snapping & biting
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: snapping & biting

  1. #1
    burt is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    2

    Defaultsnapping & biting

    Hey everyone! This is my first post I am new to the site and looking for some advice. Burt is a 3 month old yellow lab puppy who is going through the normal biting and chewing phase. I have crate trained him and really have nothing to complain about except some snapping and aggressive occurrences. One time in the vet after getting shots I went to go pet him and it was like he turned into a different dog and snapped and viciously bit my hand drawing blood. I figured this was from the shots and the vet experience etc.. But now he has done it again when I discovered he had something in his mouth I went to reach for him and he snapped and aggressively bit me again! He is so playful and loving but I am starting to get worried about these vicious tendencies. From what I understand the teething kind of biting is normal but I don't know if this kind of "snapping" behavior is!? Ahhhh help!!!! Thank you in advance for the advice!!

  2. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    serenitydad's Avatar
    serenitydad is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Dayton OH
    Posts
    91

    Default

    Interesting question. That sounds unusual for a lab pup. This article, 01 Puppy Aggression - VeterinaryPartner.com - a VIN company!, may help you determine whether the cause is genetic, medical, or learned behavior. It may be a combination of factors, even possibly your unknowing contribution. Whatever you do, I would not hesitate to find answers. If this problem isn't correctable, it is in your interest and the pup's to act quickly so that he or she may be placed in a suitable home, for example, a home without kids and with an owner who is willing to devote a decade or more of training and vigilance. Keep us in the loop. I'm interested to see what you find. Good luck!
    True ambition is the deep desire to live usefully and walk humbly in God's grace. - Bill Wilson

  4. #3
    mitziandjudysmom's Avatar
    mitziandjudysmom is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    NE Ohio
    Posts
    9,429

    Default

    Three months is too young to say he is being aggressive. It would be easy to misinterpret puppy behavior. Sometimes the way they play may look aggressive.
    Always have a toy or nylabone to stick in his mouth whenever he starts biting. Whenever he starts biting, turn away from him so he sees that biting makes him lose your attention. As he grows, never show him that you are afraid of him. My six month pup still is in biting mode. When he bites at me, I tell him "kis kiss, no bite". Then when he licks me, I give lots of praise (high voice). You should be able to take anything out of his mouth. Be firm about it (use a firm low voice tone)and do not show that you are afraid.
    Last edited by mitziandjudysmom; 03-13-2013 at 07:20 AM.

  5. Remove Advertisements
    JustLabradors.com
    Advertisements
     

  6. #4
    Susan_MLL's Avatar
    Susan_MLL is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    165

    Default

    I disagree. This is not acceptable behavior from a 3 month old Labrador Retriever Puppy. That is not to say there may not be a combination of reasons this is happening but it is clearly not correct. When a typical Lab puppy is chewing and playing I personally do not like to use the word "bite". I feel there is a difference between normal play when the puppy is chewing on hands, chewing on ankles, doing things they are not supposed to even if those sharp baby teeth feel like it's a bite... we know it's not. To aggressively growl and draw blood is very very different. For me, a pup with something in it's mouth should easily be removed. Never should they do what your puppy did. I would encourage you to immediately find a professional behaviorist/trainer and as said above figure out what is going on, nip it in the bud one way or another before it get's out of hand. Bottom line, this is not correct behavior. Good Luck

    Danika & Eva

  7. #5
    BigBrownDog is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    11,990

    Default

    Its very difficult on an internet message board to accurately interpret what a new puppy owner is describing, I think. What could be perfectly normal to me, may seem like aggression to another. We have new puppy owners posting about "aggressive" Lab puppies constantly - and I don't think most of them are actually aggressive.

    We also don't know if a puppy acting like this has been encouraged through rough play with humans to be more mouthy - and this is the result of that kind of play usually.

    I do agree that you need to have someone with experienced eyes actually observe your puppy and advise you based on that observation. It would probably be a good start to talk to your vet about a trainer/behaviorist who uses positive reinforcement. Or - contact the nearest Lab club or all breed club in your area and see if they have a trainer connection you can use. The very last thing you want is some "trainer" who advises you to use alpha rolls to make your puppy submissive (and similar problematic techniques).
    Sharon, Blaise and Diesel.

  8. #6
    LuvBrown is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    830

    Default

    I echo what Susan said. And you should be able to tell the difference between a pup that might be tired and a bit crazed and in over-excitement bit hard when playing vs. it being nasty. I think you need a professional to look at him.

  9. #7
    citronella's Avatar
    citronella is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    734

    Default

    Many years ago when we adopted a beagle puppy we had the same issues. It was hard to believe that this little guy could be so vicious and yes at about 5 months he drew blood if we reached to take a chew toy away. I had never experience anything like this and I now consider myself a novice dog owner back then, even though I had a lab before that. My beagle was a good boy too, but he had issues with other dogs, or his toys etc.. We practically lived in fear of him. We all laughed when the kids came in to say good night sometimes and he would guard the bed and not let them get near me. We were stupid stupid ppl.

    This is only my small opinion but everyone says a lab shouldn't do that. I believe any dog is capable because it has to do with their surroundings, exercise level and their dominence tendencies. I think you need to nip this in the bud now. Take him for training, you need to take control and be the dominent member and show him you are boss. He knows you aren't the boss and is getting away with things that he shouldn't. Sorry I just feel so passionately about this because I learned a lot from my male beagles and said I would never do that again. And don't wish this upon anyone.
    Last edited by citronella; 03-13-2013 at 10:39 AM.
    The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!



  10. #8
    burt is offline Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    2

    Defaultthank you!

    Thank you so much for all the replies. I think the hardest problem is distinguishing being be overly excited or playful and being nasty. I have seen him be overly playful and mouthy but these couple of incidents have been more vicious than playful. I think I will take him to a trainer / behavior consultant because even if this is normal training can't hurt.

  11. #9
    serenitydad's Avatar
    serenitydad is offline Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Dayton OH
    Posts
    91

    Default

    One more thing, Burt - did you happen to get this pup when he was 5 or 6 weeks old? I just returned from visiting a friend who was telling me about a pup that would bite (not play biting, but very nastily) unexpectedly and without provocation. This pup was taken from the litter before he could learn from his mom and litter mates what was unacceptable behavior. If that is the case with your dog, you may not be able to wind the clock back, but you would have a likely reason, and you may help someone else avoid the same mistake in the future.
    True ambition is the deep desire to live usefully and walk humbly in God's grace. - Bill Wilson

Similar Threads

  1. Biting history & euthanasia
    By Diesel_Dawg in forum Lab Chat
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 03-08-2011, 12:35 PM
  2. She has started snapping at me
    By fourbabygirls in forum Lab Chat
    Replies: 51
    Last Post: 03-25-2008, 01:13 PM
  3. Puppy bites and snapping
    By Bella Notte in forum Lab Chat
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-25-2007, 11:24 AM
  4. snapping after correction
    By DFWLab in forum Lab Chat
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-23-2007, 11:28 AM
  5. Lab Behavior Problems - Biting & Mouthing
    By DakotasMom in forum Training Tips and Puppy Advice
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 07-21-2006, 05:28 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25