STAY WITH ME
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Thread: STAY WITH ME

  1. #1
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    DefaultSTAY WITH ME

    I know this may sound a little crazy, but I have seen those people with dogs that do not need a leash they just stick next to there owner with out one....how do I train Denali to do this when he starts getting older?

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  3. #2
    Karolyn is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: STAY WITH ME

    I can't wait to see the answer for this one I am very interested as well!

  4. #3
    kaytris is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: STAY WITH ME

    Leashes are safety lines. If you live in any kind of urban centre, please leash your dog.

    Having said that, any good obedience class will teach you how to train your dog to come when called and walk beside you.

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  6. #4
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    kaznalf is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: STAY WITH ME

    Quote Originally Posted by csully
    I know this may sound a little crazy, but I have seen those people with dogs that do not need a leash they just stick next to there owner with out one....how do I train Denali to do this when he starts getting older?
    I think alot of it has alot to do with the relationship you have with your dog, training can also be put in...say teaching off leash heel but i think the thing that stops them wondering off is the relationship...all they will think about is you, you are their world and they will want to be with you and not bothered about whats going on around them

  7. #5
    Tanya is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: STAY WITH ME

    Quote Originally Posted by kaznalf
    Quote Originally Posted by csully
    I know this may sound a little crazy, but I have seen those people with dogs that do not need a leash they just stick next to there owner with out one....how do I train Denali to do this when he starts getting older?
    I think alot of it has alot to do with the relationship you have with your dog, training can also be put in...say teaching off leash heel but i think the thing that stops them wondering off is the relationship...all they will think about is you, you are their world and they will want to be with you and not bothered about whats going on around them
    Actually...i think it has to do in part with your relationship, but also has ALOT to do with the dog. Some dogs are just naturally more by your side while others will always remain adventurous. It doesn't mean they love you any less or think of you any less, just part of their nature.

    I agree with the above, i shutter when I see dogs offleash in teh city near roads. Dogs are still animals and even the best train dog has a lapse in judgment. In the city that could be one second and could have terrible consequences. I also dislike the fact that they are 20 feet from their owner sometimes so you see the dog before the owner. there are people out there who have great fear of dogs, I don't think that's right (YOU know your dog will listen, OTHERS do not and will still be afraid).

    Having said all that, if it's for walks away from roads and in safety, it's about training. Taking the long route to ensure you teach a good, solid recall. This takes a few years (on average)
    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

  8. #6
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    DefaultRe: STAY WITH ME

    Here is a practical approach.
    Use a 2' leash, walk your dog for various amounts of time everyday, or as regularly as possible. If you are training for a left side heel- feed your dog for position. Lower your left hand and feed where you want your dog to be. As this strenghtens, you can take them off leash and see how they do for various distances, but not too long of times.
    The trick that I do is hold the leash in my right hand behind my back. Your body then helps to control how far the dog can get ahead of you, you can pull your right arm out or backwards and this will restrict your dog getting ahead of you, then treat when they are not pulling. Timing and position is key when feeding. If you feed when they are pulling, you are training them to pull. As soon as they stop pulling, treat.
    I am only providing a quick overview, if you have specific questions to this I am glad to respond.

    Doug

  9. #7
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    DefaultRe: STAY WITH ME

    Thanks everyone for your feedback....as for us doing this in the city "NO WAY" we would never try this in a busy area. Iam sorry I should ahve been a little more clear...no more or less when we go to walking trails, in the woods, or just walking bewteen our yard and our neighbors house "which we are close to" but never in heavy traffic. But thank to all the great feed back once again.

  10. #8
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    YellowJakesMom is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: STAY WITH ME

    I have what I would describe as a very reliable off-leash dog. He's also almost 3. How did we get that way? He was leashed his entire puppyhood. Honestly, I can't think of any major situation where SO and I called him that we couldn't reel him in if he didn't come. If he was off-leash, we lured him back with treats. If we were at the dog park, we caught him instead of calling him and giving him a chance to ignore us. Basically, Jake never learned that "come" was an optional command.

    Each time we said "here" for the first two years of his life, we had a specific way to be sure he came (maybe 3-5% of the time we goofed and said "here" when we couldn't enforce it). That, I believe is the trick. If a dog thinks they have to come when you say come - and that good things will happen when they come (he always got a reward/party when he came), you will have a dog with reliable recall who can be offleash in safe areas. Now even when we're offleash at the park on the trails, he'll run ahead, stop and run back to get his reward for "checking in" with us.

    It's a pleasure to be able to let him offleash, but also one that took a lot of hard work, and some time. I would do things the same way with my next dog as well My advice: take it slowly, remember your dog's maturity level, and set them up for success.

    Only after the last tree has been cut down, only after the last river has been poisoned, only after the last fish has been caught, only then will you find that money cannot be eaten. - Cree prophecy

  11. #9
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    Trickster is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: STAY WITH ME

    Everyone has a differing view on this.

    First, as mentioned, dogs should NEVER be let off leash anywhere near a road or other dangers. People who do this are often foolling themselves about their dogs level of training. I trust my own dogs off leash implicitly but I don't trust morons on the roads. Do not risk it.

    I for one do not think recall depends on relationship. My neighbours have a Golden Retriever. She is two years and a very, very well loved and looked after dog. She is absolutely fine when off leash in a fenced in area but outside of a fenced area, her recall is ZERO. And believe me, I have worked with this dog since they have had her, but her recall does not exist. As soon as she smells something she is off like a lightning bolt and unless you physically chase after her to bring her back, she will not come. All the treats, toys and training methods under the sun will not get this dog to return willingly. I have a great relationship with her as do her owners, but her VERY strong scent drive, selective hearing and stubbornness make her recall extremely difficult.

    As for my dogs, I have had them off leash since day one. In safe areas, of course. When they are puppies they won't move an inch from your feet when you let them off leash for the first week or so. It is only after that first week or so that they gain confidence and start to wander further away to explore. It is during this time when you can really start to drill in basic recall training.

    In male dogs in particular, it is when they hit sexual maturity (6+ months) that they really start to play up and test boundaries.

  12. #10
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    DefaultRe: STAY WITH ME

    OT:
    Trickster- Great Photo of Rosie in your siggy! She is beautiful!

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