Time to find a trainer. Need some advice
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Thread: Time to find a trainer. Need some advice

  1. #1
    Jenylynne's Avatar
    Jenylynne is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultTime to find a trainer. Need some advice

    So I've finally decided its time for some professional help.

    Cleo and Zeus a really good with the basics:

    Sit sit-stay
    Down down-stay
    Leave it
    Drop it
    Go to your bed
    Kennel

    EXCEPT when people come over. For the first 10 minutes they are CRAZY. They are horrible greeters and jump all over people. At 85 and 75 pounds its dangerous.

    So I need help. I've tried putting them on leash, stepping on it. Distraction etc.

    What am I looking for in a good in home trainer. Does anyone have recommendations in SE Pennsylvania or northern Delaware areas?

    Thanks for your help.
    Jen


    Cleo, our black beauty


    Zeus, our yellow, mellow, fellow

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  3. #2
    Belles mom is offline Senior Member
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    No idea on a trainer in that area, but have you tried crating them for the first 1/2 hour guests are there. Then let one out to greet, put that dog away, and let the other one out? May take a few visits before you can eventually let both out. Have you told your guests to ignore them, even turn their backs to them?


    Karen and the gang
    BBI Kodi's Journey To Anotch (Journey)
    BBI Kodi's Blackpowder Striker (Flint)

  4. #3
    Jenylynne's Avatar
    Jenylynne is offline Senior Member
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    Karen, I never thought to do that! It just might work. Thanks for the suggestion.
    Jen


    Cleo, our black beauty


    Zeus, our yellow, mellow, fellow

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    If they are good on sit/stay then use it. . Teach them to sit when your door is opened. If they jump up on release make them sit again. If they can't sit in the presence of guests work on sit more.

    If they are only acknowledged/greeted when they are sitting they will learn quick that in order to be greeted they need to be sitting.
    Deep Run Traveling "Takoda" (12/05/12)

    Deep Run Easygoing Ezekial "Zeke" (04/13/17)



  7. #5
    flynbyu2's Avatar
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    We had this problem with our very puppy-like, 70+ pound German Shepherd.
    With some instruction for your guests, you can usually break a dog of this habit.

    Tell your guests to turn their backs to the dog and not speak to it or touch it until the dog has calmed down. Your guests may have to spin around a dozen times to accomplish this, but after a few times the dog will get it.

    If your guests are petting the dog and calling his/her name while they jump, they're being rewarded for a bad behavior. ANY rewarded behavior will be repeated by your dog.
    Anybody who doesn't know what soap tastes like never washed a dog. ~Franklin P. Jones

  8. #6
    Bob Pr. is offline Senior Member
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    It's very possible that some of the advice you're offered will solve this problem for you -- but it's also possible it won't.

    But rather than hiring a behaviorist/dog trainer to supplement the VERY good training clearly you've already done, my VERY strong preference & recommendation is for you to learn the techniques and methods (1) to train your furry house members to act more appropriately (that way, at the first indication that the training is slipping, you'll be in a strong position to reinforce the desired behavior); (2) what to advise your guests on how to act more appropriately with your Labs when first entering your home; and (3) the realistic limits of (1) & (2).

    You might go to Dr. Patricia McConnell's website (she's my favorite animal behaviorist), click on the "Contact Us" link, and ask them if they have any publications addressing this particular issue. Also, they do (or at least used to have) a staff of behaviorists one of which you can hire at reasonable costs to give you e-mail advice on all the steps you need to do to remediate this problem.

    Patricia McConnell PH.D. | McConnell Publishing Inc.

    BUT, IMO, possibly some of your wishes may be unrealistic and unattainable.

    Most Labs are, by their very nature, extremely sociable and friendly animals -- they love to meet and greet people. That's one of their characteristics that make them so charming and lovable to us as owners. In addition, typically when they're young (less than 7? years old??) they have high energy, are easily excited, and their internal rubber band motors easily get really wound up tight.

    So -- possibly -- your imagined end goal of acceptable, desired performance may be as easily attained for Labs as teaching fish to swim up Niagara Falls -- or nearly so?

    When I had my previous Lab, Bess, her similar behavior with house guests on their arrival was a problem much of her life.

    We diminished the problem by putting up a baby gate with Bess on the other side before letting the guests in the home. That way, Bess got to see them for awhile so her excitement could bubble over and then calm down -- some of the "new" could wear off -- to more of a simmer before Bess was allowed in the room with them.

    And that also let us assess our guest(s) capacity and tolerance for dealing comfortably, appropriately, with a friendly Lab and whether to remove the barrier or not. Some people are just not comfortable having a Lab be that sociable or close to them so, in those rare cases, the barrier remained to separate them.

    In YOUR case, with TWO Labs competing with each other to nuzzle, lick, and otherwise give a thorough Lab greeting to their guests -- well, I can't imagine that would give you any less of a problem.

    If you used a baby gate type remedy, maybe take turns in letting out either Cleo or Zeus first, before they were both present, that might help?

    I'll be curious as to how you handle this issue and what results you get.

    Good luck.

    ETA: AARGH!!
    Just noticed the OP is over 2 months old.

    SO, what did you do, what have you worked out?


    Last edited by Bob Pr.; 04-11-2013 at 02:24 PM. Reason: add ETA comment
    Puff [YF, AKC field line (from competing HT/FT breeder) 62 lbs, dob: 8-'01]

    Bess [BF, AKC bench line (from competing show breeder) 55 lbs., 1967-1981] "Poor Bess, the Wonder Dog":
    http://forum.justlabradors.com/showt...?p=748#post748

  9. #7
    grlzmommy's Avatar
    grlzmommy is offline Member
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    OMG I have the same problem with Hunter he is HORRIBLE with that! My Summer was bad too and really didn't get better with it ever but we lost her at almost 8.
    I've tried the turn around ignore and he's great with me and he will sit and then as soon as I give him attention he tries to jump up and he is trying to lick my face! That's what all the jumping seems to be about he wants to give kisses to everyone!
    The hard thing also is he doesn't just jump he'll bark at u if u ignore him so it's a double whammy.
    They just have so much love to give!
    HUNTER 10/15/2012
    Missing you every day Summer
    11/1/2004-09/26/2012

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    Dog Paddle is offline Senior Member
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    I find a session of Leslie McDevitt's "Look At That" game brings the focus back to me and calms the dog down to the point where I can then let him go have a greeting. My game is called Who'zat. It's one of several items from her book that I find very helpful. Control Unleashed

  11. #9
    Jenylynne's Avatar
    Jenylynne is offline Senior Member
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    Bob: Thanks for the reply. Yes, I have come to realize that my labs just love people and they get so excited when someone comes to the door. However, at 75 and 90 lbs., it had become a safety issue, especially with my kids' friends.

    I did have a trainer come to the house. She was amazing. (But not cheap) What we ended up doing is having them go to their bed every time there is a knock on the door or the door bell rings. IF they don't go immediately, I point and have them go to the bed, and hold them in a stay. I go to the door, open it and immediately go back to them and treat them while the person comes in. If they so much as move, I have to close the door, get them to quiet down and go to their bed. Once the person is in and the dogs have stayed on their bed, I have the person treat them and at that point, they are usually much calmer and just butt wagging and licking without the jumping. Within 2 minutes, they are over it all together and laying on the couch again.

    We don't have it perfected, but it is much, much better and the more we practice, the better they are.

    Ultimately, every time the doorbell rings or there is a knock at the door, that will signal them to go to their bed. I really have confidence this will happen. IT's taken a long time because as you know, with two, it's double the training!!

    And I do have to say, the older they get, the better control they seem to have over themselves.

    In all, I would say it was well worth the money to have the trainer in. She gave me other advice with leash walking, emergency recall etc. Things that seem so common sense but I never in a million years would have known how to properly execute.
    Last edited by Jenylynne; 04-12-2013 at 08:21 AM.
    Jen


    Cleo, our black beauty


    Zeus, our yellow, mellow, fellow

  12. #10
    BigBrownDog is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Belles mom View Post
    No idea on a trainer in that area, but have you tried crating them for the first 1/2 hour guests are there. Then let one out to greet, put that dog away, and let the other one out? May take a few visits before you can eventually let both out. Have you told your guests to ignore them, even turn their backs to them?
    This is exactly what I did with Diesel when he was young. Made a huge difference in his behavior and in my stress level when guests would arrive. I hated greeting and taking coats while trying to keep the big enthusiastic dog from overwhelming the new arrivals.
    Sharon, Blaise and Diesel.

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