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I don't make beer...... just beer whiz.
 

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My brother makes his own with some kind of kit, not sure which one. It tastes like crap but nobody ever tells him that.
 

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It's really easy to do. Sanatizing all of the equipment is essential however. Do not skip any cleaning step in the process. Google "Beer Making" and you will find all of the advice you can handle.
 

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DH did it once- used some kit, I think he learned real quick that he would rather not wait for the beer, especially when it wasn't nearly as good and actually pretty bad, then many of the micro brews he can purchase;) My suggestion for the man cave, is just buy a kegerator, and forget making the darn stuff!!
 

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SU got a "kit" from a friend about 3 years ago - he is still planning on making it and we have hundreds of empty beer bottles in the garage waiting to be filled. I have suggested that he might need to get a new "kit" because the ingredients might be a little old. He doens't believe me, but then, what do I know?
 

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DH did it once- used some kit, I think he learned real quick that he would rather not wait for the beer, especially when it wasn't nearly as good and actually pretty bad, then many of the micro brews he can purchase;) My suggestion for the man cave, is just buy a kegerator, and forget making the darn stuff!!
Yeah, I tried it once and the product definitely wasn't worth the time or money. I can see where if you had the time it could turn into a fun hobby and eventually you could probably produce a pretty good quality beer, but I'm lazy. I'd rather just go to the grocery or liquor store.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My brother makes his own with some kind of kit, not sure which one. It tastes like crap but nobody ever tells him that.
LOL!

I don't make beer...... just beer whiz.
Had to look that up - now I wish I hadnt. :biggrin1:

DH did it once- used some kit, I think he learned real quick that he would rather not wait for the beer, especially when it wasn't nearly as good and actually pretty bad, then many of the micro brews he can purchase My suggestion for the man cave, is just buy a kegerator, and forget making the darn stuff!!
Kegerators are great! I've seen some really good ones. I am sure we'll be drinking beer whilst making our own brew!! My friend has his own construction company and he bought this house which he has completely renovated. Now his wife is happy with all the things she wanted he can focus on the most important part - man cave! I think he has big ideas now I mentioned brewing beer. I can only imagine what will come out of that basement once we start brewing!! :shocked: The best part is that his wife caught wind of our plans and I get the blame. "look what you've started" "this place will smell like a brewery." :yell::biggrin1:

It's really easy to do. Sanatizing all of the equipment is essential however. Do not skip any cleaning step in the process. Google "Beer Making" and you will find all of the advice you can handle.
Thanks! I found a good home brewing website. I think the sanatizing is extremely important like you say.

SU got a "kit" from a friend about 3 years ago - he is still planning on making it and we have hundreds of empty beer bottles in the garage waiting to be filled. I have suggested that he might need to get a new "kit" because the ingredients might be a little old. He doens't believe me, but then, what do I know?
That brings a whole new meaning to aged beer!!

Yeah, I tried it once and the product definitely wasn't worth the time or money. I can see where if you had the time it could turn into a fun hobby and eventually you could probably produce a pretty good quality beer, but I'm lazy. I'd rather just go to the grocery or liquor store.
I agree, it definitely takes some time and mastering the right amounts fermenting etc. I think I will pass on the "Mr Beer" kits because they seem way to basic. I know some one who makes pretty good tasting beer from it but it took him loads of time and experimenting. I am looking at a home brewing website that is a little more advanced but also good for beginners. I think we'll either get bored with it OR it will become a hobby! In the meantime will stock up with beer from the store!
 

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In the meantime will stock up with beer from the store!
Definitely. I found it takes about three cases of store beer to get you through making 5 gallons of home brew.:biggrin1:
I do think that most bad home brew results from contamination during the process. Go with the malt extract and pellet hops to simplify things to start. Then you can get into making your own ingredients from scratch.
A basic "kit" may provide you with all of the equipment you need, a couple of mixing/fermentation buckets with lids and one way venting valve, siphon tubes, etc. A hydrometer is essential to know when it's completed fermentation and ready to bottle. Bottle too early and ka-balooey. Right before bottling you add in a precise amount of sugar to create the CO2 in the bottle. This will also create a bit of "sludge" at the bottom of each bottle as a result of the additional fermentation so you have to carefully pour the finished product out of the bottle slowly into a glass and leave the last bit of cloudy mess in the bottom of the bottle. The cloudy beer won't hurt you, it's just not clear.
Most home brews are darker ales produced by warm fermentation which is easier to do. Lagers and pilsners are lighter in color and taste but require a much more difficult cold fermentation process.
Why?:

Warm fermenting
Main article: Ale
Ale yeasts ferment at warmer temperatures between 15–20 °C (59–68 °F), and occasionally as high as 24 °C (75 °F). Pure ale yeasts form a foam on the surface of the fermenting beer, because of this they are often referred to as top-fermenting yeast—though there are some British ale yeast strains that settle at the bottom. Ales are generally ready to drink within three weeks after the beginning of fermentation, however, some styles benefit from additional aging for several months or years. Ales range in color from very pale to an opaque black. England is best known for its variety of ales. Ale yeasts can be harvested from the primary fermenter, and stored in the refrigerator or freezer.

Cool fermenting
Main article: Lager
While the nature of yeast was not fully understood until Emil Hansen of the Carlsberg brewery in Denmark isolated a single yeast cell in the 1800s, brewers in Bavaria had for centuries been selecting these cold-fermenting lager yeasts by storing ("lagern") their beers in cold alpine caves. The process of natural selection meant that the wild yeasts that were most cold tolerant would be the ones that would remain actively fermenting in the beer that was stored in the caves. Some of these Bavarian yeasts were brought back to the Carlsberg brewery around the time that Hansen did his famous work.

Traditionally, ales and lagers have been differentiated as being either a top fermentor or bottom fermentor, respectively. The main difference between the two is lager yeast's ability to process raffinose. Raffinose is a trisaccharide composed of galactose, fructose, and glucose.

Lager yeast tends to collect at the bottom of the fermenter and is often referred to as bottom-fermenting yeast. Lager is fermented at much lower temperatures, around 10 °C (50 °F), compared to typical ale fermentation temperatures of 18 °C (64 °F). It is then stored for 30 days or longer close to freezing point. During storage, the beer mellows and flavours become smoother. Sulfur components developed during fermentation dissipate. The popularity of lager was a major factor that led to the rapid introduction of refrigeration in the early 1900s.

Today, lagers represent the vast majority of beers produced, the most famous being a light lager called Pilsner which originated in Pilsen, Czech Republic (Plzeň in Czech).
 

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My dad and his neighbor make their own wine. They went in on all the supplies and make it out in the neighbors barn. First batch, hand-picked elderberries. Delicious. Second batch, grapes. Was okay, nothing special. Third batch, wild blackberries. Really was looking forward to that one. It was finished and they never got around to sweetening and bottling it. So, it sat and sat and sat....

It's basically moonshine. Can't get too close, stuff'll singe your nosehairs.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Definitely. I found it takes about three cases of store beer to get you through making 5 gallons of home brew.:biggrin1:
I do think that most bad home brew results from contamination during the process. Go with the malt extract and pellet hops to simplify things to start. Then you can get into making your own ingredients from scratch.
A basic "kit" may provide you with all of the equipment you need, a couple of mixing/fermentation buckets with lids and one way venting valve, siphon tubes, etc. A hydrometer is essential to know when it's completed fermentation and ready to bottle. Bottle too early and ka-balooey. Right before bottling you add in a precise amount of sugar to create the CO2 in the bottle. This will also create a bit of "sludge" at the bottom of each bottle as a result of the additional fermentation so you have to carefully pour the finished product out of the bottle slowly into a glass and leave the last bit of cloudy mess in the bottom of the bottle. The cloudy beer won't hurt you, it's just not clear.
Most home brews are darker ales produced by warm fermentation which is easier to do. Lagers and pilsners are lighter in color and taste but require a much more difficult cold fermentation process.
Why?
Great advice! Thank you. I laughed at the bit about three cases of store beer to get you through making 5 gallons of home brew!!

What kind of beer do you make/have you made?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
My dad and his neighbor make their own wine. They went in on all the supplies and make it out in the neighbors barn. First batch, hand-picked elderberries. Delicious. Second batch, grapes. Was okay, nothing special. Third batch, wild blackberries. Really was looking forward to that one. It was finished and they never got around to sweetening and bottling it. So, it sat and sat and sat....

It's basically moonshine. Can't get too close, stuff'll singe your nosehairs.
:biggrin1: LOL at singed nose hairs!!

I seem to remember my parents making elderberry wine. We had an elderberry bush in the back yard and big bottles with pipes everywhere!
 

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What kind of beer do you make/have you made?
Years ago I tried to make a cold fermented Pilsner as I had an extra refrigerator to keep it cold. It was suppose to ferment for three months but I kept tasting it along the way and only ended up with a couple of bottles at the end.:biggrin1:
I have switched to making warm fermenting ale because it's much easier and quicker. Haven't done a batch in a while but it will be my advocation once I retire in a year or so.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Years ago I tried to make a cold fermented Pilsner as I had an extra refrigerator to keep it cold. It was suppose to ferment for three months but I kept tasting it along the way and only ended up with a couple of bottles at the end.:biggrin1:
I have switched to making warm fermenting ale because it's much easier and quicker. Haven't done a batch in a while but it will be my advocation once I retire in a year or so.
Thats interesting the cold vs hot fermenting ales.

I can imagine the wait for the cold fermented pilsner must be torture!
 

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What kind of beer does he make T?

How is the blog page coming along?
He's made a few different types. The one he makes most now (biggest crowd pleaser) is an India pale ale that you'd swear came from a brewery.

My still nameless blog is a work in progress. Figuring out how it works to get it to look the way I want it. I have a LOT of work ahead of me =)
Thank you for asking!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
He's made a few different types. The one he makes most now (biggest crowd pleaser) is an India pale ale that you'd swear came from a brewery.

My still nameless blog is a work in progress. Figuring out how it works to get it to look the way I want it. I have a LOT of work ahead of me =)
Thank you for asking!
Glad to hear the blog is coming along. I am sure it will take some time but all the hard work will be worth it!

Is there a website your husband gets his equipment/ingredients from OR does he go to a store? I've been looking at a couple of online sites but not sure who I will buy from yet.
 
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