Frustrated Pup
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Thread: Frustrated Pup

  1. #1
    amar is offline Junior Member
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    Aug 2008
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    DefaultFrustrated Pup

    I have a 9 Mos old chocolate who turns to biting what is within mouths reach when frustrated; chair, person. It really becomes ugly if the wife trys to make her do something she doesn't want to do. She turns her back and walks away, but the dog will still nip at her backside. Any suggestions?

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  3. #2
    Chester B. Dickens is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Frustrated Pup

    Teach NO BITE. Either with a muzzle-hold or a spray bottle.

  4. #3
    imported_BigBrownDog is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Frustrated Pup

    Quote Originally Posted by amar
    I have a 9 Mos old chocolate who turns to biting what is within mouths reach when frustrated; chair, person. It really becomes ugly if the wife trys to make her do something she doesn't want to do. She turns her back and walks away, but the dog will still nip at her backside. Any suggestions?
    When "the wife" or anyone else in your family gives a command that the dog does not follow and then walks away the dog is taught that following commands is optional. Sounds to me like an obedience class would be very helpful here before he is bigger and less interested in listening to you. His following her and nipping her butt is WAY disrespectful. Would not fly in my house at all.

    On the other hand - this could also be an expression of his lack of an outlet for pent up energy. How much daily exercise is he getting?
    Sharon

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  6. #4
    imported_MilesMom is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Frustrated Pup

    Hi there! These dogs do need lots of excersize EVERY DAY - not optional.

    I do agree that an obed class is a good idea. I go every week and I have learned sooo much. I am still learning after 2 year!!
    The trainer can observe the behavior and show you how to correct it. Make sure you agree with the philosophies of the trainer you work with. Some believe in treat rewards, some don't. I feel anything that rewards desired behavior should be allowed.
    <br /><br />Grand River Run Genaration &quot;Miles&quot;&nbsp; CGC RN, RL1, RL2, RA, CW-SR, C-OB1, RL1X, RL3, RE

  7. #5
    luke from georgia is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Frustrated Pup

    is your wife trying to force the dog to perform a specific command, like sit? is that when the dog behaves badly?

    dogs are thinking individuals with free will, not robots. a lot of dogs don't react well to physically forced manipulation or other tactics that make them feel cornered or helpless. you can train your dog to make good choices that are in line with your wishes/commands. you just have to take the time and make the effort to training the dog.

    give your dog clear instructions and rules of what is and what is not good behavior, help her understand you control all the good things in her life (including food, your time, attention, or affection) and that you will share or provide access to those resources when she displays the actions and behaviors you want her to perform.

    dogs will repeat behaviors that result in desirable outcomes and decrease behaviors that result in undesirable outcomes. outcomes that are neither desirable nor undesirable to the dog results in behaviors that are inconsistent, unpredictable, and unreliable. this is why consistency is a key component of dog training. dogs need consistently reliable outcomes to their behaviors in order for their behaviors to become consistently reliable. with enough repetition, you won't have to constantly reward your dog, because by that point, the response to the cue will be habit formed and automatic.

    if you want the dog to repeat a behavior ON CUE, ie a verbal "sit" command, you must reinforce the behavior in order for that behavior to become more likely to be repeated on cue. usually, reinforcements are provided through rewards. if your dog is food motivated, food would be a good reward. if your dog is toy motivated, giving a toy would be a good reward. if you only give petting and verbal praise to your dog as their reward, but your dog is actually indifferent toward that those things, then those would NOT be a good reward for sitting on cue.

    also, keep in mind that time spent on training is not merely an opportunity to drill the dog over and over again to obtain compliance and obedience. a large part of training is about building the relationship you have with your dog. if there is no bond or connection between human and dog, then how could you ever expect their cooperation. be patient and try to see things from your dogs point of view. make training fun. keep sessions short and upbeat. enjoy the time with your dog, set her up to succeed, and she will start wanting to make the kinds of choices that makes her humans happy of her own free will. when you work WITH your dog, instead of AGAINST her, you'll start seeing changes for the better.


    "Properly trained, a man can be dog's best friend." ~ Corey Ford

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