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My husband and I were walking our male and female (Lil and Legend) when a chocolate lab charged out of his house at us and came into the street. He came right up to Legend growling with his hackles raised. Lil barked at him as well as Legend. I separated Lil from my husband and Legend in order to break up the "pack." The owner happened to be in the yard after checking the mail and called after his dog who paid him no attention. His dog turned on Lil to get up close and personal by smelling her behind which she wanted no part of. The owner finally got ahold of him and apologized. They are new to our neighborhood, so we didn't know about the lab. He claimed his dog was six years old and just found out today that it had cancer. I felt sorry for him and shared we had a chocolate that contracted cancer, and then I wished him luck. My question is: What to do if a situation like this ever happens again? Did I do the right thing. I did not yell, just pulled Lil away as the dog approached her. Anyone have any suggestions?
 

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My only suggestion would be to put your own dog behind you and stand in front with a dominant stance. You are pack leader, as such it is your responsibility to a) protect your dog and b) to be greeted first by other dogs. You call the shots.

I have made the mistake multiple times when other dogs approach us, allowing Morgan out front to greet first and sniff and such. Some of these meetings have not gone well and as a result, Morgan gets angry when other dogs show him dominance. The minute I started doing the above, he dialed it back a little.

Good luck with it
 

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Agree with rockwater.

Also, I think you said something about pulling Lil back from the aggressive dog? Believe me, I know this is totally reflex and I have to remind myself constantly not to do it, but when you tighten up on the leash in these situations it can sometimes increase agitation/aggression in the leashed dog.

Angus has been jumped before when he was on leash and the other dog was not. As a result, he really, really does not like other dogs to come running up to him when he's leashed. If you tighten up in any way, it seems to send the message to him that this is indeed dangerous and he should be worried. Or perhaps he feels further confined and therefore more vulnerable. Probably the latter. :(

I know this dog came out of nowhere. I hate it when that happens. When we are walking the dogs I am constantly scanning the environment for off-leash dogs that could come running up. If I see one I try to avoid it if possible, by switching directions or cutting them a wide berth. If they are unavoidable, I will put my dog (whichever I am walking) on the opposite side of me than the unleashed dog. If you can keep yourself as a barrier in between, this often goes a long way towards avoiding confrontation. Especially if you can block any eye contact...if they are in a heel position, your body will block their vision.

So sorry this happened. I know how scary it can be. :-\
 

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We've been charged a handful of times walking in our neighborhood, each time I was successful when I stepped in front of Ty...bowed out and started walking towards the charging dog while making noises like "HEY!" or "GET OUTA HERE!" or something.

Of course this may not work on a dog thats determined to kill...these dogs charging us were probably a little unsure about themselves.
 

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If another unleashed dog comes up to mine while on a leash, i in fact drop the leash, and let them do their thing naturally. By pulling back, and letting your dog raise up in the air, paws scratching forward, it actually makes your dog appear more aggressive than can be, and can exacerbate a bad situation.

I obviously stay right there ready to dole out a good dose of alpha correction (and protection) should if necessary though... :police:

In fact Chuy was recently rapidly approached by a little, mean, nuisance of a dog that then proceeded to bite down on his doggie backpack, but a firm dominant, step towards him and a verbal correction got him to immediately back off.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, all, for the great advice. I have been out of town and unable to reach the forum. Checking the site was the first thing I did upon returning this afternoon. I'll cetainly do as advised next time. :)
 
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