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Discussion Starter #1
Bailey is getting very aggressive with me and I don't know what to do. She was never aggressive until the last couple days. She has been running around the house and if I am on the couch she will jump, put her paws on the couch and growl, bark and bite at my legs.

Walking the past couple days has been rough. I had training with her and she has been doing so well for months heeling and walking with a loose leash. These past couple days she has been jumping up on me while walking and jumping to bite the leash. I hold the leash at the end with my right hand and then my left hand is holding the leash closer to her body.

I just came in from a painful walk and started crying because I don't know what to do about this sudden aggression. I was sitting on the couch very upset and Bailey comes, sits next to me while on the floor, and puts her paw on my lap and looks at me like "I'm sorry, don't be sad."

She is 9 months...so is this a stage?

I am a teacher so I was off for 2 weeks and then just went back to work on Monday...could this have anything to do with it?

I love Bailey and she has been the perfect dog, but what do I do about this aggressive behavior? I have been so frustrated over the past few days!
 

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What kind of growling is it?

To me it sounds like she has 9 month old lab puppy syndrome. Keep on top of her and don't allow her to get away with it. If I'm not watching Dozer will bite (pinch) the back of my legs when I'm doing dishes to get my attention and then he does these deep terrible sounding barks and unless corrected he breaks out into a butt tuck in which he tries to bite me on each pass. He is testing me, big time, right now.

Cybil, my other lab, went through a very similar stage, which is the only reason when Dozer started being a jackass I didn't panic.
 

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I wouldn't panic..sound typical to me. My Gracie still is not that good on the leash. Sometimes she is pretty good other times she behaves like Bailey. I take part of the blame because I know that everything I learned w training requires consistency and sometimes I lack in that dept. Gracie ( 12 months old) was also very mouthy, she still is...but it is def improving. I am sure Bailey will grow into a fine loving dog:)
 

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Hang in there. It sounds like the "teenage phase" and you should get through this. I suspect she's testing you - and her limits. So now is the time to make sure she understands NILF (Nothing In Life Is Free). Don't punish her harshly, but do correct, and do let her know what is OK and what is not. Also, now may be the best time to start making her earn every reward: and train, train, train. She may need as much or more mental stimulation as physical.

Please understand, I'm not suggesting that you don't train or make her behave. But it sounds like she's pushing it hard so you need to up the ante. Sit before meals. Sit before going out the door. Walk nicely on leash or shortened walk. And reward every time she does it right. And if the bite is hard enough to really hurt, you could try the pinch muzzle grab where you wrap a lip around her own teeth and squeeze just enough that she "bites" herself (there are a lot of people here who will disagree with me on that, but it did work for Toby's mouthiness when nothing else did).

But if it's true agression and not just acting out, you should probably have her checked at the vet to make sure there's nothing physical behind the change in behavior.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you!

Labradorable-what you said about Dozer is exactly what Bailey does...I started calling it the "Bailey Blitz" as she gets this sudden burst of energy and runs and tries to bite me everytime she passes as she barks/growls. She has been doing this for a couple weeks. If I understand this is what Dozer does also? They must be similiar because they are pretty much the same age.

I was told if her tail is wagging then it's not true aggression and her tail is wagging full force as she does this. Is this a true statement?

Of course right now she is sitting on my feet as I am on the computer being the perfect angel. She is great most of the time and I am hoping this is just a phase.
 

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What kind of growling is it?

To me it sounds like she has 9 month old lab puppy syndrome. Keep on top of her and don't allow her to get away with it. If I'm not watching Dozer will bite (pinch) the back of my legs when I'm doing dishes to get my attention and then he does these deep terrible sounding barks and unless corrected he breaks out into a butt tuck in which he tries to bite me on each pass. He is testing me, big time, right now.

Cybil, my other lab, went through a very similar stage, which is the only reason when Dozer started being a jackass I didn't panic.
Gracie does the but tucking, tag and nip my hand thing when I go to put her leash on sometimes...my neighbors think she is a crazy dog:)
 

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Just sounds like she has a lot of pent-up puppy energy to burn off. Give her more exercise. Mine get about 45 minutes of hard play in the field each morning, they get back up to the house and literally collapse and sleep most of the rest of the day ;)
 

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Teddy was adopted at 8 months. He was very mouthy. Squealing loudly helped. Pushing a toy into his mouth helped. Now at the age of 3 he will run and grab a toy when I come home! He is still very rambunctious, though. He will still growl and bark at me when he wants attention.
 

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Thank you!

Labradorable-what you said about Dozer is exactly what Bailey does...I started calling it the "Bailey Blitz" as she gets this sudden burst of energy and runs and tries to bite me everytime she passes as she barks/growls. She has been doing this for a couple weeks. If I understand this is what Dozer does also? They must be similiar because they are pretty much the same age.
Yes. The "Bailey Blitz" sounds exactly like the "Dozer Dash".
 

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I will just echo what others have said. It sounds like a case of the terrible teens. Don't worry too much...a lot of this will just pass by. :) But as Toby's Trix said, don't just sit and wait for it to pass...keep insisting on good behavior and rewarding it.

One bit of advice that helped me a little is, when she gets like this, it is important that you stay very calm. If you become upset and begin to raise your voice and/or flail your arms, you are only adding to the game. :) Try being a tree. If that doesn't slow it down, leave the room. Wait a few minutes and return. If it's better, praise (quietly, don't want to get her ramped up again). If it's still going on, quietly leave again. Repeat as necessary.

Good luck! It will be fine - this doesn't last forever (although sometimes it seems like it will!)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Another rough day

Today was another rough day with Bailey. I got home from work and went to go on our long walk. Well the walk didn't last 10 minutes. She started jumping up on me and managing to bite the leash even though it is held behind her. I tried standing still but she had the leash in her mouth and started tugging at it very hard. Then I tried walking in the other direction when she started this behavior and she would also turn around and then jump up on me. I just don't get it. A week or two ago she was heeling perfectly, avoiding distractions, and was such a pleasure to walk that I looked foward to our long walks.

I then came inside and practiced training. As I was doing the training she was barking at me as I was having her do the commands.

I currently use a prong collar (I know everyone has their opinions on this already). Well this collar doesn't seem to be working at the time because she is acting up with it on.

I am very frustrated right now.
 

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try a gentle leader. Make sure to introduce it properly - slowly and gradually pairing wearing it with treats, first loose on his muzzle and then fully attached. A gentle leader head halter will enable you to control her head more easily. I would also walk her with a very short leash, which will make it quicker to bring her under control .. if you slide your hand very close to the collar, you can restrain her and prevent her from jumping and grabbing.
 

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Have you tried a gentle leader?

I suggest you put bitter apple on the leash. It might help her not to mouth it. Set her up to succeed. Get her attention, try walking for five minutes (or less eve). When she's walking nice praise her and give her a treat.

As for the training in the house. Is she crate trained or have a space of her own she can go to? If she's acting up during training, end the session as positively as possible (even if it's with a simple sit & treat) and put her in her crate/area until she settles down and try again.

If you are frustrated she is going to pick up on and feed off that. Believe me, it's no picnic, but stick with it and she'll be great. Repeat after me: "This is just a phase, this too shall pass."
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the advice...I will look into a gentle leader.

It just doesn't make sense to me! I walked her this morning before leaving for work for about 45 minutes walked perfectly. Then after work it was such torture!

We come in from our walk or lack there of a walk and she sits right by the door waiting for me to take the collar and leash off. Then I sit on the couch and she sits on the floor next me and rests her head on my lap and is so calm.

How long does this phase last??
 

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I don't see this as aggression. But an assertion of dominance.

Be absolutely clear in your commands.

W/the leash. Use LEAVE IT. W/the jumping use OFF. W/the mouthing use NO BITE. Correct the bad behavior. Praise the good.

A lot of times, the frustration kicks in 100%, and owner/handlers find themselves in a spiral of agony, yelling No. NO! NO!!!!

And the dog thinks it's the greatest hoot they've ever seen: Look at mom! Red in the face! Flailing her arms. Isn't this FUN!!!

NO is way too general for a dog to understand what you want. No.... what? running? breathing? wagging?

Specific commands. For specific responses.

I'm surprised the prong is proving ineffective. The only times I've seen it fail, really, are when it has been allowed to be tight all the time, where the dog merely learns to ignore the corrections. During walks, are you sure to keep it loose?? That's the only way it will effectively correct things like pulling.
 
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