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I agree Colin. I don't get horse people that can buy and sell their animals without blinking an eye.

I do understand that horses cost a lot and sometimes, especially in this ecomony, and people need to sell them. Still, for the most part, they seem so callous when they do. That's how I got Toby...the guy lost his job and couldn't afford him anymore. He seemed upset about it, but sometimes I wonder.

Not remarking on this ad at all, which I found hysterical.
 

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I think in the equestrian world, most of the selling goes on among the competitive crowd. When a rider outgrows a po, either in size or ability, and they need a new horse to compete with, well, as laura said, they are very expensive to keep. Most competitors sell their horses to people who can compete with them for a few years. I am sure many of them love their animals as pets, and it must be tremendously hard to let one go, but if it is your sport, and you can't afford two... well...
 

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I agree Colin. I've never had my own but have been a catch-rider and trainer for years, and I get attached to every one before they're sold out from under me. :( Sucks, but better than not riding/being around horses at all.

That ad is hilarious! Is it real? I know people who would buy that pony in a heartbeat, horrible vices and all. :rolleyes:
 

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I have known some competitors who, for them, the horse is simply a vehicle and a means to a ribbon or a prize. They sell or trade their horses easier than we do cars. :( That always baffled me. I could not understand how they didn't become attached to the animals.
 

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As Bonnie tells me on a regular basis, she is a horse owner, not a horse person. She could sell Dot and Gracie tomorrow if needed. Just last fall, she was wanting to give them to me for free because they might be moving out of state. She cares for them, but not to extent that I do, which might be a better way to be. *shrugs*
 

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As Bonnie tells me on a regular basis, she is a horse owner, not a horse person. She could sell Dot and Gracie tomorrow if needed. Just last fall, she was wanting to give them to me for free because they might be moving out of state. She cares for them, but not to extent that I do, which might be a better way to be. *shrugs*
Well, you open yourself up to less heartaches that way, but you also miss out on so much. Personally, I'll take the heartaches along with the love and pure enjoyment I get!
 

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My cousins are quite competitive in quarterhorses, and they usually train and show a horse until 4 or 5 years old before selling it. They miss them, but they also see the joy that those horses can bring their next owners (usually young girls). I know when I was riding and working sale horses that made it easier for me too.

That being said, Paul is my horse for life - he took care of me so many times when I was younger and doing stupid stuff - he deserves his current life of luxury :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
I have several horses over the years. To me they are different than dogs. I love my horses, but I love(d) my dogs more. Cost is a definite factor. But, I really don't how it is any difference in giving the horse a new home and breeding and selling dogs.
 

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I thought people thought of their horses like we do our dogs, except they can't sleep on the bed!

Some of us do! :D I would never sell Sunny or Pinkie unless it was ABSOLUTELY necessary. However, I TRY very hard NOT to get attached to the foals. (That was my mistake with Pinkie. I claimed her the moment she was foaled.) I KNOW they are to be sold on. Unfortunately, if a mare or stallion doesn't produce what we are looking for, they will be sold on, too. So far, though, we've only sold one stallion (too tall) and several mares that were either too tall or we just didn't mesh with their attitude. And two that delighted in making holes in the fence and visiting the neighbors. :rolleyes:

We do have a couple of old-timers that will stay forever- our 15YO gelding Dunny has earned his retirement. And once Cheyenne is done with making nice foals for us she'll become a pasture puff.
 
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