He gets SO excited!
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  1. #1
    MooseDog's Avatar
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    DefaultHe gets SO excited!

    Hello - my dog Moose is almost 6 months old now and is *almost* the perfect puppy...with the exception that he gets TOO excited when he sees other people. He gets very jumpy when my boyfriend or I arrive home, but we turn our backs to him and try to ignore him. When we try ignoring him, he jumps up and bites at our sleeves. He's kept in a crate while we're gone, and we make him sit and stay before he can come out of his kennel to greet us - but as soon as we tell him "come" he BURSTS out and goes crazy.

    This is actually the least of our problems because he is much, much worse with strangers or other people that come into the home, that we meet on walks, outside, at the pet store, etc. For example, if we are on a walk and he sees someone in the distance he will sit/stay very nicely and wag his tail like crazy. This gives the other people the impression that he's a nice, cute little dog...but as soon as they come near to pet him he launches off and jumps on them, squealing with excitement (no "stay" or "off" will work at this point) We've tried telling other people to turn their backs when he jumps, but he'll also nip at their sleeves as well. He even goes crazy when other people have treats for him, and he won't sit or do anything nicely for the treat except jump all over the person. It's SO frustrating because people tell us "Ohhhhh he's SOOO hyper, you must have your hands full, blah blah blah". When he's in the house with my boyfriend and I, he is so sweet and mellow and well-behaved but he just loses all training and commands when he meets other people. I realize he's still a puppy and we're grateful he's a very social dog, but it's very frustrating because we know how good he CAN be!

    Any suggestions for jumping/crazy out-of-control puppies would be greatly appreciated I've read all of the other posts about jumping dogs but none of the methods have really worked. He isn't consistent with his "off" or "stay" command, so that makes if difficult. Also, it seems like he doesn't understand when you're mad...I've tried being very stern with him and it makes him more excited!

    I'll have to post new pictures one of these days too!
    Moose

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  3. #2
    luke from georgia is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: He gets SO excited!

    https://www.justlabradors.com/forum/i...c,87248.0.html

    he is still young. the excitement may lessen as he gets older, but getting him used to exciting situations and training him to become more calm in those situations can certainly help.

    "Properly trained, a man can be dog's best friend." ~ Corey Ford

  4. #3
    Scoper50 is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: He gets SO excited!

    I had the same problem with Odie when he was younger. Both my roommate and myself were turning our backs and ignoring the jumping, but it wasn't working. It just made Odie upset and crazier.

    I started telling him "no jump" and physically placing him back on four feet. It didn't take long for him to understand what "no jump" means. He still goes crazy when I get home but he doesn't jump anymore. At least not on me. The furniture is another story

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    Remi is offline Member
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    DefaultRe: He gets SO excited!

    I don't have a ton of advice but I wanted you to know you're not alone...Remi does the EXACT same thing. It drives us bonkers because when he's home or around people/dogs he knows he's super mellow. It sounds like you're doing a good job of ignoring the jumping when he does it to you, we do the same thing...Remi is only allowed to be pet by us or others if he is sitting calmly. As for the jumping on stangers while out...we always have Remi's leash on him so we can quickly correct him if he tries to jump and we work on the "sit" and "stay" commands on a daily basis to ensure they don't get lost in that little puppy brain. We also warn people ahead of time that he gets excited and ask that they wait until we say they can approach him...for the most part people are pretty good with this.

    The one thing I would suggest is not allowing others to give him treats when he behaves like that...he's already excited...the treat just reinforces that jumping and being a crazy man gets him a treat. Not to say he shouldn't get treats but I would only give them to him when he's behaving appropriately and even then I wouldn't hand feed him, drop it on the ground in front of his nose so that he doesn't all of sudden get a burst of energy and jump for the treat and/or nip it out of your hand.

    Good luck...I feel for you!

  7. #5
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    DefaultRe: He gets SO excited!

    What sound or physical touch do you use to break attention?

    Your dog is becoming fixated and you're letting the energy level increase to the point in which it crosses the "point of no return" and you'll physically have to dominate the dog to break attention.

    Do you have a pinch or a choke collar?




  8. #6
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    DefaultRe: He gets SO excited!

    Sophie does the exact same thing too! She does it more in the morning than any other time..I guess she's so excited to "see" us after being in her crate over night..even though her crate is right next to my side of the bed...if I tell her "off" or hold her mouth closed 3 times in a 30 sec-1 minute span..she goes into timeout. Her timeout spot is our powder room. She stays in there for at least a minute..if she's barking or whining, I keep her in there until she's quiet for 5-10 seconds. It generally takes one timeout and she calmer. I think it's actually just getting away for a bit for her to get herself under control again...don't get me wrong, she gnaws the rest of the day too, but I can usually redirect her with "off" and an "approved" toy.

    In reading "The Culture Clash" (thanks BobPr!) I've remembered a lot about operant conditioning and have modified how we are doing things just a bit. We were generally already using positive reinforcement, but it helped to read about how she's not "plotting revenge" or "being defiant" when she bites/gnaws.

    I personally won't ever put a choke or pinch collar on her. IMO, I wouldn't want to be treated that way so I'm not going to treat my dog that way. Again, that's just my opinion.

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    DefaultRe: He gets SO excited!

    Quote Originally Posted by indymom
    Sophie does the exact same thing too! She does it more in the morning than any other time..I guess she's so excited to "see" us after being in her crate over night..even though her crate is right next to my side of the bed...if I tell her "off" or hold her mouth closed 3 times in a 30 sec-1 minute span..she goes into timeout. Her timeout spot is our powder room. She stays in there for at least a minute..if she's barking or whining, I keep her in there until she's quiet for 5-10 seconds. It generally takes one timeout and she calmer. I think it's actually just getting away for a bit for her to get herself under control again...don't get me wrong, she gnaws the rest of the day too, but I can usually redirect her with "off" and an "approved" toy.

    In reading "The Culture Clash" (thanks BobPr!) I've remembered a lot about operant conditioning and have modified how we are doing things just a bit. We were generally already using positive reinforcement, but it helped to read about how she's not "plotting revenge" or "being defiant" when she bites/gnaws.

    I personally won't ever put a choke or pinch collar on her. IMO, I wouldn't want to be treated that way so I'm not going to treat my dog that way. Again, that's just my opinion.

    I understand your concern.

    It's just that in the dog world, dogs don't put dogs in time out.
    That's a human thing that IMO, introduces SO MANY other variables into the equation to the point where it probably only increases the energy and the confusion.

    Make it easy on yourself:

    First use a vocal marker like "ah ah ah" when the dog starts to show signs of excitment building.

    If that doesn't work(it will later when the dog understand what you want but for now, it probably won't work but be consistant) then jam your fingers into their neck as soon as they jump and say "ah ah ah". This will break attention.

    If this STILL doesn't work(which it should and it means your dog isn't taking you seriously) it's time to break out the choke collar or pitch collar and use that to physically show them what you want out of them.

    IMO if your dog fully respects you, a maker word like "ah ah ah" is all you need.


  10. #8
    Indymom's Avatar
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    DefaultRe: He gets SO excited!

    Quote Originally Posted by LuckylabLizzie
    Quote Originally Posted by indymom
    Sophie does the exact same thing too! She does it more in the morning than any other time..I guess she's so excited to "see" us after being in her crate over night..even though her crate is right next to my side of the bed...if I tell her "off" or hold her mouth closed 3 times in a 30 sec-1 minute span..she goes into timeout. Her timeout spot is our powder room. She stays in there for at least a minute..if she's barking or whining, I keep her in there until she's quiet for 5-10 seconds. It generally takes one timeout and she calmer. I think it's actually just getting away for a bit for her to get herself under control again...don't get me wrong, she gnaws the rest of the day too, but I can usually redirect her with "off" and an "approved" toy.

    In reading "The Culture Clash" (thanks BobPr!) I've remembered a lot about operant conditioning and have modified how we are doing things just a bit. We were generally already using positive reinforcement, but it helped to read about how she's not "plotting revenge" or "being defiant" when she bites/gnaws.

    I personally won't ever put a choke or pinch collar on her. IMO, I wouldn't want to be treated that way so I'm not going to treat my dog that way. Again, that's just my opinion.

    I understand your concern.

    It's just that in the dog world, dogs don't put dogs in time out.
    That's a human thing that IMO, introduces SO MANY other variables into the equation to the point where it probably only increases the energy and the confusion.

    Make it easy on yourself:

    First use a vocal marker like "ah ah ah" when the dog starts to show signs of excitment building.

    If that doesn't work(it will later when the dog understand what you want but for now, it probably won't work but be consistant) then jam your fingers into their neck as soon as they jump and say "ah ah ah". This will break attention.

    If this STILL doesn't work(which it should and it means your dog isn't taking you seriously) it's time to break out the choke collar or pitch collar and use that to physically show them what you want out of them.

    IMO if your dog fully respects you, a maker word like "ah ah ah" is all you need.

    I understand what you are saying about our "time out", however, as I said, it is working...she's able to get herself calmed down...and I don't have to cause her pain by jamming my fingers in her throat (which I truly hope sounds much worse than it is) to get her to calm down. I personally don't believe that she "misbehaves" or "doesn't listen" because she doesn't "respect my authority". I believe she doesn't listen because I haven't made myself clear in what I want her to do. When she is calmer, I can substitute an approved toy for her to chew on and she doesn't go back to my arms, the kids legs or the furniture. That's all the time out is for, to get her to calm down. Then we can work on actually teaching her what we want her to do.

    I get that she's a dog and not a "being" able to reason, she doesn't sit around plotting revenge or planning on how she's going to show me that she doesn't respect my authority. My dog is a 10 week old little puppy who needs to be taught what we expect. I don't plan on causing her pain in order to do that.

  11. #9
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    DefaultRe: He gets SO excited!

    The "pain" is in your mind, not the dogs mind. As long as the correction isn't out of anger and you keep a positive forward thinking energy there's no possible way your dog would see you as a person who is out to harm them.

    But ya, I wouldn't use a choke/pitch collar on a puppy that young.

    I waited til around the 4 month mark to use the choke collar for walks.

    I really didn't need to take it that far with my dog though, we already had a deep understanding of the rules and boundries by the 4 month mark using NILF. SO much so she had free roam of the house outside of the crate at the 4 month mark when we where gone at work/school.

    As for it working for you, there's no way you know that yet if your pup is that young, time will tell. One thing is for sure, the first 4 months of the dogs life are going to make and break how and who the dog will be and I personally wouldn't waste one ounce of time applying human forms of discipline.

    Dogs live in the now and "time out" is for a human to take a break and think about what they did wrong and what they're going to do differently next time. I highly doubt your dog has the mental compacity to accomplish this human task.

  12. #10
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    DefaultRe: He gets SO excited!

    In our home, we taught Milly to carry a toy to the front door to greet people. By carrying something in her mouth she never jumped. Go figure why but it bloody worked!! Out and about well that was a huge different story. We spent ALOT of training time on this, Obedience class also helped alot... being around other dogs and people every week and not being allowed to "play" or interact with them during class like a normal social walk helped us 150%

    We first started the training with each other, I was home with Milly in the yard doing heeling work. Dave approaches us and I put Milly in a sit/stay... I keep telling her the "watch" command to keep her attention, treat and praise.. treat and praise. As soon as her attention broke and she lunged towards Dave, he turned and walked out of sight. She was at first very puzzled... usually she got pats! What's going on!

    repeat repeat repeat repeat repeat... the longer she sat still the more praise and treats. Eventually he'd get to pat her, she'd lunge.. he'd walk away. She soon enough learnt that the more she sat, the more interaction he gave her. We then got a family member to do the same thing, and then a neighbour, and then a friend, and then a stranger.

    Out on walks (and we STILL do this) if she is not sitting when people approach her, I apologise "sorry Milly is learning to behave while being approached by strangers can you please not pat her until she's sitting" they always generally are happy to oblige. When she is sitting, I tell them ok please try now. If she moves "sorry she's not behaving today, would you mind not patting her" and we walk in the other direction.

    Especially ESPECIALLY important with kids too. Works well... and this has really helped her nail the sit for examination part of her obedience (stand for exam we're still working on)

    It takes PATIENCE, REPETITION and TIME to perfect this. We use a choke collar for Milly, even sometimes a small check is all that is required as well as the "agh agh agh" in a stern voice as mentioned by Lizzie to get her to behave. "Agh Agh NO Jump" works well... she KNOWS what that means and she will always 100% of the time sit when I give that command around people .... Dogs is a WHOLE other story for us at the moment

    Modified to add: Not sure if this is a GOOD thing or not (lol) but if I make any sound similar to the agh agh that I have used with her since we got her at 9 weeks (from 9 weeks - 4 months this was my main "NO" command.. the "agh agh agh" and I used it ALOT *grin*) she stops whatever it is that she's doing ... even EATING... sits and looks at me with her ears forward "what??!?! what did I DO? I didn't do ANYTHING mum!" haha .... But hey! It gets her attention immediately right?
    Sarah & Milly - Sydney Australia






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