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I was watching Dogs 101 tonight and it kind of made me mad how they talk about certain dog breeds and the best "environment" for them.

I don't remember what they said for Labs, but for a lot of dogs they say that certain breeds need a lot of room to run and wouldn't do well in an apartment. I don't really understand that.. since I live in an apartment with two dogs and two cats and we are fine. We have a billion toys inside, so we are able to play a lot in here and practice agility in the dining room, but mostly, we're outside a lot.

I don't have a "yard" that's fenced in, but we are outside on walks/runs, playing fetch, swimming, etc and they are perfectly adapted to my "apartment" life.

I guess I just feel like they are sometimes giving people the wrong idea when they say which dogs do well in certain environments. :doh: :frown:
 

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i agree... i actually feel that when i lived in an apt with apple she was walked way more being that i didn't have the means to just open the back door and have her do her own thing.

Abbey and Kolby would never even notice if you lived in a house.. looking at all your pics you guys are spunky and always swimming, running on green open field grass... their lives are made.
 

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Not all apartments are huge. I think of the apartment my sister has, small living room, small kitchen, her kitchen table is actually in the living room, one bath, 1 bedroom. I can't imagine a Labrador living in there. It is her and her Fiance', and their Pug. They are tripping over each other.

-Shannon
 

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My Aunt lived in apartments in NYC for at least 10 years. During that time, she had Great Danes & Weimaraners. It never did them any harm. :smile:
 

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I think partly the reason for not recommending a particular breed for an apartment may be due to more than space issues. Some breeds are very vocal, and a barking dog can soon become a nuisance when living that close to your neighbors. Another thing might be the apartment lifestyle. If the average apartment dweller is say, a college student, with erratic hours and limited time, then a breed that requires more exercise might be a problem.

I had a dog while I was in college, and he went everywhere with me. I also knew many people who should have never got a pet rock, let alone a dog.
 

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I hear you. BUT I admit it is a bigger commitment with an apt (i.e. the small stuff like getting a dog to pee invovles gettig dressed and going out on leash rather than opening the door) but I find alot of apt dogs (I live in the city so I see many) are in good shape and very well socialized (to both people, dogs and sites/sounds). Having a fenced yard doesn't excuse the exercise either (most dogs do not exercise themselves in a back yard) but makes finding a space for exercise easier! :)

Not all apartments are huge. I think of the apartment my sister has, small living room, small kitchen, her kitchen table is actually in the living room, one bath, 1 bedroom. I can't imagine a Labrador living in there. It is her and her Fiance', and their Pug. They are tripping over each other.

-Shannon
I live in a 1 bedroom and have my big lab and a foster often (another large breed, currently another lab). Labs are at your feet ANYWAY so to me it makes no difference. My parents have a normal size house but the family dog always has to be near my dad so size doesn't matter, he is still underfoot. I can see your point of view and it may depend on the dog but I don't understand why big dogs need a big house. just me.

I find the hardest part the washroom breaks (especially when they have bowel problems and need to go out in the middle of the night) and issues with getting a puppy (need to get out in public before all the shots are done). oh and when I have dog agressive fosters making the dog park a no-no (still very doable just have to find places for exercise!) But I also don't have a car so I am very limited LOL!

TOTALLY agree about it being much harder with breeds that are known to be more vocal but...you know alot of SMALLER dogs are known to be more vocal so I don't kow about that. probably more dog specific than breed specific - heck see my post about my foster barking!

More breeders and rescues are willing to hear you out these days even if you are in an apt. One has more talking and proving to do than when you have a yard but if you prove you are aware and willing to put in the work more are willing to adopt to you (though some still have a fenced yard policy)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well I understand the barking thing.. but I guess the "little" dogs that tend to be more vocal, you can kind of guess that going in.

I know on some of the large breeds they say they have to have all this land to run on.. which honestly, my dogs don't have, but I don't think they are missing out. I'm able to take them to parks to swim and run around, not necessarily off-leash, but still.

And the fence requirement is understandable, but I still think it's stupid that some of them make no exceptions, ever. Bums me out that those dogs are missing out on good homes sometimes!
 

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I lived in small apartments with my lab and boyfriend for the first 6 years of my Ace's life and it was great. While it was frustrating to deal with the midnight potty breaks in the middle of a blizzard, I also think that the necessity of always walking the dog brought us closer. Now that we have land with a doggy door setup, I don't feel like I'm as attuned to Ace's movements like I used to be. Living in a small apartment is like living in a crate - everyone (dogs and people) are in a safe, quiet, confined spot where you eat and sleep. You go outside to play.
 

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Dogs do great no matter where they live... as long as they are loved and cared for...I think you got that covered Justine:)
 

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100% agree with Tanya. I know tons of dog owners who live in large houses and their dogs are totally stir-crazy because they are never (or hardly ever) walked or even taken off property period, and I'm sorry, but a big house and fenced yard does not a happy dog make. Attention and exercise are the keys here, and a big house and yard don't provide for those.

I have lived in a TINY apartment with Peanut and two cats, and lived in a small townhouse with both dogs, and I actually liked that much better than our current digs, which is a large (4 bedroom) house with a big backyard. Taking them out for a pee is a pain because the yard is off a big deck, so I have to go all the way out with them, can't just stand at the door and watch. There are more places for the hair to collect, and more area for me to worry about dog proofing. It's also suburbia galore over here, so the parks are less accessible.

It'll probably be a little while, but I can't wait to get back to apartment living. :p
 

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"Dogs do great no matter where they live... as long as they are loved and cared for...I think you got that covered Justine"

I totally agree with this. Regardless of where dogs are living, it's the owner who makes a difference and makes is possible.
 

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I echo what Lisa said above. I really think it is about the amount of time you spend with your dog and the love and attention given to them that makes a great dog. Justine, your Abbey and Kolby are "living the life" with you. I don't think they could be happier or more content with your living arrangements. Those shows speak in broad generalizations without taking individual situations into account. It is just another opinion and you know what we always tell each other. Take the good and useful info and "flush" the rest. :smile:
 

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Years ago we lived in military housing which were small apartment sized places and we actually had a Saint Bernard and a dachshund. They both did wonderful. Everyday she was walked and taken to the fenced in ball field to play. She was healthy and happy and a great dog. I find I trip over the dogs more now in a larger home because they tend to follow me more. I am sure that in the smaller environment they could pretty much see me where ever I was but now in a bigger house they have to follow to make sure I am not escaping. Still trying to convince them that when I go to the bathroom that the only way out is a small window and my butt won't fit through it...LOL
 

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I have no problem with people who live in apartments having larger dogs like Labs.
Personally, there was no way I was going to get a dog when I lived in my apartment. I waited until I had a large house with alot of land. I just felt it was the kind of life I wanted to give my labs.
But, before you think it-we do not have a fenced yard, so I am not one of those people that stands at the door and lets my girls out. I have to go out with them every time to potty (very rural area, lots of wildlife and no fences). I also take my girls to the park to go swimming and hiking every single day-rain, snow, hot or cold. No excuses.
For me, it was just a personal choice. I wanted to wait until I had a house and land to get my dogs. I know plenty of people that have houses and land-and big, fat, lazy labs.
 

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Emma moved from a house with two floors and a little garden to me in my apartment on second floor with a balcony when she was almost 3. What is a house and garden if you need to lay down in a corner all day anyway? She always has had more freedom in my apartment than in the house she came from. So moving from a house to apartment was a dream coming true for Emma. I don't exercise inside and neither does my dog. Outside is a lot of space and that's what's important.
 

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Usually Dogs 101 explains why they feel dogs would do best in certain environments; and normally it has to do with how active the breed (generally speaking) is inside. Bauer is very inactive inside, and would do fine in an apartment. Honestly, Bauer and I could live in a closet because he is never farther away from me than that anyway. My French Bulldog who is 5 (3 years older than Bauer) is much more active inside, and even though she weighs 60+ pounds less than Bauer . . . I wouldn't want to live in an apartment with her (unless we were on the bottom floor). Neither of the dogs are barkers, but Bauer is just quieter in everything that he does (he walks quieter, he gets up and down from the furniture quieter. Lucy almost always runs from room to room, and does this noisy jumping thing when she plays with her toys; she would drive everyone around us crazy.
 

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I guess if you have the dedication and time to correctly exercise your dog, then every dog could adapt well. The problem is that most people probably don´t have this dedication and hence the recomendations. I used to rent a small house before and now that I have a nice yard, Misha and Homer really enjoy it and boy, do they make use of their yard. On the contrary, now that they also have the large garage to stay when I´m not at home, I don´t think they "enjoy" the extra space and just laze around waiting for me to come back.

A Great Dane is actually a dog you could keep in an apartment provided you don´t care it will knock things down all the time with their "whip" tails. They are actually very calm dogs once exercised. A Weimaraner or any hunting breed I would never dare to keep in an apartment no matter how much exercise they get, they are just too hyper and nervous. A friend has a German Pointer and oh boy, it does take us a good 3 hours mountain biking and Pepper still has a lot of fuel to burn... but she´s an amazing dog, very athletic and agile, perfect company for mountain biking. During the week she gives my friend a very hard time in his house
 
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