Please help wit 6 month old lab- bone aggression and potty question
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Thread: Please help wit 6 month old lab- bone aggression and potty question

  1. #1
    WMD
    WMD is offline Junior Member
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    DefaultPlease help wit 6 month old lab- bone aggression and potty question

    Hi,

    I have had our lab puppy since 8 weeks old and have been diligent with training. We have had issues from the beginning with growling over bones. We were told to do the submission roll so the dog would know we are alpha. It seemed to go away but has come back. We are very concerned to see this in a young puppy and we have children in the house. We did just neuter our dog to see if it would help, any suggestions? He seems sweet in so many other ways so we are just blown away with this issue.

    Also, we have crated our dog at night and when we are not home since the beginning and have only given our puppy access on tile in our home. We have bell trained him to go potty outside and everything has gone well, no accidents on the tile in in about 2 months or so. He is well exercised, goes outside often and does not have a UTI. Today we tried to give him access to another room which is carpeted. After doing fine for about 20 minutes he peed on the carpet. I thought he was housebroken but now am concerned he isn't. I caught him in the act, yelled no and put him outside. Any suggestions or help in understanding why? We would love to have him extend into our family room but now am questioning if he can be trusted.

    Thanks for any advice or input.

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    Tanya is offline Senior Member
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    urgh - who suggested the alpha roll a baby? that was unfortunately bad and outdated advice.

    i recommend obedience classes (wih a good trainer), nothing in life is free (NILF) - you can google it or search it on the forum. and no more rolling the puppy.
    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

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    Dog Paddle is offline Senior Member
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    oops. double post.
    Last edited by Dog Paddle; 06-07-2013 at 04:14 PM.

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    Dog Paddle is offline Senior Member
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    I'm all for taking the easy way out if you can and for me that would be simply no more bones. However if you want to address the growling over bones issue I like the website I will give you a link to at the bottom here for it's information on food aggression. Bones are about the highest value treat there is so I would treat it the same way. And I like Dr. Ed Bailey on food aggression: Your dog's food is his. Give him his food and let him eat in peace, no messing around with hands in his face or his bowl or kids pestering him. Watch your kids. Your kids are YOUR responsibility, not your dog's. It makes me shudder when I hear people say they trained the dog to be tolerant with his food around the kids and then leave total responsibility for a child's safety up the dog. A dog, for heaven's sake, with what some say is the intelligence of a two year old child. IMO bones are much harder though, they don't gulp a bone down quickly. Hopefully they don't.

    Doggone Safe - Home

    http://www.cappdt.ca/UserFiles/File/...%20parents.pdf The food aggression article from the link above

    The importance of consistency: be a leader, not an alpha male. - Free Online Library This is Dr. Bailey's answer to a situation similar to yours.


    The peeing on your carpet is so easy. You said it yourself, he'd not been on anything other than tile floor. You only trained him not to pee on tile. You didn't train him to not pee on carpet. Dogs don't generalize well. Training a pup not to pee on tile in the kitchen may very well not translate in his puppy brain to not pee in the house anywhere. He might pee on your friend's tile in her kitchen too because he has not been trained in other places yet. After a while it does click in but you have to train him in many places before he will understand that and of course some do catch on quicker than others. This is why it's good to have your puppy explore your house with you while you supervise, while he's young. So you can catch these things.

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    WMD
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    Thank you so much for the information I will look at it. I did learn the alpha roll from a trainer but am trying more positive things now such as out, come and treating when he does it. I don't want us to be afraid of him because at some point he may get something that is dangerous that we may have to take away. Thanks again.

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    WMD
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    Dog Paddle

    Thank you for posting all the information, I will take a look and hopefully can use some of the info. I have thought about doing away with treats but this all starter with my dog finding a sponge with grill grease, swallowing it and growling and snipping when I finally caught up to him. I did take him to the vet emergency and they did get him to vomit the sponge up. My concern is at some point he will find something again of value that I will have to get away from him. I have heard its easier to deal with these issues in puppyhood then when they are adults.

    Thanks again for the info and links. I will work on the housebreaking on the carpet.

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    Tanya is offline Senior Member
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    NILF - make it so you provide all good things. all good things in life come from you. this makes you important in the dog's life

    work on drop it. train teh command. reward reward reward when he drops. You can also work on trading. I'll recommend a few good books that are well worth the read and will help you.

    Definitely find another training. I am not saying there is NEVER room for corrections in training. But alpha rolling a puppy creates a bad precedent and doesn't train anything.
    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

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    Tanya is offline Senior Member
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    Charlie (foster) and Rocky

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    You have received good advice about the alpha roll technique. Not a good idea! When Sophie was a baby we gave her a real bone. She growled at me when I tried to take it from her. We took it away and told her she was naughty. We tried again and she did it again. We found out that raw marrow bones can bring out primal instincts in dogs. We took it away till she was older and trained in proper behavior. She knows what it means when we say she is naughty. She now has bones and would never growl at us. My advice is to train first and give the treats that are problematic only once your dog has learned commands such as leave it or drop it.
    ~Pam



    Sophie DOB 04/13/2011 6 mo


    8.5 mo.

    Sophie 15 months, with Skye

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    Diesel_Dawg is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dog Paddle View Post
    And I like Dr. Ed Bailey on food aggression: Your dog's food is his. Give him his food and let him eat in peace, no messing around with hands in his face or his bowl or kids pestering him. Watch your kids. Your kids are YOUR responsibility, not your dog's. It makes me shudder when I hear people say they trained the dog to be tolerant with his food around the kids and then leave total responsibility for a child's safety up the dog. A dog, for heaven's sake, with what some say is the intelligence of a two year old child. IMO bones are much harder though, they don't gulp a bone down quickly. Hopefully they don't.
    I agree that you need to keep kids away from the dog when he eats, but I don't agree the food is the dog's. It isn't his food, it is yours. You gave it to him, you can take it away. You should be able to stop your dog from eating anything at anytime, to grab his food bowl without being growled or snapped at. Being able to take your dog's food bowl away mid meal would be integral with teaching him to give up high quality things he steals such as bones or grease filled sponges. Ensure you teach "leave it" and "drop it" for those "treats" he should not have.

    With puppies and children ensure even they understand the commands for puppy. Everyone in the household must be on the same page for dog training to ensure consistency, but depending on the age of your kids they should be supervised by an adult when with the puppy. Seems you now know the alpha roll wasn't a good idea so I doubt you'll use that technique again.

    Reiterate the potty training, sometimes puppies regress.

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