Issues with Lindy
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Thread: Issues with Lindy

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    DefaultIssues with Lindy

    First she is beautiful and sweet and I'm so glad she's finally home with us. I look in those eyes and melt. She seems to really like being with us already. no problems eating. Two things we have challenges with are:

    1. Pooping and peeing in her crate at night - she did not make a sound until after she did it. How do you deal with that????

    2. Puppy nipping- we are saying "no bite" and giving her a chew toy but boy, does she seem determined to do it. She'll definately outgrow it right? and how do I help my son not to be hurt or scared by it? (He's 11)

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  3. #2
    Dani's Avatar
    Dani is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Issues with Lindy

    Make sure the crate is divided off so that she only has enough room to turn around and lay down in.

    Another way to lower the biting is to gently grab the muzzle and say NO BITE firmly.
    Dani, Rider & Rookie
    SHR Watson's Safari Rider, JH, WC, CL1-R, RA, CGC, TDI
    SHR Endeavor Put Me In Coach, RN, WC, CGC

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  4. #3
    ThatsMyGirl Guest

    DefaultRe: Issues with Lindy

    Ditto Dani's advice.

    Also, I have a child the same age as yours.* Is your son scared? I did not have that problem but I'd just give it some time and lots of supervision.* You just need to make sure that he understand that this is normal canine behavior.* That is how they play with their littermates.* Of course, Lindy will outgrow it -- in about 3 months.* But it will take longer with your son, just because he's smaller and will be seen more like a "littermate".

    Make sure that if your son is playing with Lindy and she gets too wound up and bitey, that he does not allow her near his face, because Lindy will surely bite his nose or ear or anything else she can stick her little razors in.* I always told my kids to get up off the floor & ignore Sami when she was "wild".* She learned pretty quickly that we just wouldn't play with her when she was like that.*

    The method that worked for us was YELPING really loudly when Sami would nip us.* It would startle her.* We would then say "no bite" and immediately turn our backs and walk away from her.* That method probably worked best for us ... but there are certainly other methods to try.*

    Be patient and don't expect the biting to go away completely* -- even with all of the consistency in the world -- until Lindy has her adult teeth in around 5 1/2 months.

    *

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  6. #4
    Chester B. Dickens is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Issues with Lindy

    We've got little kids in the house, too - TELL YOUR SON NOT TO RUN when Lindy gets nippy. This was a huge challenge w/our kids -- Wes would get rambunctious, and to escape, they'd scream and run (they're girls). This only kicks in the chase drive, making the issue worse.

    We taught them how to calmly redirect him from biting them to biting someting acceptable OR from biting them to KISSING them OR firmly issuing a NO BITE or LEAVE IT (depending on the issue) OR guiding him to his crate for some time-out time......

  7. #5
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    DefaultRe: Issues with Lindy

    I know how you feel!! My hand looks like I've been in the briar patch!! LOL I've learned the hard way to make sure when Polly is "wound up" to give her a chewy toy till she calms down and I also use the no bite. I have to say this is working well until I start walking and then.......look out!! For some reason she loves my toes!! : I swear I nearly fall 10 times a day because she get right between my feet when I'm walking.

  8. #6
    Ender's Mom's Avatar
    Ender's Mom is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Issues with Lindy

    We did the *yelp* "NO BITE" turn away and ignore thing.

    We also encouraged Ender BIG TIME when he licked our fingers saying "GOOD KISSES" over and over again. *Now he's a big-time kisser and hasn't nipped us in over a month (unless it was by accident while he was grabbing for a toy) and he's 4.5 months old.

    I think another reason why Ender dropped the biting thing quickly is because he spent a lot of time around other "safe" dogs (my mother's 4 yr old lab) and that interaction with other dogs taught him bite inhibition. *He also has a TON of toys when he learned to chew on...

    In the end... I think it mostly boils down to praising the heck out of a puppy when he/she is doing something you like (i.e. chewing on a toy) instead of only correcting them when they are doing something you don't like. *
    ~Lindsay

  9. #7
    Chester B. Dickens is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Issues with Lindy

    Stepping/tripping on the dog - We run into this a lot in obed classes. Handlers will heel their dogs and the dogs won't be paying attention and a paw will get tromped.

    Our standard line: DO NOT APOLOGIZE TO THE DOG! Use it as a learning oppty. In other words, "If you'd been heeling where you were supposed to and WATCHING ME, this wouldn't have happened, silly!" I realize this can be different from just galloping around the house, but if there's an opportunity to assert yourself as Alpha, DO IT!

    Some handlers get all mooshy-gooshy over trodding on a limb, when in actuality, it was the dog's fault in the first place. And SOME of this can be passive dominant behavior, trotting slightly in FRONT of you, angled in to impede your forward motion juuuuust a little bit to see if they can get away w/it.

    Not too dissimilar from the LEAAAAAAAAANING some dogs do. Or resting their paws on your foot!

  10. #8
    Join Date
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    DefaultRe: Issues with Lindy

    what a difference 24 hours makes. Last night she went out at 11 pm then i head shuffling around 3:30 am so I took her out, she peed then hopped back in my arms, slept until 7 am and out again. no messes in crate!!
    She is starting to understand the chew toy concept so I have been successful in substituting hand for toy so far today. Her favorite toy is her Nylabone teething keys.

  11. #9
    curly is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultRe: Issues with Lindy

    Glad to see you got your puppy home Dreamer! We are running into the same thing right now with Zakk. He just started biting this afternoon and we are starting holding the muzzle and reinforcing with "no bite".

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    DefaultRe: Issues with Lindy

    We have a 10 year son and a Callie girl who is 19 weeks (or 4.5 months)....DS was also a bit frightened of Callie when she went into BEZERK mode but it is tapering off a bit now. We use the "no bite" and give a toy to chew on but in addition we set a few ground rules that have seemed to help out a bit.

    Rule #1 - Don't lay on the floor with her unless she has just been exercised outside and is just about ready to go into nap mode......when Callie is tired, she is much less likely to bite and rough play with our son, who is considered a litter mate....tired Callie just wants to cuddle...wide awake Callie just wants to nip and roll and tuck and run etc.

    Rule # 2 - As she begins the BEZERK mode, we all use the word "settle" and then "outside play" and then we grab the leash and out the door we go....BEZERK MODE requires the 20 ft lead and a ball, frizbee or rope for throwing. Then as she tuckers out a bit and wants to be cuddled we again are safer from the biting mode. (We're in a drought so rainy days haven't been an issue for us....)

    This rule is also being modified a little each week....now we insist she settle and then we wait five or so minutes before taking her outside for romp time....

    It was difficult in the beginning; we heard quite a few times how DS "didn't like" Callie, or how "mean" she was. Each time he became hurt, or frustrated, we simply reminded him that she was a baby and that it was our responsibility to train her to live with us how we wanted her to live with us. And, we constantly reminded him that how he interacted with her now would determine how close they were when she grew older.

    Our last yellow was his "Nanny", almost literally. She slept with him and followed him out to play, keeping constant guard over him from the minute he was born until she passed two years ago this June. He still cries when her name is mentioned and his room is decorated with photos of Shanna; so it is vitally important to me to help him with his relationship with Callie now for the future he wants to have with her.

    So, whatever it takes, involve your son proactively with your puppy by giving him the tools he needs to be able to deal with whirling dervish that all puppies spend a little time each day being!

    Good Luck!

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