Eagle Pack Pet Foods, Inc. is regulated by the FDA, the State of Indiana, the USDA/APHIS and AAFCO.

Recently there has been an additional concern as a result of a voluntary recall by another manufacturer. The company announced the suspected ingredient is Rice Protein Concentrate that contains Melamine. At this point, the FDA has not commented and the above has not been confirmed.

As with Wheat Gluten, we do not use Rice Protein Concentrate, or as it is also called, Rice Gluten, in any of our Eagle Pack® Super Premium or Holistic Select® Formulas.

If you have fed your pet any of the pet food recalled by other manufacturers, we urge you to take them to the veterinarian and have tests performed. Kidney failure can be a painful and deadly disease, but it is also reversible with early treatment. Many other consumers are opting to stay away from products that contain wheat gluten, as the FDA warns consumers that retailers could still have the recalled product on their shelves.

Further questions can be answered by our Customer Service department: Monday thru Friday, 8am-5pm EST. 1-800-255-5959 or 1-574-259-7834.

Visit www.fda.gov for more details on the pet food recall as they progress.
 

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lablover said:
I found this on Eagle Pack web site and thought they explained some of this very well.
http://www.eaglepack.com/Pages/recall_stmt.html

Wednesday, April 18, 2007
Mishawaka, Indiana

Eagle Pack Pet Foods, Inc. understands that, while the recalled pet food has found confinement, consumers might still have a lot of questions. Be assured that none of our products have been affected by the recall prompted by Menu Foods in March 2007.

Rat poison was thought to be the contaminant in the recalled pet food, but further tests proved that levels of melamine were present.

Melamine is used combined with formaldehyde to produce melamine resin, a very durable thermosetting plastic, and of melamine foam, a polymeric cleaning product. The end products include countertops, fabrics, glues and flame-retardants. Melamine is one of the major components in Pigment Yellow 150 that is a colorant in inks and plastics. Melamine is also used as a fertilizer, but is not registered for use as such in the United States.

It is important to note that the FDA is not completely certain that melamine is the cause of the illness and deaths of the pets that have consumed the recalled product. Their investigation is continuing with advanced forensics.
Xuzhosou Anying Biologic Technology Development, an agricultural products dealer based in Xuzhou, China, sold the contaminated wheat gluten meal to the Las Vegas based company, ChemNutra who then shipped the product to pet food makers in the United States and Canada.

Fortunately, there have been no records indicating that the wheat gluten meal had been shipped to U.S. human food producers. The FDA is also conducting investigations to determine whether or not the contamination was intentional. An import alert has been issued on wheat gluten from China, banning the import of the ingredient.

Eagle Pack Pet Foods, Inc. does not use wheat gluten as an ingredient in our pet food. Wheat gluten, although not as well known, is an alternative to soy-based meat substitutes such as tofu; some types may taste even more like meat than tofu due to their chewy or stringy texture. It is often used in place of meat in Asian, vegetarian/vegan, Buddhist, and macrobiotic cuisines.

Eagle Pack Pet Foods, Inc. uses ingredients supplied from U.S. based companies with few exceptions. We import Duck meal from Germany, Anchovy & Sardine meal from Mexico, and Lamb meal from Australia. We closely monitor our incoming ingredients. All meat meals are tested by NIR analysis to determine protein, fat, fiber and moisture levels. Grains, such as rice, corn and oatmeal, are tested for mycotoxins. We have good and trusting relationships with our suppliers.

Eagle Pack Pet Foods, Inc. is regulated by the FDA, the State of Indiana, the USDA/APHIS and AAFCO.

Recently there has been an additional concern as a result of a voluntary recall by another manufacturer. The company announced the suspected ingredient is Rice Protein Concentrate that contains Melamine. At this point, the FDA has not commented and the above has not been confirmed.

As with Wheat Gluten, we do not use Rice Protein Concentrate, or as it is also called, Rice Gluten, in any of our Eagle Pack® Super Premium or Holistic Select® Formulas.

If you have fed your pet any of the pet food recalled by other manufacturers, we urge you to take them to the veterinarian and have tests performed. Kidney failure can be a painful and deadly disease, but it is also reversible with early treatment. Many other consumers are opting to stay away from products that contain wheat gluten, as the FDA warns consumers that retailers could still have the recalled product on their shelves.

Further questions can be answered by our Customer Service department: Monday thru Friday, 8am-5pm EST. 1-800-255-5959 or 1-574-259-7834.

Visit www.fda.gov for more details on the pet food recall as they progress.
Rice has no gluten in it. Gluten is present in cereal grains - wheat, barley, oats, etc.
 

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Sue, thank you for posting that. I just started paying attention to the wheat gluten/rice blah blah deal of the last few days, and had started to wonder about the kibble we're feeding Larry. Since it's Eagle Pack, your post went a long way towards putting my mind at ease.
 

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Here is a link to what gluten is and how it is made.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluten

The rice protien is probably made in a similar way but isn't a gluten because the gluten protiens aren't found in rice.
Also Corn Gluten is a common term for protiens extracted from corn but no Gluten is in corn either.

Kelly and Amber
 

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Purina's main page includes a letter to us from the employees... interesting approach I thought...

A Message From The Employees of Nestlé Purina PetCare Company
April 18, 2007

Dear Valued Purina Consumer:

Nothing is more important to Nestlé Purina PetCare Company than the health and well-being of the pets whose nutrition has been entrusted to Purina products by their owners. The loss of a pet or a pet's illness due to pet food contamination is absolutely unacceptable to us, and a tragedy for those involved.

We want to take this opportunity to provide you with some valuable information about the recent limited recall of two Purina products - ALPO® brand Prime Cuts wet dog food and Mighty Dog® brand pouch-packaged dog food - and the possible confusion surrounding wheat gluten as a safe and good ingredient used in pet foods.

Nestlé Purina associates, most of whom are pet owners, feed Purina products. All of us are working diligently and with a total commitment to address and resolve this situation; to respond to concerns of consumers, customers and veterinarians; and to take the necessary actions to protect the health and well-being of the millions of dogs and cats who eat Purina foods.

We want you to know that wheat gluten, in and of itself, is not the reason for the recent recall of ALPO Prime Cuts canned and Mighty Dog pouch products. According to the FDA, the recall was due to a contaminant, subsequently identified as melamine, which was found in specific lots of wheat gluten.

Wheat gluten is a rich natural protein extracted from wheat or wheat flour. Purina has been using wheat gluten in its products for nearly twenty years without incident. In fact, the same quality wheat gluten that is used in pet food products is also used in human foods. Because we believe you might be concerned or get asked about the role of this ingredient as a result of the recall, click here for a summary of the current facts surrounding this issue.

We also want you to know that our already rigorous evaluation and food safety program for our raw materials has been reviewed and enhanced to now detect melamine. Despite the fact that melamine is a completely foreign substance to food and should not be found in wheat gluten, we are now testing every lot of wheat gluten received for the presence of this contaminant. Further, we are implementing additional technology to further screen our pet food ingredients.

We encourage you to review "The Facts about Contamination and the Recent Pet Food Recall", and share it with those you feel may be interested in the information, in order to provide clearer information surrounding the recall, wheat gluten and its important role in the production of our pet foods.

We pledge that Purina is doing everything possible to continue ensuring each ingredient that goes into our products is safe for pets. Please know that nothing is more important to us than protecting the health and wellbeing of the millions of dogs and cats who eat Purina pet foods. We continue to cooperate fully with the FDA during its ongoing investigation and rest assured, we will continue to take the appropriate actions necessary. This is a responsibility all Purina associates take very seriously.

We are confident that consumers can continue to place their trust in Purina products.

For more information and answers to Frequently Asked Questions, please click here.

Sincerely,

The Employees of Nestlé Purina PetCare Company

Updated FAQs – April 19, 2007

Do you use rice protein concentrate in any of your products?

No. Nestlé Purina PetCare Company does not use rice protein concentrate in any of its U.S. or Canadian pet food products.

Do you source any other ingredients from the Chinese supplier of the rice protein concentrate in question?

No.

Where do you source rice used in Purina brand pet foods?

All rice used in Purina brand pet foods is sourced from North America.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for posting the links and letters, you guys. This is all so confusing. :-\
 
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