teaching "off"
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: teaching "off"

  1. #1
    Barnsley is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    886

    Defaultteaching "off"

    I am trying to teach Barnsley not to get up on things with his paws by teaching him off. He just doesn't seem to be getting it though. I will say it 20 times before he does it each time, or I end up pushing him down/lifting his legs off. Then he does it again immediately. Treats don't really work because he climbs up more with them. Eventually he gets tired of the "game" and will go lay down or at least sit down and leave us alone. I need to get him to do it better on command though. He does pretty good staying off the furniture and bed but often gets half way up and in your face. This is really not good if people are over or we are trying to eat something.*
    What tips/tricks have you used to teach this

    Barnsley's mom
    <br />Barnsley &amp; Lilly from Okinawa, Japan

  2. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Chester B. Dickens is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    20,085

    DefaultRe: teaching "off"

    Keep a leash on for a couple of days and use it to collar-correct.

    You should be issuing a command once and then enforcing. OFF! and then pull him down from the counter. And then praise.

    Saying it over and over and over and over is only teaching him to ignore it -- that Mom says things that he can blow off with no consequences whatsoever.

    Say what you mean; mean what you say! ;D

  4. #3
    brianttu is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    229

    DefaultRe: teaching "off"

    I agree with Dweck. Our trainer tells us to say it 2 times, then re-enforce what you want with the command and the physical action.
    Thanks,<br /><br />Brian<br /><br /><br />CGC, TDI Certified

  5. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Barnsley is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    886

    DefaultRe: teaching "off"

    Thanks for the advice I will try the leash thing. He also does it is when we are in bed. Any ideas for when you are laying down??? I'm not sure how I would use a leash. Usually I push him off if I have to. Sometimes he can be so stubborn, as I am learning. You know that they can do it but they are really testing you. They are furry kids!
    <br />Barnsley &amp; Lilly from Okinawa, Japan

  7. #5
    theoconbrio is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    AccountKiller
    Posts
    16,129

    DefaultRe: teaching "off"

    What behavior would you prefer? Teach that and reward it, while preventing the unwanted behavior. If the dog drags the leash around, call him for a treat and step on the leash. Let him try to jump and fail (the leash should be taut enough that he won't get his paws on you). Eventually, he will give up and do something else like sit or lie down. When he does, praise effusively and give him the treat. It takes some patience (and you may have to set up devious situations where you know he will try to jump up--the important thing is to *make sure he fails*) but it does work. You can teach even a boisterous dog to sit for petting when strangers come in the house, but the key to making it work is to make sure that they never have the opportunity to jump in the first place.

    Once you get a good "off" when you are standing/sitting, then you can work on lying down. Meanwhile you could tether or crate him when you're lying down. Make sure to reward for calm behavior when tethered!

  8. #6
    theoconbrio is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    AccountKiller
    Posts
    16,129

    DefaultRe: teaching "off"

    Oh, I misread your post. You're talking about jumping up on things (sofa, bed), not jumping up on you? Sorry.

    Anyway, my preferred strategy with furniture is just to buy lots of dog blankets.* Often if you correct them for not jumping on the couch, they'll just learn to jump up on the couch when you're not around. The thing about punishment is that it often prevents the behavior in the presence of the punisher, but doesn't extinguish the desire for the reward (in this case getting on the furniture).

    Also teach him "place"--give him an alternative place to lie down that he likes. http://www.shirleychong.com/keepers/archives/mat.txt The technique used here is called "free shaping," which I find tedious and unnecessary for this exercise. I have a better description at home but not in an electronic file, unfortunately. Basically, you could begin just by dropping treats on the mat and associating it with good things.

  9. #7
    Chester B. Dickens is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    20,085

    DefaultRe: teaching "off"

    My best advice for getting the dog off the bed is to not let him up there in the first place....

  10. #8
    brianttu is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    229

    DefaultRe: teaching "off"

    Use off and use physical force to remove your dog from the bed. We allow Allie on the bed only right before we turn off the TV and when Shannon gets up for work. Usually we allow her up when we invite her, if we do not invite her, we use off and tell her to get on her own bed. This has been working for us, but from time to time she attemps to get on our bed and sleep, we wake up and tell her off and she does. If your dog isnt getting off, I would stop getting on the bed all together or use force...
    Thanks,<br /><br />Brian<br /><br /><br />CGC, TDI Certified

  11. #9
    BudGirl8 Guest

    DefaultRe: teaching "off"

    I'm not sure how old your pup is or how far along he is in the "down-stay" portion of his training...but when I got Billie she'd been trained to be in the "down-stay" for 20-30 minutes at a time during meals at the correctional facility where she was trained. Now, she tries to test me and won't do that for that long in my house but we're working back up to it. When it's time for me to eat, she gets put in "down-stay" about 5 feet away from me, where I keep eye contact with her, but she can't be in my face or get near food or anything. I don't have any tolerance for begging or that kind of behavior, especially knowing she was trained to lay down, with no handlers anywhere around for 30 minutes at a time off leash with 15 other dogs lined up against a wall. She thinks she's got me buffaloed, and I'm being patient with her. Eventually I'll get it to where I expect her to go lay down and stay on the other side of the room without eye contact and without constant verbal correction. You might try something like this if your dog is able to do the "down-stay" for a few minutes at a time, practice it during your mealtimes, and gradually work it up to longer periods to where you can eat without him being in your face.

    As far as the bed, I only let Billie on my bed when I'm not in it and when "her" comforter is on it. If she gets up there without these two conditions being met, she's told to get off and has about half a second to comply before being forcibly removed by her collar...and she hasn't had much problem understanding anymore that "her" comforter and me being out of the bed are the two conditions that need to be met before she can get up there. She'll put her nose up over the edge to check on me, or wake me up, but no feet anymore. Just took some work to make her understand. I would put "her" comforter on it, let her get up there, tell her "good girl" and let her stay. Any other time or tries, it was a no go.

    And I don't know how anyone else does it, but since Billie is so SOOO stubborn about some things and even with enforcement (correction only when I can enforce it with a leash etc) she ignores me sometimes, when it's a behavior like chewing her toys on my leg and then biting me, I got a can of air, and whooshed it (pointed away from her of course - it was for noise effect only) when I said "NO CHEW". It startled her enough to let her know that I meant what I said. "No chew" is no longer an issue. She keeps her chew toys to herself.

  12. #10
    Barnsley is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    886

    DefaultRe: teaching "off"

    Thanks for all the great information , we have a no furniture no sleeping in the bed policy for Barnsley so he already knows he can't stay there when he gets up there. I think some of his behavior is the typical testing. We always make him get off right away and he has never been on the bed more than a couple of seconds. That long down stay is a killer! He hates when I make him work on it. I am amazed by the dogs that can exhibit such patience and obedience. Hopefully one day that will be Barnsley also. Today he was not into listening. We will work on the down stay again tomorrow. I would love if he would do that during meals. He likes to go under the table and for now we think that is a lot better than having him try to put his nose up on the table. After a few "no's" and "sit" he will back off and let us eat in peace. BudGirl8, I know exactly what you are talking about when they try to chew their toy against your leg and then they bite you in the process. I am always telling Barnsley that I am not a chew toy holder! He has those nylabones and they get really sharp after he has gnawed on them. My husband and I call them "Barnsley's weapons". They really hurt if they shove them against your bare skin! Good thing he is so cute. It is hard to stay mad at anything with eyes like a lab.
    <br />Barnsley &amp; Lilly from Okinawa, Japan

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25