Just Labradors banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,955 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Astilbe, Russian sage, hostas and azaleas.

My astilbe had JUST started taking off - one day they weren't there and the next POOF! They had grown exponentially every day since then. Now though, they're all shriveled.

Russian sage and hostas had just started to become noticable and now look wilty, for lack of a better word.

And just a few days before the cold moved in, I had noticed the beginnings of the buds on my azalea.

So, is everything lost for this year? Or will it all bounce back once it gets warmer again? (I'm really hoping for the latter.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,961 Posts
I'm not sure how the cold affects them. Like with my hostas... I took Alexa's Spiderman sofa and covered it up.

BWAAAHAHAAA HAAAAA..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,955 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I"m so stupid. I didn't cover anything up.

And it was so exciting going outside every day seeing how much the stuff had grown. :-[
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
638 Posts
For what it's worth...

If you had a freeze (assume you did from your post), your sage and hostas should come back, no problem. Perennials will usually just lose their leaves, and then start over. The azaleas, also perennials, should re-gain leaves, but I think the blooms are toast for this year (though not positive -- I've had azaleas occasionally bloom in the fall!). I don't konw what astilbe is -- but as a rule of thumb, if it is annual and wilting, it's probably toast. If it is perennial, it should come back.

Steve
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,586 Posts
I'm going to vote for "bounces back."

I just got up and looked outside and my Japanese Maple's leaves are totally shriveled. :eek:

I am not going to worry about perennials, bushes, etc. until after it has warmed up for a few days. We have Aucubas (a bush) planted on one side of our foundation. They are really for one zone warmer than here, but I loved them, and lo and behold, every year they make it. But every year when it gets really cold, the leaves turn VERY dark and shrivel. Then, after it warms back up for a few days, they're fine.

So, we'lll see. I think it might get a lot of perennial/tree BLOOMS, but the actual plant should be OK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,586 Posts
Astilbe is perennial, so it should be fine :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,336 Posts
The only one I would worry about would be the Russian Sage. All the others, I have in my gardens, and living in Maine, one can often find the temperature to plummet late into the season. The only reason I think you might have problems with the sage is that I have tried to plant one two or three times, with no luck in having it return the following year. I think that they might not be as resistant to cold.

But, what do I know?? ;) Hopefully, they will all be fine! I am sure Cam or lablover will be able to give you a more definitive answer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,586 Posts
Oh boy. I just checked out my crepe myrtles. They had sprouted a lot of new growth in the past week (leaves, not blooms). The leaves look VERY dark and like they might be crispy. I think those may not recover and have to start over. Haven't gone out and touched them yet, but from here they look pretty bad. ::)

We had several weeks of 80's here, and I think it coaxed out a lot of things that don't normally come out so soon. I know crepes are always one of the last things to leaf out, and I thought last week, "Wow, that seems early for them..."

We covered our irises, which are in full, glorious bloom at the moment, so those should hopefully be OK. The tulips are toast...I let them go because the 80 degree temps had sort of fried them anyway. :-\
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,586 Posts
I don't have any Russian sage either, but found this:

The 3- to 4-foot-tall, shrubby perennial is both cold-hardy (Sunset Western Garden Book climate zones 2 and 3) and drought-tolerant.
Sounds like it should be fine. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,336 Posts
Hardy to zones 2 and 3?? LOL! I really must be doing something wrong!

I hope everything is fine for both of you. Waiting for spring flowers is what gets me through the winter!

Happy Gardening!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,586 Posts
:D Anne, I have never been able to do anything with it either! I think it wants a lot more sun than I can give it. :-\
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,512 Posts
You should be fine. Perennials are used to crazy spring weather. My earliest blooming azalea has some flowers on it already and it was covered in snow yesterday. The only plants which would be affected would be annuals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,788 Posts
Looks like both my Rose of Sharon and my spirea didn't make it through their first winter... poor little sticks...

can't wait for the irises and the tulips to bloom.. only a few survived the squirrel-raids.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,170 Posts
Your plants should all be fine Melissa. You may loose flower buds on your azalea, but as someone said, you may get a later flowering. Hard to say. I know I sometimes get two bloomings on my Rhodos, one in spring and one in late summer. All of your plants are pretty hardy, so they should come around.

Kaytris, don't give up on your Rose of Sharon, it may just need more time to show any fresh buds. If I recall correctly, they can be late to bloom.

If you have plants that just barely suits your particular zone, then it is usually best to insulate it during winter. For some, a layer of mulch is all that is needed, for others you'll need to wrap in burlap. Some may even need a layer of straw for added insulation before wrapping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,928 Posts
My crepe myrtles look fried (dark and wilty and it was all baby new growth). I think whatever buds that were left on the azaleas are toast. Hostas and other perenials look okay.........
 
D

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Anne said:
The only one I would worry about would be the Russian Sage. All the others, I have in my gardens, and living in Maine, one can often find the temperature to plummet late into the season. The only reason I think you might have problems with the sage is that I have tried to plant one two or three times, with no luck in having it return the following year. I think that they might not be as resistant to cold.

But, what do I know?? ;) Hopefully, they will all be fine! I am sure Cam or lablover will be able to give you a more definitive answer.
I have Russian Sage in NJ and it winters over well. Most perennials will do OK with a late frost. The foliage may die back but the plant should push new growth up. The azaleas may not bloom this year though. Magnolias in my neighborhood are 50/50 for making through this cold snap. They all are heavy with buds and it is really cold out. They will probably all just drop off without blooming. Bummer!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,174 Posts
Here is an email that I got from Purdue last Friday:

April 5, 2007
Freeze Damage to Plants
This spring's unseasonably warm weather in late March through April 3 encouraged many trees and shrubs to leaf out earlier than normal. Newly emerged growth is quite succulent and susceptible to damage from strong winds and below freezing temperatures.

Strong winds yesterday caused foliage and flowers of some plants to wilt. This morning, at home and on the way to work, I saw frozen foliage and flowers of daffodils, magnolias, iris (foliage), and tree lilac (foliage). I know there’s a lot more. And, we only had an overnight low of 29 degrees, which will likely be the “warmest” night until early next week.

With the predicted lows of around 20 degrees or colder the next few nights, emerging growth on some trees and shrubs will be damaged or destroyed. Based on past experience, damage will be severe on Japanese maple (Acer palmatum), yellowwood (Cladrastis kentukea), hydrangeas (Hydrangea spp.), and magnolias (Magnolia spp.). The “smart” trees are the ones stay dormant longer – the oaks, ash, birch, walnut, hickories, and evergreens. The lush growth on many perennials will also be damaged or destroyed. Damage will be especially severe on astilbes (Astilbe spp.), ferns, hostas (Hosta spp.), and other numerous other perennials. I spent some time getting my face wind burned late yesterday afternoon covering our two rows of strawberries, emerging hostas and some other perennials with straw.

A few people may have been timely enough with lawn seeding that new seedlings have already emerged. I talked with Zac Reicher, Purdue Turfgrass Specialist, yesterday and he said he was more concerned about potential damage to the new grass seedlings from the wind, than the cold temperatures. He suggested applying more straw mulch over new grass seedings, if it is in an area that the wind doesn’t just blow it off.

Symptoms
Symptoms of freeze damage include shriveling and browning or blackening of damaged tissue. Damaged growth often becomes limp. Eventually, damaged or destroyed leaves may drop from the tree or shrub.

Prognosis
Fortunately, trees and shrubs have the ability to leaf out again if the initial growth is damaged or destroyed. Healthy, well established trees and shrubs should not be greatly impacted and will produce additional growth within a few weeks. Trees and shrubs planted within the past 5 years may benefit from an application of fertilizer. Give them some nitrogen when it warms up. I like to apply urea (46-0-0) on trees and shrubs. If you can’t find urea, any other high nitrogen fertilizer is just as good. A typical lawn fertilizer, something like 23-4-8, is good.

The prognosis for freeze-damaged perennials is also good. While the freezing temperatures should damage the perennial’s foliage, their crowns and roots should not harmed. Damaged perennials will send up new growth within a few weeks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,788 Posts
kaisdad said:
.

Kaytris, don't give up on your Rose of Sharon, it may just need more time to show any fresh buds. If I recall correctly, they can be late to bloom.
Yeah, they don't bloom till august/september, so I'll leave it for the time being.. I have really ambitious plans for the front yard (hope to tear up all the grass and make the whole yard a perennial garden, with ornamental grasses and ground cover.. I loathe plain ordinary grass lawns) so if the sharon doesn't recover, that's okay... I'll try again later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,170 Posts
kaytris said:
kaisdad said:
.

Kaytris, don't give up on your Rose of Sharon, it may just need more time to show any fresh buds. If I recall correctly, they can be late to bloom.
Yeah, they don't bloom till august/september, so I'll leave it for the time being.. I have really ambitious plans for the front yard (hope to tear up all the grass and make the whole yard a perennial garden, with ornamental grasses and ground cover.. I loathe plain ordinary grass lawns) so if the sharon doesn't recover, that's okay... I'll try again later.

I hope you'll post pictures of your progress! I also loathe lawns. They are the biggest waste of energy and water there is. When I rebuild my house, I'll be starting my landscaping from scratch and will be xeriscaping my yard. Over the past few years, I've reclaimed patches of lawn for perennials. Right now I love walking around my yard and looking at what's coming up!
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top