Would you do this to your dog?
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Thread: Would you do this to your dog?

  1. #1
    mistarkos's Avatar
    mistarkos is offline Senior Member
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    DefaultWould you do this to your dog?





    If dogs do not go to heaven, then I prefer to follow them where they go.

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  3. #2
    Samson is offline Senior Member
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    Personally No !

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    mistarkos's Avatar
    mistarkos is offline Senior Member
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    You could harm his snout, right?




    If dogs do not go to heaven, then I prefer to follow them where they go.

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    Samson is offline Senior Member
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    I don't hit my dogs in any way apart from a smack on the rump when I'm playing with them.

    I have never had a dog deliberately bite me so perhaps I'm not the right person to ask ?

  7. #5
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    kassabella is offline Senior Member
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    Personally no. I think it is too close to hitting. I could do it harder than intended, and hurt him.

    I think we have to define bite. Is it mouthing. For that with 2 of mine the yelping loudly stopped it.
    If it is aggresive biting then for me why do something they don't like when we are trying to encourage better behaviour. Instead I am telling them we will hurt them, so won't trust me .
    For aggressive biting I would get a trainer.

    Erns bit me a couple of times. I know for sure I had tried that it would have made him worse.
    Last edited by kassabella; 09-12-2012 at 08:27 AM.

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  8. #6
    mistarkos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kassabella View Post
    Erns bit me a couple of times. I know for sure I had tried that it would have made him worse.
    Definitely it would make it worst.. it always does.




    If dogs do not go to heaven, then I prefer to follow them where they go.

  9. #7
    slackercodemonkey is offline Senior Member
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    The monks of New Skete in the book "How to Be Your Dog's Best Friend: The Classic Training Manual for Dog Owners" suggest this although not for biting that I can remember.

  10. #8
    Diesel_Dawg is offline Senior Member
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    Absolutely not. There is no reason to use physical contact like that. Somebody ought to chuck him under the chin when he runs off the mouth of how to train a dog & see how he likes it.

  11. #9
    BigBrownDog is offline Senior Member
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    Since the Monks of New Skete were brought up, I thought I would contribute this bit from an article I just posted in this forum. One of the Monks has actually expressed regret for advocating dominance based training techniques.

    ........Fast-forward several years to 1978 and the emergence of the Monks of New Skete as the new model for dog training, asserting a philosophy that “understanding is the key to communication, compassion, and communion” with your dog. Sounds great, yes? The Monks were considered cutting edge at the time – but contrary to their benevolent image, they were in fact responsible for the widespread popularization of the “Alpha-Wolf Roll-Over” (now shortened to the alpha roll). Reviewing the early observations of captive wolves, the Monks concluded that the alpha roll is a useful tool for demonstrating one’s authority over a dog. Unfortunately, this is a complete and utter misinterpretation of the submissive roll-over that is voluntarily offered by less assertive dogs, not forcibly commanded by stronger ones.

    The Monks also advocated the frequent use of other physical punishments such as the scruff shake (grab both sides of the dog’s face and shake, lifting the dog off the ground) and cuffing under the dog’s chin with an open hand several times, hard enough to cause the dog to yelp.

    While professing that “training dogs is about building a relationship that is based on respect and love and understanding,” even their most recent book, Divine Canine: The Monks’ Way to a Happy, Obedient Dog (2007), is still heavy on outdated, erroneous dominance theory. Immediately following their suggestion that “a kindly, gentle look tells the dog she is loved and accepted,” they say “But it is just as vital to communicate a stern reaction to bad behavior. A piercing, sustained stare into a dog’s eyes tells her who’s in charge; it establishes the proper hierarchy of dominance between person and pet.” (It’s also a great way to unwittingly elicit a strong aggressive response if you choose the wrong dog as the subject for your piercing, sustained stare.)

    Despite the strong emergence of positive reinforcement-based training in the last 20 years, the Monks don’t seem to have grasped that the “respect” part needs to go both ways for a truly compassionate communion with your dog. Perhaps one of these days . .


    from the Whole Dog Journal written by Pat Miller, CBCC-KA, CPDT-KA, CDBC
    Last edited by BigBrownDog; 09-12-2012 at 09:06 PM.
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  12. #10
    brody's Avatar
    brody is offline Senior Member
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    No

    nasty to set up that sweet sweet dog so he could cuff her too
    http://andrea-agilityaddict.blogspot.com/

    “I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do something that I can do.” H. Keller

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