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Discussion Starter #1
To those of you with multi labs that are different colors do you notice a difference in personality amongst the colors. Of course every dog is different but wasn't sure if the color of the lab makes the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
What about male/female traits. Ok, looking back, the color question is kinda silly, but I swore I read somewhere that some personality traits are seen more in different colors.
 

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On the color thing, I was just talking with someone and said my next lab will be a chocolate and she promptly informed me that all Chocolates were a handful. I told her that I heard the same thing about Blacks and my Boo is such a sweet tho ornery thing. I told her it's like saying all red headed people are short tempered, blonds are dumb etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yeah I know...just curious because I was looking into adopting a black male 5 yr old lab.
 

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nope...although my males are much more into ALWAYS being in my lap ... the girls come and get their loving and then go do their own thing.

i have yellows, a chocolate and a black. have had more blacks in the past. no difference in personality based on color...and laura...my chocolate is not the one that steals food! ;) heehee!

go for it...help that black boy out!
 

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The only (and I mean only) reasonable explanation I've ever heard about the "chocolates are crazy/a handful, etc." is that it can be a bit more difficult to find a really well-bred chocolate. I've been told that a number of years ago, chocolates were really popular and so there was a bit of a rush by unscrupulous "breeders" to have more, so things like temperament and health weren't as well screened. I can perhaps buy that argument.

Of course, I have a poorly bred, crazy chocolate and I love him dearly. I also have a rescue yellow female, and they are very different from one another. Due to color? I doubt it. Gender? Maybe. Just being different dogs? Definitely.

Edited to add, good for you for considering rescue. Go check him out and good luck, I hope it works out!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
then ask alot of questions about THAT particular dog and HIS personality, not what others dogs are like.
Well, duhhhh! I have already done that. I just wanted to do a little more homework on different labs and predisposed behavior. I had a brain fart when I wrote the question, give a girl a break! Geesshhh!
 

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I have heard the rumour regarding the OP, but I don't believe it.
 

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From what I've read on this and other boards over the last few years and from talking with lab owners and experiencing my own labs, I am completely convinced that a lab is only as much of a "handful" as you let him be.

Black, yellow, chocolate, poorly bred, coming from reputable breeder, male, female, small, large.....none of that matters compared to how you handle and treat your lab and the care you give him.
 

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Red heads are NOT short tempered, dammit! ;)
Bwah ha ha ha ha!!!

You know, I've heard a LOT of those misconceptions out there about yellow labs being laid back, chocolates being hyper and blacks being the worst.

I can tell you that my 6.5 year old yellow male is more energetic and always on the go than my 16-month-old black male puppy, who is the most laid back, most calm and gentle baby there is. My SIL's sister has a chocolate male, who may be even more calm than Ollie is.

So, I think it just has to do with each dog's individual personality more than anything.

As far as males vs. females, I've only ever had male dogs and they are both big love-bugs and snugglers. Henry (yellow) follows me everywhere, while Ollie (black) follows SO everywhere.
 

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Black, yellow, chocolate, poorly bred, coming from reputable breeder, male, female, small, large.....none of that matters compared to how you handle and treat your lab and the care you give him.
When do I drop Rhys off?

Genetics, environment and upbringing control temperament.

Sometimes genetics get the best of them though.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Yes you are all right. Thats why I had a brain fart when I typed the first message, it doesn't really matter breed, color, sex etc. it's how you train them.
 

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Yes you are all right. Thats why I had a brain fart when I typed the first message, it doesn't really matter breed, color, sex etc. it's how you train them.
I wouldn't say it is ALL about training either.

Every dog will have a different temperment, even within a breed (though you hope there is a smaller gap in the differences within a breed). For example, there is a different when you have a dog with lots of DRIVE versus one that does not, or one that is more "alpha-y" vs a versy submissive dog. Yes you can train "around" that but it will change the dog none the less. The issue is, temperment is not at all related to color or gender (though there are "general tendacies" there are many who break the mold so I wouldn't rely on it)

Mix that in with environment (not just training, but how busy a household is), exercise routine (my "laid back" dog gets 1.5hrs a day of a mix of running and walking), socialisation during the critical period, etc, and you get what you get.
 
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