7 month old lab attacks babysitter!
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Thread: 7 month old lab attacks babysitter!

  1. #1
    jojuvan is offline Junior Member
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    Default7 month old lab attacks babysitter!

    Samson, our 7 month old yellow lab, is crazy when our baby sitter comes over every morning. The baby sitter is a grown BIG guy (22 years old), but somehow Samson has deemed him is personal play toy. Samson is very good with all members of our family (myself, my husband and our 3 kids). But when our sitter comes over Samson immediately jumps on him multiple times, brings him toys to play with, barks at him all the time, and even tries to bite (play bite) and jump all over him when he sits down. I've seen the way our sitter interacts with Samson and I see how this has happened. I think our sitter was trying to be polite at first by petting and playing and throwing the ball... but now Samson has learned that he can act this way with the sitter because he gets so much attention. Now the sitter is getting sick of this and Samson is not willing to change this behavior.

    The last few mornings I've kind of hung around to see how Samson reacts once the sitter gets in the house. I make sure he sits before he gets any attention from the sitter, but as soon as I leave the room Samson starts with the jumping and biting. Then I come in and command him to stop and sit, which he does. The sitter is amazed at how he listens to me but not him, and I try to explain to him how to handle him, and what to say and do, but I think he's offended now. It's come to a point now where I have to lock up Samson during the time the sitter is there (3 hours a day).

    I don't want to have to do this, I want to train Samson to be good with the sitter, but ultimately I think it's up to the sitter to maintain that control over Samson. I also don't want to lose the sitter over our dog!

    any advice would be appreciated on how to handle this situation. Thank you!

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  3. #2
    dogfur is offline Member
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    Default

    I don't want to have to do this, I want to train Samson to be good with the sitter, but ultimately I think it's up to the sitter to maintain that control over Samson. I also don't want to lose the sitter over our dog!

    any advice would be appreciated on how to handle this situation. Thank you![/QUOTE]

    I would not like my sitter or anyone training my dog. I train my dogs and they behave with anyone. The sitter may not have any idea how to train a dog and do things you do not want him to do.

    Tell the sitter to walk away or turn his back and not engage with Sampson. Make Sampson sit when you or anyone else comes into the house and no verbal or eye contact. No contact at all until he is still, then praise and a treat. Train him to sit politely when people pat him. If he brings a toy ignore it.
    I would be offended and not come to the house if I was expected to train someones dog. We don't go to a family members house for that very reason.

  4. #3
    Bob Pr. is offline Senior Member
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    I strongly suspect your Samson is not getting enough exercise. Below is a copy of a post I've often made.

    If you can fit into your schedule, exercising Samson 30 to 60 minutes or so before your baby sitter comes
    would be very helpful.

    Alternatively, have the baby sitter with your kids, exercise Samson by playing fetch in your back yard;
    that would also be a great alternative.

    This is a copy of a post I've often made:

    I strongly suspect that your pup is getting WAY too LITTLE exercise.

    Labs are high energy dogs and they need daily vigorous exercise -- not just a leashed daily walk or alone time in the fenced backyard, but the opportunity to run, chase, play, retrieve, etc. (The generally accepted rule of thumb for exercising Labs is 5 minutes for each month of age up to a year old. But learn to "read" your Lab, i.e., judge its behavior. If it gets bored and is chewing table legs or wallboard, up the amount of exercise. My Puff as a pup needed 2 doses of that a day, each dose separated by about 8-12 hours but she settled down as she got older.)

    The lack of adequate daily vigorous exercise has often been said to be the #1 reason for rehoming or giving up ownership of a Lab.

    Teaching a Lab to retrieve is an easy way to provide them with exercise without exhausting the owner.

    My Puff is almost 9 years old
    (update: now 12 y.o) and I take her for a daily 40 min. offleash walk in a nearby nature preserve early every morning. I walk 2 miles, Puff gets 30 or more retrieves, some from slinging her training dummy, some from dropping it on the trail and sending her back to fetch it (that gives her longer runs than my slinging it). Some days she gets more exercise later.

    Result?

    She dozes until she hears me about to do something (go for the car, go outside, etc.) and then she's by my side.

    With my previous Lab, Bess, I lived near a pond which gave us the opportunity after work to use daily swimming retrieves which are an even better exercise than the dry land fetching. Probably 30 minutes of swimming retrieves is about equal to fifty minutes of walking and retrieving on land depending on how many retrieves with either.

    While daily exercise sessions are good for your Lab, they're also good for you. Many recent scientific studies have shown that dog owners are healthier than non-dog owners and the presumed reason is because the dog owners also get exercise from giving it to their dogs. You'll be healthier, your dog will be more comfortable to live with, when you fit this into your daily schedule.

    Maybe there are a few places that don't have ponds or nature preserves for daily exercise? Not a problem. Find a fenced in school yard or ball field to use for retrieving a training dummy or chasing a Chuck-it! ball (BUT be sure you pick up any fecal deposits your dog makes). And/or find a neighbor with a fenced backyard and a sociable friendly dog (a Lab would be best) with which your Lab can have a daily playdate for an hour so both can get pooped from chasing and wrestling each other. Or find a "Bark Park" (AKA "Dog Park") in your area. When I take trips with Puff, I stop at a rest area every 2 hours and give her 10-15 minutes of retrieving. It keeps me fresh and it helps her stay calm.

    Training dummies are sold at a variety of online places including this: w ww.gundogsupply.com I buy the 2x12" "Lucky Dog" vinyl training dummies. (DO NOT LET YOUR DOG CHEW ON THEM LIKE A CHEW TOY; USE THEM ONLY FOR RETRIEVING.)

    Chuck-it is also sold at many places online or in local pet stores. For example see Amazon for Chuckit-Launcher


    "A Tired Lab is a Good Lab" -- Socrates

    "A Bored Lab that is not Tired is a Royal P.I.T.A" -- Confucius

    "A Dozing Lab Rarely Causes Problems" -- Bhagavad Gita

    "A Lab sufficiently exercised has partaken of Nature's own Prozac and Valium" -- Hippocrates


    Puff [YF, AKC field line (from competing HT/FT breeder) 62 lbs, dob: 8-'01]

    Bess [BF, AKC bench line (from competing show breeder) 55 lbs., 1967-1981] "Poor Bess, the Wonder Dog":
    http://forum.justlabradors.com/showt...?p=748#post748

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  6. #4
    jojuvan is offline Junior Member
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    I am not at all saying I wanted my sitter to train my dog. I said I want to train him to act correctly, BUT the sitter needs to maintain that behavior (follow through). Samson will not learn a thing if the sitter continues to let Samson do what he's been doing (jumping on him, mouthing him...etc.) Like I said, Samson does not do any of this behavior with anyone in our family, or any other guests for that matter... it's just with the sitter. Yes, sometimes he will jump up on guests when they first arrive, but after quick corrections he calms down and goes back to life as normal. It's not the case with the sitter. I really believe Samson has somehow assimilated himself as the alpha over our babysitter.

    My question I guess is how to get Samson to listen and DO what he knows he's supposed to do even when I'm not there, and even when someone else is giving the commands.

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